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B.H.  K. 


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THE  BOOK  OF 
PUBLIC  ARMS 


PUBLIC 
ARMS  OF  THE  UNITED  KINGDOM  OF  GREAT  BUITAIN  AND  IRELAk^g^^^Cj^/ 


THE  BOOK  OF 

PUBLIC  ARMS 

A  COMPLETE  ENCYCLOPiEDIA 
OF  ALL  ROYAL,  TERRITORIAL, 
MUNICIPAL,  CORPORATE,  OFFI- 
CIAL,  AND   IMPERSONAL   ARMS 


BY 

ARTHUR    CHARLES    FOX-DAVIES 

OF   LINCOLN'S   INN,    BARRISTER-AT-LAW 
AUTHOR    OF    "armorial    FAMILIES,"    "THE   ART   OF    HERALDRY,"    ETC. 


A  NEW  EDITION  CONTAINING 
OVER  ISOO  DRAWINGS 


LONDON:     T.    C.    &    E.    C.    JACK 

67    LONG    ACRE,    W.C. 

AND    EDINBURGH 

1915 


/V 


■V 


« 


PREFACE 

At  the  outset  of  these  few  pages,  by  way  of  introduction  to  this  revised  edition  of 
my  "  Book  of  Public  Arms,"  I  wish  to  emphasise  the  keen  and  generous,  and  at  the 
same  time  disinterested,  interest  which  my  publishers,  Messrs  T.  C.  &  E.  C.  Jack, 
have  taken  in  the  book. 

The  previous  edition  contained  only  the  arms  of  Towns,  Counties,  and 
Universities.  The  additions  to  these  categories  alone  in  the  intervening  score  of 
years  would  have  justified  a  new  edition  from  the  mere  consideration  of  available 
material.  But  as  I  wished  to  make  the  book  as  perfect  as  possible  I  decided, 
and  Messrs  Jack  were  agreeable,  to  extend  the  book  so  that  it  should-  include 
every  British  impersonal  coat  of  arms  in  existence.  That  meant  adding  the  arms 
of  Schools,  Colleges,  Societies,  Trading  Companies,  Colonies,  Hospitals,  Episcopal 
Sees,  etc.,  etc.  That  I  have  endeavoured  to  do,  and  the  object  in  view  in  this  edition 
has  been  to  include  every  single  coat  of  arms  of  an  impersonal  character.  How  far 
I  have  succeeded  remains  to  be  seen.  Through  the  great  kindness  of  Lyon  King 
of  Arms  and  Ulster  King  of  Arms,  who  have  both  allowed  me  access  to  their 
records,  I  can  confidently  say  that  every  genuine  impersonal  coat  of  arms  included 
in  their  Scottish  and  Irish  records  will  be  found  in  this  book.  And  let  me  here 
tender  my  grateful  thanks  for  the  assistance  given  me  by  Sir  J.  Balfour  Paul,  C.V.O., 
Lyon  King  of  Arms,  and  Capt.  Neville  Wilkinson,  C.V.O.,  Ulster  King  of  Arms, 
and  to  F.  J.  Grant,  Esq.,  Rothesay  Herald  and  Lyon  Clerk,  and  G.  D.  Burtchaell, 
Esq.,  Athlone  Pursuivant  of  Arms,  for  the  enormous  help  and  assistance  they  have 
given  me.     I  am,  as  my  readers  must  be,  very  grateful  to  them. 

Nobody  is  ever  permitted  the  same  facilities  with  regard  to  the  College  of  Arms. 
The  different  constitution  of  that  Corporation  prevents  it.  But  I  have  not  met  with 
any  hindrance.  Every  help  has  been  given  me  within  the  limits  which  are  per- 
missible, every  question  I  have  asked  any  officer  of  arms  has  been  answered,  and 
I  know  many  of  the  officers,  and  I  have  badgered  my  friends  there  to  what  I  think 
must  have  been  the  limits  of  their  patience.  And  I  do  wish  to  put  on  record  that 
some  of  them — knowing  I  was  engaged  upon  this  book — when  they  have  come 
across  some  strange  coat  which  they  have  thought  I  might  like  to  include  have  sent 
me  the  details  unasked.  I  have  had  help  there  far  beyond  anything  I  expected  or 
had  a  right  to  expect,  and  I  most  gratefully  tender  my  thanks  to  all  those  at  the 
College  of  Arms  who  have  helped  me.  My  debt  to  them  is  heavy.  But  I  cannot 
guarantee  I  have  everything  from  their  records.  There  may  still  be  treasure-trove 
for  writers  who  follow  me.  I  probably  have  got  all  the  ancient  grants,  for  Berry,  the 
Registrar  of  the  College  of  Arms  at  the  close  of  the  eighteenth  century,  gutted  the 
Grant  Books  for  his  "  Encyclopaedia  Heraldica,"  and  got  sacked  for  doing  so.  Of  the 
b  V 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

grants  since  Berry's  time  I  am  a  bit  doubtful  that  I  have  them  all.  I  have  written 
broadcast  to  every  public  body  that  I  knew  was  using  arms,  or  thought  h'kely  to 
be,  and  I  cheerfully  acknowledge  the  fact  that  very  few  of  my  letters  have  remained 
unanswered.  There  is  none  of  the  disinclination  to  give  nie  full  details  with  regard 
to  impersonal  arms  that  I  met  with  in  the  editing  of  my  book  "  Armorial  Families  " 
and  in  the  editing  of"  Burke's  Landed  Gentrj-,"  and  I  have  nearly  always  been  supplied 
at  my  request  with  full  particulars  and  with  the  dates  of  grant.  These  details  have  all 
been  checked  at  the  College  of  Arms,  and  the  information  I  print  may  be  relied  upon 
as  far  as  it  is  humanly  possible  to  guarantee  work  of  mind  and  pen,  both  liable 
always  to  unintentional  lapse  into  error.  If  the  English  impersonal  coats  in  this  book 
are  not  complete,  I  feel  confident  they  are  not  far  short  of  being  so,  and  I  am  fairly 
confident  that  my  book  may  also  be  entirely  relied  upon  on  the  point  of  whether 
any  given  coat  of  arms  is  genuine  or  otherwise.  I  think  I  have  every  genuine  impersonal 
coat  of  arms.  I  think  I  have,  but  I  am  not  sure.  At  any  rate  I  have  done  my  best. 
Of  the  bogus  impersonal  coats  I  can  only  say  I  have  included  every  one  of  which 
I  have  had  knowledge,  if  it  had  serious  claim  to  consideration.  Bogus  arms  one  can 
only  deal  with  if  one  comes  across  them.  Naturally  there  must  be  many  of  which 
I  have  never  heard. 

There  is,  however,  one  class  of  impersonal  arms  which  I  have  entirely  ignored. 
I  refer  to  the  arms  of  the  ancient  abbeys  and  other  monastic  establishments.  They 
are  all  long  since  extinct,  and  any  interest  in  them,  if  there  be  any,  can  be  only  of  an 
entirely  antiquarian  character.  Scores  of  them  are  recorded  in  some  form  or  another 
in  the  College  of  Arms,  but  I  know  of  no  official  formal  record  of  a  grant  or  con- 
firmation to  any  such  body  as  an  existing  corporation.  Such  records  as  exist  are 
incidental  records  of  extinct  bodies.  There  is  scarcely  a  religious  foundation  to 
whicn  there  are  not  several  coats  of  arms  attributed.  The  whole  subject  is  confusion, 
resulting  from  the  painstaking  attempts  of  bygone  antiquaries  to  convert  into  coats 
of  arms  devices  from  seals.  Some,  of  course,  were  used  as  and  intended  to  be  coats 
of  arms.  Some  were  purely  personal  to  a  particular  individual.  The  bulk,  I  strongly 
believe,  were  never  intended  to  be  regarded  as  more  than  mere  seal  devices.  It 
is  impossible  to  get  at  the  truth,  and  the  truth,  if  it  could  be  ascertained,  matters 
so  little  that  I  have  thought  it  wisest  to  leave  the  whole  category  alone.  The 
information  is  seldom  wanted,  and  the  bulk  of  it  is  already  in  print  for  the  use  of 
students  and  inquirers. 

In  addition  to  the  British  coats  to  which  I  have  alluded,  this  volume  will  be 
found  to  include  many  foreign  coats  of  arms.  As  to  these  I  do  not  pretend  to  the 
slightest  knowledge  whether  they  are  genuine  or  bogus.  I  have  made  no  attempt 
to  verify  them,  and  I  accept  no  responsibility  for  them.  I  have  tried  to  obtain 
correct  information,  and  I  have  done  the  best  I  could  to  obtain  the  arms  of  all 
Foreign  Countries,  and  of  the  Principal  Foreign  Cities.  For  foreign  arms  in  the 
volume  I  make  no  higher  claim.  They  are  merely  included  in  the  hope 
that  they  may  be  useful  to  my  readers,  but  I  do  not  pretend  that  the  in- 
formation I  give  concerning  them  even  approximates  in  value  to  the  information 
I    give  as   to  British   arms.     As  to  these  I  hope   and   believe   the  details  may  be 

vi 


PREFACE 

absolutely    relied   upon.       As   to    foreign    arms    I    merely   give   the    information    as 
the  best  I  can  get. 

Subject  to  the  liability — a  liability  I  personally  am  painfully  conscious  of — of 
all  human  work  to  carry  the  risk  of  error,  I  honestly  believe  my  book  may  be 
depended  upon  as  to  the  accuracy  of  the  details  of  the  arms  and  the  statements 
of  facts  as  to  whether  the  arms  are  or  are  not  recorded.  The  Scottish  and  Irish 
ones  I  speak  of  with  confidence.  I  searched  the  registers  myself,  and,  as  to  the 
Irish  Records — some  of  which  are  far  from  being  grant  books — I  had  the  invaluable 
assistance  of  Mr  G.  D.  Burtchaell,  Athlone  Pursuivant  of  Arms.  In  Ireland,  where 
Visitations  were  practically  never  made  and  where  the  registers  of  Ulster's  Office 
before  the  eighteenth  century  admittedly  might  be  more  perfect,  there  is  a  tendency 
of  thought  which  admits  as  proof  of  the  right  to  arms  many  things  such  as  draft 
grants  and  the  private  papers  of  dead  and  gone  officers  of  arms  to  fill  up  possible 
gaps.  To  what  extent  such  evidences  are  actually  proof  might  be  questioned  were  it 
not  the  habitual  practice  of  Ulster's  Office  to  stretch  the  point  in  their  favour.  I 
don't  think  that  any  Irish  coat  I  have  included  is  likely  to  be  disallowed.  In 
Scotland  there  is  a  hard  and  fast  line.  The  Register  is  the  register,  and  a  coat  is 
in  it,  or  not  in  it.  There  is  no  half-way  house,  no  matter  what  may  be  the  value 
of  various  other  records  as  proof  of  ancient  user  entitling  a  coat  to  be  matriculated, 
and  not  granted,  to  win  its  way  into  the  charmed  circle  of  authorised  arms. 

With  regard  to  the  records  of  the  College  of  Arms  the  position  is  this.  There  is 
a  proper  record  by  docquet  or  copy  of  grant  of  every  coat  of  arms  that  has  ever  been 
granted  by  Letters  Patent.  I  don't  know  exactly  upon  what  basis  of  authority  we 
find,  as  we  do,  records  of  most  of  the  ancient  impersonal  arms  in  the  Visitation  Books. 
Most  of  the  ancient  City  and  Town  arms  which  are  genuine  are  to  be  found  there, 
but  I  am  bound  to  say  that  frequently  the  essence  of  the  record  seems  to  be  the 
registration  of  the  common  seals  of  the  Corporations  rather  than  their  arms. 
Where  arms  are  recorded  as  arms,  or  where  the  device  of  the  seal  is  plainly  armorial 
and  the  tinctures  are  tricked,  there  is  no  difficulty,  but  there  are  one  or  two  cases 
concerning  which  it  is  difficult  to  speak  with  assured  certainty.  The  Visitation  Books 
are  official  records,  and  a  perfect  record  therein  is,  of  course,  conclusive  admission  of 
right.  But  there  are  of  some  coats  of  arms  contemporary  enrolments  at  the  College 
of  Arms  in  books  which  are  neither  grant  books  nor  visitation  books — books 
which  are  principally  the  painstaking  work  of  bygone  officers  of  arms,  the  records 
their  industry  created.  Some,  of  course,  can  be  dismissed  at  once  as  quite  accurate 
but  of  no  validating  authority — evidence  of  user  but  not  evidence  of  right.  But 
there  are  one  or  two  which  cannot  be  lightly  dismissed,  and  for  that  reason  I  would 
like  to  add  the  warning  that  I  am  not  entirely  certain  as  to  all  of  the  records,  and 
though  all  of  the  coats  which  I  state  to  be  "  recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms  "  are 
so  recorded,  I  cannot  in  every  case  in  which  I  use  the  words  guarantee  the  quality 
and  authority  and  the  validity  of  the  particular  book  in  which  the  record  appears. 
Then  there  are  a  number  of  visitation  records  in  which  the  arms  without  their 
tinctures  are  to  be  found.  These  are  formally,  I  believe,  held  to  be  imperfect 
records.     Then   take  such  an   example  as  the  record  of  the   arms   of  the  Middle 

vii 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

Temple.  At  the  Visitation  of  the  County  of  Northampton  a  family  of  the  name 
of  Temple  exhibited  and  claimed  the  familiar  cross  and  iamb.  To  that  family  the 
arms  were  disallowed,  the  reason  entered  in  the  Visitation  Book  being,  "  These  be  the 
arms  of  the  Hon.  Society  of  the  Middle  Temple."  But  there  is  no  proper  record  of 
these  arms  to  the  Middle  Temple,  or  of  any  of  the  arms  of  the  Inns  of  Court,  for 
the  Inns  of  Court,  not  being  Corporate  Bodies,  were  not  in  the  seventeenth  century 
regarded  as  competent  either  to  bear  arms  or  receive  a  grant  of  arms.  More  recent 
precedents  may  have  altered  this,  but  in  view  of  the  facts,  what  is  the  value,  as  a 
determining  factor  of  right  or  no  right,  of  that  entry  in  the  Visitation  of  the  County 
of  Northampton  ?  I  hold  it  is  entirely  negligible,  but  I  am  bound  to  add  that  a 
distinguished  officer  of  arms  has  expressed  to  me  the  contrary  opinion.  I  may 
perhaps  add  that  this  uncertainty  does  not  arise  as  to  personal  arms.  The  officers 
of  arms  had  powers  of  compulsion  which  they  could  and  did  apply  to  the  individuals 
they  summoned  to  attend  them  at  the  Visitations.  The  lists  of  "disclaimers"  show 
how  they  did  their  work.  I  have  never  seen  the  name  of  a  Corporate  Body  in  the 
list  of  "  disclaimers,"  and  on  that  I  base  my  belief  in  their  exemption  from  compulsory 
appeai'ance.  There  has,  of  course,  in  bygone  days  quite  as  much  as  in  modern  times, 
been  the  home-made  manufacture  of  coat-armour,  but  there  has  been  an  additional 
factor  in  respect  of  the  arms  of  impersonal  corporations.  There  has  always  been 
the  desire  to  do  honour  to  and  to  perpetuate  the  memory  of  the  founder  by  the 
adoption  of  his  arms.  It  is  a  highly  laudable  sentiment  in  the  abstract,  but  in 
operative  fact    it  is  illegal.     Suppose   a    School  to  commemorate   its    founder,  the 

last  Earl  of  X ,  were  to  style  itself  "The  Earldom  of  X ."     It  would  not  be 

allowed  a  vote  in  the  House  of  Lords.  In  the  same  way  it  would  have  no  right 
to  the  arms  of  the  Earl,  which  were  probably  granted  by  Patent  with  as  definitely 
specified  and  as  well  understood  a  remainder  as  was  his  Peerage. 

But  there  are  scores  of  Colleges,  Schools,  and  other-institutions  which  are  sinning 
in  this  way,  and  as  the  use  of  the  arms  in  many  such  cases  goes  back  for  a  prolonged 
period,  and  as  practically  every  such  body  so  circumstanced  before  the  Visitations 
was  "  allowed  "  the  arms  of  the  founder,  I  feel  practically  certain  that  if  one  joint 
petition  were  lodged  by  all  the  Schools  and  Colleges  so  circumstanced  at  the  moment, 
praying  that  His  Majesty  would'  be  graciously  pleased  to  issue  His  Royal  Licence 
that  they  might  continue  to  use  the  arms  of  their  founders,  that  such  a  petition  would 
be  granted.  There  is,  however,  the  further  difficulty — e.g.  the  case  of  Harrow  School 
— that  in  some  cases  the  founders  themselves  had  no  right  at  all  to  the  arms 
attributed  to  them.  And  I  fancy  a  Royal  Licence  would  hardly  be  granted  in 
such  a  case  as  Shrewsbury,  where  the  founder  was  a  king,  and  the  use  of  the  Royal 
Arms  would  therefore  be  involved. 

But  Dulwich  College  and  Charterhouse  are  cases  in  which  1  feel  pretty  certain 
a  Royal  Licence  would  be  granted  if  it  were  applied  for. 

Grants  of  arms  are  never  made  in  the  ordinary  way  to  Colonies.  The  arms 
of  a  Colony  or  of  a  self-governing  Dominion  are  assigned  by  Royal  Warrant  under 
the  Sign  Manual  of  the  Sovereign.  Though  there  are  certain  fees  payable  upon 
the   issue  of  such   a   warrant,   it   is   nobody's    business    to    initiate    the    application 

viii 


PREFACE 

therefor,  and  these  Colonial  warrants  have  been  sadly  neglected.  But  another 
factor  has  been  in  existence.  With  that  sublime  interference  with  which  one 
Government  Department  encroaches  on  another  the  Admiralty  has  published  in 
the  official  book  of  authorised  flags  the  devices  for  the  various  British  territories 
beyond  the  seas  which  it  considers  suitable  for  use  upon  the  flags  of  the 
Governors  of  the  different  Colonies.  Most  of  these  are  wrong  and  usually  ap- 
palling. Then  in  another  direction  we  have  the  Mint  supplying  seals  with  devices 
more  or  less  heraldic,  and  there  has  been  always  the  native  imagination  inventing 
home-made  coats  of  arms  which  found  their  way  on  to  the  official  stationery  and 
often  even  on  to  the  coins  and  postage  stamps.  Then  we  even  got  to  the  length  of 
the  Colonial  Office  authorising  a  flag  for  Australia,  which  I  have  always  thought 
was  the  extreme  limit.  The  Royal  Warrant  assigning  arms  to  any  territory  ought 
to  have  preceded  the  making  of  its  first  seal ;  but  the  actual  fact  was  that  until  a  few 
years  ago  Jamaica,  Gibraltar,  Nova  Scotia,  Cape  Colony,  and  Canada  were  the  only 
Colonies  which  had  genuine  arms,  whereas  every  Colony  used  something  or  other. 

I  hope  I  am  not  telling  secrets  when  I  say  that  it  was  no  high-browed  desire 
for  righteousness  which  initiated  the  recent  reform.  As  a  matter  of  fact  the  require- 
ments of  the  Victoria  Memorial  in  front  of  Buckingham  Palace  proved  to  be  the 
operative  factor.  But  I  do  want  to  enter  my  protest  against  the  ghastly  enormities 
which  have  been  perpetrated  by  Royal  Warrant  under  the  guise  of  Colonial  arms. 
The  great  bulk  are  appalling  monstrosities.  There  is  no  other  way  of  describing 
them.  What  could  be  worse,  for  instance,  than  the  arms  of  the  Leeward  Islands? — 
and  these  are  official.  Some  of  the  earlier  Colonial  arms — Jamaica,  Nova  Scotia, 
and  Newfoundland — are  arms  to  which  no  exception  can  be  taken.  The  arms, 
moreover,  granted  in  the  reign  of  Queen  Victoria  to  Canada  and  its  Provinces, 
or  to  Cape  Colony,  are  quite  good.  But  there  has  recently  been  a  large  number  of 
Warrants  issued  to  Colonies.  There  seems  to  be  about  a  large  proportion  a 
uniform  level  of  artistic  rottenness  which  surpasses  all  previous  conception.  The 
fault  lies  with  the  Colonies,  which  have  insisted  on  the  perpetuation  of  existing 
devices. 

There  are  many  Towns  in  the  self-governing  Dominions  which  are  using  bogus 
arms  or  have  no  authentic  arms  ;  in  fact,  the  only  towns  outside  the  United  Kingdom 
to  which  grants  have  been  made  are: — Kingston  (Jamaica),  Bombay,  Calcutta,  Cape 
Town,  Pretoria,  Johannesburg,  and  Sydney. 

Very  few  British  counties  have  as  yet  obtained  arms.  In  England  it  was  held  that 
nobody  existed  in  a  county  competent  to  bear  arms  until  the  formation  of  the  County 
Councils.  In  most  cases  the  arms  of  the  County  Town  did  duty,  but  there  were  cases 
in  which  separate  arms  for  the  county  were  in  use  ;  Middlese.x,  Kent,  and  Surrey  were 
instances.  But  since  the  formation  of  the  County  Councils  several  grants  have  been 
made.  West  Sussex  was  the  first,  Shropshire  was  the  next ;  then  came  Lancashire, 
Middlesex,  Norfolk,  and  Somerset.  The  London  County  Council,  after  a  particularly 
iniquitous  heraldic  career,  has  at  last  obtained  a  grant,  no  doubt  because  the 
fees  were  forthcoming  from  a  private  source,  as  indeed  was  the  case  with  both 
West  Sussex  and  Shropshire. 

ix 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

In  Scotland  arms  were  matriculated  in  iSoo  for  "the  County  of  Perth"  and  in 
1890  "the  Council  of  the  County  of  Berwick."  The  only  other  county  arms  in  that 
kingdom  are  those  matriculated  in  1889  by  the  Commissioners  of  Supply  for  the 
County  of  Renfrew. 

There  are  no  county  arms  in  Ireland  ;  but  arms  for  the  four  provinces  of  Ulster, 
Munster,  Leinster,  and  Connaught  officially  exist,  although  one  is  puzzled  to  know 
to  what  or  to  whom  they  are  assigned  or  by  whom  they  are  borne. 

There  has  never  been  any  objection  raised  to  the  granting  of  arms  to  Cities 
and  Towns  of  a  corporate  nature,  and  at  the  present  time  grants  are  even 
being  made  to  Urban  District  Councils,  Erith  and  Twickenham  being  cases 
in  point. 

The  next  category  of  impersonal  arms  is  to  be  found  in  those  of  the  Episcopal 
and  Archiepiscopal  Sees.  These  call  for  little  comment.  It  seems  to  be  well 
established  that  the  pallium  stands  for  the  status  or  rank  of  Archbishop  rather 
than  for  any  area  of  jurisdiction.  Though  the  different  archiepiscopal  coats  now 
have  certain  variations  and  are  stereotyped  into  coats  of  arms,  it  is  unlikely  that 
these  variations  are  in  reality  any  more  than  former  artistic  differences  of  a  universal 
type.  The  arms  of  the  Anglican  Episcopal  Church  Sees  in  Scotland  and  Ireland 
lapsed  with  the  disestablishment  of  those  churches,  and  the  Welsh  coats  will  follow 
suit.  There  would  really  seem  no  objection  to  a  continuance  of  their  use  if  a  Royal 
Licence  from  His  Majesty  were  to  be  obtained.  By  the  conjunction  of  various  sees 
the  marshalling  of  the  various  coats  would  become  necessary.  With  one  or  two 
exceptions  the  whole  of  the  British  Episcopal  arms  outside  the  United  Kingdom 
are  utterly  bogus.  A  coat  of  arms  is  not  a  necessity,  and  if  the  Church  desires 
that  her  Bishops  should  use  impersonal  arms  upon  their  seals,  it  should  take  steps 
to  have  these  properly  called  into  being. 

It  should  be  noted  that  the  mitre  of  a  Bishop  and  an  Archbishop  are  the  same. 
The  Bishop  of  Durham,  and  he  alone,  has  the  right  to  encircle  the  rim  of  his  mitre 
with  a  coronet. 

The  rest  of  the  impersonal  arms  call  for  little  comment.  Any  corporate  body 
having  perpetual  succession  and  a  common  seal  have  the  right  to  obtain  a  grant 
of  arms,  and  certainly  arms  exist  in  cases  where  this  qualification  is  at  any  rate 
doubtful.  Nowadays  Schools,  Colleges,  Universities,  Banks,  Insurance  Offices,  and 
Railway  Companies,  Hospitals,  and  Charitable  Societies  are  amongst  those  bodies 
which  have  obtained  grants  of  arms. 

The  arms  of  the  Livery  Companies  of  London  and  other  cities,  a  large  pro- 
portion of  which  are  quite  genuine,  present  in  different  places  a  uniformity  of  motive 
which  is  puzzling,  and  at  first  sight  apparently  indicative  of  copying  or  usurpation. 
The  real  explanation,  however,  is  to  be  found  in  the  antecedent  devices  in  general 
use  as  trade  signs.  Few  have  survived  to  the  present  day,  though  the  barber's  pole 
and  the  three  balls  of  the  pawnbroker  are  familiar  to  us  all.  In  the  same  way  the 
three  escutcheons  of  the  shield  worker  and  painter  were  universal  throughout  Europe, 
and  survive  in  the  arms  of  the  Painters  and  Paynter-Stayners  Companies.  These 
old  trade  devices,  with   more  or  less  modification,  have  given  the   basis  of  design 

X 


PREFACE 

when  by  incorporation  trade  bodies  have  been  called  into  being  competent  to  receive 
grants  or  confirmations  of  arms. 

It  is  a  matter  of  considerable  uncertainty  what  helmet  shall  be  used  with  an 
impersonal  coat  of  arms.  Personally  I  myself  think  it  is  greatly  to  be  regretted 
that  any  crest  has  ever  been  granted  to  an  impersonal  coat  of  arms.  Impersonal 
arms  originated  either  in  territorial  arms  of  sovereignty,  in  guild  devices,  or  in  flags. 
Putting  aside  the  first-named,  which  so  far  as  the  Sovereign  was  concerned  had 
a  personal  character,  there  was  neither  need,  nor  use,  nor  any  reason  for  the 
existence  of  helmet  or  crest.  None  of  the  ancient  impersonal  arms  had  crests,  and 
I  am  afraid  it  must  be  admitted  that  the  beginnings  of  crests  for  impersonal  coats 
lay  in  the  desire  of  the  Kings  of  Arms  to  grant  them,  but  behind  this  desire  lay, 
not  the  endeavour  to  extract  fees,  but  the  necessity  of  bringing  corporations  under 
their  control,  and  I  am  confident  that  the  bulk  of  these  early  grants  of  crests  were 
nothing  more  than  the  bait  to  tempt  corporations  to  acknowledge  authority  and 
record  the  arms  they  were  using.  The  grant  of  the  crest  created  the  opportunity  of 
recording  and  confirming  the  arms.  The  earliest  of  such  grants  date  from  the  fifteenth 
century,  a  period  before  rank  was  denoted  by  the  style  and  shape  of  the  helmet.  I 
know  of  no  rules  and  can  simply  state  the  facts  within  my  knowledge.  With  regard 
to  the  arms  of  Colonies,  very  few  date  back  to  the  Stuart  period.  I  have  never  seen 
a  Royal  Warrant  of  this  period  for  the  purpose.  I  very  much  doubt  if  an  original  is 
still  in  existence,  but  arms  of  Colonies  which  are  of  ancient  origin  appear  always  to 
be  represented  with  the  Royal  helmet.  This,  one  would  imagine,  is  correct;  there  is 
certainly  no  reason  why  any  other  helmet  should  be  used.  But  the  majority  of 
Colonial  arms  are  quite  modern.  I  can  call  nothing  to  mind  granted  between  the 
reign  of  Charles  II.  and  the  reign  of  Queen  Victoria.  The  modern  Colonial  warrants 
have  no  helmet  and  mantling  either  painted  upon  them  or  recited  in  the  wording  of 
the  warrant.  A  number  of  them  certainly  have  crests,  but  these  are  simply  placed 
on  wreaths  above  the  escutcheon  without  any  intervening  helmet  or  mantling.  From 
these  facts,  the  conclusion  I  draw  is,  that  the  correct  helmet  and  mantling  for 
a  colony  should  be  that  of  the  Sovereign,  and  I  shall  adhere  to  that  opinion  until 
I  come  across  an  actual  warrant  which  uses  a  different  helmet.  With  regard  to  the 
arms  of  counties,  it  should  be  remembered  that  until  the  passing  of  the  act  creating 
County  Councils  there  was  no  body  in  any  county  competent  to  bear  arms  or  to 
obtain  a  grant  of  arms.  But  in  Scotland  at  any  rate  a  grant  had  been  made  to 
"  The  County  of  Perth  "  and  to  the  commissioners  of  supply  for  the  County  of 
Renfrew.  These  grants  I  have  always  doubted  the  real  validity  of,  but  they  exist. 
Perth,  though  it  has  a  crest,  was  emblazoned  without  a  helmet.  Berwick  had  no 
crest,  but  Renfrew  was  emblazoned  with  the  helmet  of  an  esquire.  The  English 
counties,  of  course,  had  no  arms,  but  in  one  or  two  cases — for  example,  Kent  and 
Middlesex — arms  had  by  long  repute  been  attributed  to  counties,  but  in  no  case 
was  there  any  reputation  of  a  crest,  and  so  the  question  of  the  helmet  did  not 
arise.  After  the  passing  of  the  County  Councils  Act  the  first  council  in  England 
to  obtain  a  grant  for  the  county  was  West  Sussex  :  that  had  no  crest  and  con- 
sequently   no    helmet.       The    next     was     Shropshire,    which    likewise    and    very 

xi 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

properly  was  also  without  a  crest;  and  it  would  have  been  well  if  these  two 
precedents  had  stereotyped  the  absence  of  a  crest  as  proper  to  the  arms  of 
a  county.  The  next  county  to  obtain  a  grant  was  Lancashire,  which  in  the 
pride  of  its  wealth  went  for  arms,  crest,  and  supporters.  In  this  grant  the 
helmet  was  that  of  an  esquire,  and  this  grant  for  England,  and  the  grant  to 
Renfrew  for  Scotland,  have  fixed  and  determined  the  rule  that  the  proper 
helmet  for  a  county  is  that  of  an  esquire.  I  presume  it  would  be  the  same 
for  Ireland,  but  there  is  nothing  in  the  nature  of  arms  for  a  county  in  the 
kingdom  of  Ireland.  With  regard  to  the  arms  of  cities  and  towns,  for  some 
utterly  inexplicable  reason  the  right  to  a  knight's  helmet  is  always  conceded 
to  any  Scottish  city  or  town  when  it  matriculates  its  arms  ;  but  in  England  the 
helmet  for  a  city  or  town  is  always  that  of  an  esquire.  With  regard  to  other 
corporate  bodies  who  obtain  grants  of  arms,  the  rule  when  a  crest  is  granted  is 
that  the  helmet  shall  be  that  of  an  esquire,  and  this  rule  nowadays  is  always 
strictly  adhered  to ;  but  many  grants  in  the  sixteenth  and  seventeenth  centuries — 
for  example,  to  City  Livery  Companies — were  unquestionably  emblazoned  with 
the  helmet  of  a  peer.  I  should  myself  have  been  inclined  to  regard  these  as 
examples  of  the  use  of  helmets  before  any  rules  concerning  them  had  been  devised, 
were  it  not  that  Sir  Albert  Woods,  Garter  King  of  Arms,  who,  whatever  his  artistic 
faults,  and  they  were  many,  was  meticulously  accurate  in  these  matters  of  detail, 
certified  the  arms  of  the  Goldsmiths'  Company  under  a  painting  which  distinctly 
showed  the  helmet  of  a  peer.  This  may  have  been  intentional,  for  a  number  of 
the  mantlings  of  the  arms  of  these  City  Companies  are  lined  with  ermine.  Where 
I  have  known  this  to  be  the  case  I  have  noted  this  in  the  blazons.  No  university 
ever  had  a  crest  until  the  grant  in  1905  to  the  University  of  Leeds,  which  was 
followed  by  a  similar  grant  to  the  University  of  Wales.  The  emblazonments  of 
these  grants,  I  understand,  do  not  show  any  helmet  or  mantling.  I  think  it  is  a 
thousand  pities  that  the  tradition  that  no  university  has  a  crest  should  be  broken 
— universities  are  amongst  the  very  few  grants  in  which  the  motto  forms  a  part  of 
the  grant — but  as  it  has  been  broken,  one  can  only  say  that  there  is  no  reason 
for  supposing  that  the  helmet  can  be  anything  but  that  of  an  ordinary  esquire. 
The  only  exception  to  these  rules  as  to  the  use  of  helmets  lies  in  the  usage  by  the 
City  of  London  of  the  helmet  of  a  peer.  This  is  not  a  usage  for  which  there  is  a 
trace  of  official  authority,  and  this  point  is  dealt  with  under  the  arms  of  London. 

The  only  cities  which  to  my  knowledge  have  ever  used  a  fur  cap  over  the  shield 
of  arms  are  London,  Dublin,  York,  and  Norwich.  Of  York  I  can  say  nothing 
beyond  the  fact  that  in  many  representations  of  the  arms  I  have  seen  the  fur  cap. 
The  arms  of  Norwich  are  seldom  represented  without  it,  and  in  Norwich  the  fur  cap, 
which  in  this  case  is  black,  was  formerly  worn  by  the  Mayor  himself.  In  London  the 
fur  cap  is  actually  worn  by  the  sword-bearer,  and  there  is  nothing  to  show  that  it  was 
ever  worn  by  the  Mayor  ;  in  fact,  the  evidence  is  to  the  contrary.  The  earliest  instance 
in  which  it  is  found  is  a  case  about  the  year  1677,  where  it  figures,  not  over  the  shield, 
but  in  a  background  of  miscellaneous  municipal  insignia.  I  believe  it  is  there 
intended  to  indicate  the  cap  of  the  London  apprentice,  and  I  am  strongly  of  opinion, 


PREFACE 

that  if  we  had  any  certain  knowledge,  it  would,  in  the  case  of  London,  be  traceable 
to  such  an  origin  ;  possibly  through  a  mistaken  imitation  of  the  case  at  Norwich, 
where  there  would  appear  to  be  some  real  reason  and  foundation  for  its  use.  But 
there  is  not  a  trace  of  any  official  sanction  for  the  use  of  such  an  embellishment  by 
any  English  town.  The  case  of  Dublin  is  rather  different.  I  am  not  quite  sure  who 
actually  wears  the  garment  there,  but  the  late  Ulster  King  of  Arms,  Sir  Arthur 
Vicars,  K.C.V.O.,  wrote  to  me  that  he  would  have  no  hesitation  in  certifying  the 
arms  of  the  City  of  Dublin  with  this  cap,  and  for  that  reason  it  is  included,  as  it  is 
used,  in  the  illustration.  Whether  or  not  the  present  Ulster  King  of  Arms  holds  the 
same  view  I  am  quite  unaware,  but  there  "certainly  is  nothing  in  the  way  of  authority 
at  present  officially  recorded  for  it.  It  is  worthy  of  note  that  none  of  the  cities  I 
have  mentioned  have  any  crest,  consequently  there  is  no  reason  for  helmet  or 
mantling  to  surmount  the  arms,  and  the  absence  of  one  may  account  for  the 
presence  of  the  other.  The  City  of  London,  after,  even  for  official  purposes,  making 
great  use  for  the  last  hundred  years  of  the  fur  cap,  has  now  decided  to  discourage 
its  use,  and  prefer  on  all  occasions  its  bogus  crest. 

Widespread  as  is  the  use  of  the  mural  crown  in  connection  with  municipal  arms, 
there  was,  until  a  few  months  ago,  no  authority  whatever  for  its  use  in  this  country. 
Since  the  seventeenth  century  and  its  haphazard  granting  of  personal  crests  upon 
caps  of  maintenance  and  out  of  coronets  passed  away,  there  was  until  quite  recently 
an  unwritten  law  and  a  rigidly  enforced  practice  that  the  mural  crown  should  be 
exclusively  reserved  for  grants  of  crests  to  officers  of  the  army  of  the  rank  of  General, 
and  for  such  cases  the  mural  crown  has  been  religiously  reserved.  On  the  Continent 
however,  it  has  always  been  regarded  as  a  regular  adjunct  of  a  civic  coat  of  arms, 
some  writers  even  elaborating  rules  as  to  the  number  of  turrets  and  towers  to  be 
included  in  the  crown  according  to  the  rank  and  character  of  the  town  as  a  Royal 
residence,  capital  city,  fortified  town,  or  otherwise.  I  doubt  if  these  regulations  have 
any  real  authority,  but  one  does  come  across  them  conscientiously  asserted,  but  they 
had  no  acceptance  whatever  in  England,  Scotland,  or  Ireland,  where  the  rule  held 
which  I  have  quoted.  This  rule,  however,  has  now  gone  by  the  board,  for  Lyon  King 
of  Arms,  in  the  exercise  of  his  discretion,  but  which  I  cannot  but  think  was  a  very 
unfortunate  decision,  has  matriculated  in  his  register  the  arms  of  both  Paisley  and 
St  Andrews,  the  escutcheon  in  each  case  being  surmounted  by  a  mural  crown.  To 
Lyon  King  of  Arms  and  his  fearless  refusal  to  be  bound  by  convention  the 
heraldry  of  to-day  owes  much,  and  how  much  the  future  only  will  reveal,  but  I  cannot 
help  regretting  this  decision  of  his,  because  it  smashes  a  very  cherished  privilege  of 
army  grants.  Had  Lyon,  following  the  continental  practice,  introduced  the  walled 
and  turreted  crown  one  meets  with  in  Germany,  the  matter  might  have  been 
different,  but  he  has  matriculated  the  army  crown  pure  and  simple.  This  bad 
example  has  now  been  followed  by  the  College  of  Arms,  for  in  the  grant  of  arms 
to  the  London  County  Council  a  mural  crown  is  included.  In  this  case  it  was  done 
by  Royal  Licence.  It  is  to  be  hoped  that  Germany  will  not  regard  this  crown  as 
evidence  of  the  fortification  of  London. 

In  the  use  of  supporters  with  impersonal  arms  opinion  has  changed.    Supporters 

xiii 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

(but  not  those  now  in  use)  can  be  found  in  conjunction  with  the  arms  of  the  City  of 
London  at  a  period  when  it  is  at  any  rate  doubtful  whether  heraldic  supporters  were 
fully  established  as  part  of  an  achievement.  Supporters  to  the  arms  of  the  Livery 
Companies  are  found  very  earl)',  but  they  were  not  usual  with  the  arms  of  cities  and 
towns  until  the  seventeenth  century.  But  for  a  long  period  an  idea  held  in  England, 
and  was  uniformly  acted  upon,  that  supporters  were  the  sign  of  a  city  and  could  not 
be  granted  to  a  town  of  lesser  degree.  A  careful  examination  of  precedents  has 
shown  that  there  is  no  authority  or  foundation  for  such  a  supposed  rule,  and  as  far  as 
I  am  aware  supporters  will  now  be  granted  to  any  impersonal  coat  of  arms  on  payment 
of  the  usual  fees.  They  certainly  have  been  granted  to  some  colonies,  many  cities, 
some  towns,  some  counties,  and  a  large  number  of  institutions  and  corporate  bodies. 
But  I  do  not  know  of  any  instance  of  supporters  being  granted  to  an  episcopal  coat, 
a  university,  a  school,  or  a  railway  company.  Before  leaving  supporters  a  passing 
reference  perhaps  may  be  made  to  the  single  supporters  which  occur  in  the  arms  of 
the  Swiss  Cantons,  the  City  of  Perth,  and  the  Burgh  of  Falkirk.  The  blazon  of  this 
latter  coat,  and  that  of  the  Royal  Warrant  to  the  Bermudas,  are  rather  typical  of  the 
differing  Scottish  and  English  methods  of  dealing  with  the  same  situation. 

With  regard  to  wreaths,  one  can  only  say  the  usual  heraldic  practices  are 
generally  adopted,  although  the  City  of  Chester  gives  us  an  example  of  a  wreath  and 
mantling  each  of  three  colours,  and  in  the  cases  of  one  or  two  of  the  City  Livery 
Companies  the  colours  are  exceptional. 

Augmentations  in  the  case  of  impersonal  arms  are  rare.  The  arms  of  London- 
derry and  Hereford  are  instances  however,  and  I  cannot  but  think  it  would  be  a 
happy  proceeding  if  the  sieges  of  Ladysmith  and  of  Mafeking  were  commemorated 
by  augmentations. 

The  resuscitation  in  recent  years  of  the  old  practice  of  assigning  badges  and 
standards  has  in  a  few  cases  already  spread  to  impersonal  arms.  Launceston  was 
the  first,  and  Nottingham,  Llanelly,  and  the  Port  of  London  Authority  have  since 
followed  suit. 

Probably  by  far  the  most  important  alteration  that  has  taken  place  since  the 
previous  edition  was  published  has  been  the  authorisation  of  arms  for  Wales,  which 
is  presumably  a  consequence  of  the  Royal  Warrant  declaring  the  arms  of  the 
Prince  of  Wales,  which  has  substituted  the  arms  attributed  to  Llewellyn,  and  borne 
by  Owen  Glendower,  for  the  inescutcheon  of  Saxony,  which  most  of  the  descendants 
of  the  late  Prince  Consort  bear  upon  their  arms. 

In  addition  to  the  arms  of  Colonies  which  are  assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  this 
method  of  calling  arms  into  being  has  been  followed  in  the  cases  of  the  County  of 
Norfolk,  the  County  of  London,  the  City  of  Cardiff,  the  Port  of  London  Authority, 
and  several  others.  The  reason  is  usually,  if  not  always,  to  be  found  in  the  desire 
to  include  the  whole  or  some  part  of  the  Royal  Arms. 

The  years  which  followed  the  publication  of  the  original  edition  of  my  book 
contributed,  muchly  to  my  everlasting  amusement,  to  the  showers  of  abuse  which  fell 
upon  me  for  calling  attention  to  the  bogus  character  of  many  impersonal  coats 
of  arms.     Many  towns  which  I  then  criticised  are  now  pursuing  the  paths  of  heraldic 

xiv 


PREFACE 

virtue.  But  there  are  still  many  spurious  coats  of  arms  in  use,  and  one  cannot  help 
wondering  whether  it  might  not  be  possible  to  put  some  of  these  right  by  private 
initiative.  The  chairmen  of  at  least  two  County  Councils  paid  the  fees  for  grants 
of  arms  to  their  counties.  The  old  scholars  of  a  famous  Scottish  School  collected 
the  cost  of  a  matriculation  of  arms.  The  fees  on  a  recent  grant  to  a  famous  old 
town  were  raised  by  private  subscription.  I  know  of  a  number  of  such  cases,  and 
would  myself  cheerfully  subscribe  to  the  fees  for  grants  of  arms  to  be  made  to  the 
Boroughs  of  Much  Wenlock,  Cardigan,  and  Carmarthen,  and  to  the  Honourable 
Society  of  Lincoln's  Inn,  with  all  of  which  I  have  personal  associations.  Also  would 
I  subscribe  to  get  the  arms  matriculated  which  have  been  in  use  by  Inveraray  and 
New  Galloway.  I  have  never  been  near  either  place,  and  don't  know  that  I  want 
to  go,  but  the  two  coats  of  arms  interest  me,  particularly  the  alleged  Inveraray  arms, 
and  I  want  to  see  what  Lyon  King  of  Arms  would  do  with  them  and  what  Ulster 
will  do  with  the  arms  of  Waterford.  I  never  had  any  very  high  opinion  of  the 
Society  of  Antiquaries.  But  it  would  really  give  me  pleasure  to  subscribe  to  a  fund 
to  get  the  Society  a  genuine  coat  of  arms  and  bring  to  a  close  the  scandal  of  its 
present  heraldic  criminality. 

There  are  still  several  colonies  which  need  Royal  Warrants  to  be  issued  for 
the  assigning  of  arms  to  them,  and  I  would  like  to  see  arms  assigned  by  warrant  to 
Rhodesia,  with  authority  for  them  to  be  placed  on  a  monument  to  the  memory  of 
Cecil  Rhodes,  and  to  be  borne  by  the  Rhodes  family.  India  and  her  Provinces 
have  no  arms,  the  City  of  London  will  not  see  the  error  of  her  ways  ;  Newport, 
Swansea,  and  Carnarvon  have  all  yet  to  learn  righteousness.  The  Counties  and 
the  Episcopal  Sees  are  hotbeds  of  heraldic  iniquity. 

In  twenty  years  one's  friends  and  correspondents  change,  and  the  list  of  those 
to  whom  herein  I  make  my  acknowledgments  of  indebtedness  for  assistance  is  a 
different  list  from  the  one  which  figured  in  my  first  edition.  To  those  whose  names 
I  then  gave  my  indebtedness  still  remains,  and  is  remembered  with  gratitude  for 
the  help  which  then  enabled  me  to  call  this  book  into  being. 

A.  C.  FOX-DAVIES 


THE  ILLUSTRATIONS 

The  illustrations  in  the  present  volume  are  all  of  them  given  in  conjunction  with 
the  verbal  descriptions.  Perhaps  it  may  here  be  explained  also  that  the  attempt 
has  been  made  to  illustrate  every  British  coat  of  arms  which  is  still  in  use  amongst 
those  which  are  included  in  these  pages.  But  many  coats  of  arms  are  described 
which  are  those  of  corporate  bodies  long  since  extinct,  and  no  attempt  has  been 
made  to  illustrate  those. 

The  heraldry  of  impersonal  arms  is,  of  course,  the  same  science  of  heraldry 
that  is  described  in  many  text-books,  and  at  the  risk  of  being  again  accused 
of  never  losing  an  opportunity  of  advertising  my  own  books,  let  me  suggest  my 
"  Complete  Guide  to  Heraldry  "  as  a  text-book  which  will  probably  answer  most 
requirements  of  that  nature. 

The  illustrations,  following  the  prevailing  custom,  are  given  in  outline  only. 
Accompanied  as  these  illustrations  are  in  every  case  by  the  verbal  blazon,  any 
indication  of  colour  on  the  drawings  seems  unnecessary.  Most  of  those  who  will 
refer  to  this  book  will  know  the  elementary  rules  which  will  enable  the  blazon  to  be 
applied  to  the  illustration. 

In  fact,  little  more  is  necessary  than  a  knowledge  of  the  names  of  the  metals, 
colours,  and  furs.  "Or"  is  gold,  "argent"  is  silver,  "gules"  is  red,  "azure"  blue, 
"vert"  green,  "sable"  black,  and  "purpure"  purple.  Ermine  is  white  with  black 
spots,  "ermines"  black  with  white  spots.  "  Erminois"  has  a  gold  ground  with  black 
spots,  "  pean  "  is  a  black  ground  with  gold  spots. 

It  should  always  be  remembered  that  the  first  word  applies  to  the  colour  of 
the  shield. 

A  knowledge  of  the  ordinaries  is  useful,  but  as  a  drawing  always  accompanies 
the  blazon  this  is  hardly  essential ;  but  the  ordinary  rules  observed  in  relation  to 
blazon  will  repay  a  little  attention. 

The  word  "  Blazon  "  is  used  with  some  number  of  meanings,  but  practically  it 
may  be  confined  to  the  verb  "  to  blazon,"  which  is  to  describe  in  words  a  given  coat 
of  arms,  and  the  noun  "  blazon,"  which  is  such  a  description. 

Care  should  be  taken  to  differentiate  between  the  employment  of  the  term 
"  blazon  "  and  the  verb  "  to  emblazon,"  which    latter  means  to  depict  in  colour. 

It  may  be  here  remarked,  however,  that  to  illustrate  by  the  use  of  outline  with 
written  indications  of  colour  is  termed  "  to  trick,"  and  a  picture  of  arms  of  this 
character  is  termed  "  a  trick." 

The  rules  to  be  employed  in  blazon  are  simple,  and  comparatively  few  in 
number. 

The  commencement  of  any  blazon  is  of  necessity  a  description  of  the  field,  the 

xvii 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

one  word  signifying  its  colour  being  employed  if  it  be  a  simple  field  ;  or,  if  it  be 
composite,  such  terms  as  are  necessary.  Thus,  a  coat  divided  "per  pale"  or  "per 
chevron  "  is  so  described,  and  whilst  the  Scottish  field  of  this  character  is  officially 
termed  "  Parted "  [per  pale,  or  per  chevron],  the  English  equivalent  is  "  Party," 
though  this  word  in  English  usage  is  more  often  omitted  than  not  in  the  blazon 
which  commences  "  per  pale,"  or  "  per  chevron,"  as  the  case  may  be. 

In  a  "party"  coloured  field,  that  colour  or  tincture  is  mentioned  first  which 
occupies  the  more  important  part  of  the  escutcheon.  Thus,  in  a  field  "  per  bend," 
"  per  chevron,"  or  "  per  fess,"  the  upper  portion  of  the  field  is  first  referred  to  ;  in  a 
coat  "  per  pale,"  the  dexter  side  is  the  more  important ;  and  in  a  coat  "  quarterly," 
the  tinctures  of  the  ist  and  4th  quarters  are  given  precedence  of  the  tinctures  of  the 
2nd  and  3rd.  The  only  division  upon  which  there  has  seemed  any  uncertainty  is 
the  curious  one  "gyronny,"  but  the  method  employed  in  this  case  can  very  easily  be 
recognised  by  taking  the  first  quarter  of  the  field,  and  therein  considering  the  field 
as  if  it  were  simply  "  per  bend." 

After  the  field  has  been  described,  anything  of  which  the  field  is  sem6  is  next 
alluded  to,  e.g.  gules,  seme-de-lis  or,  etc. 

The  second  thing  to  be  mentioned  in  the  blazon  is  the  principal  charge.  We 
will  consider  first  those  cases  in  which  it  is  an  ordinary.  Thus,  one  would  speak  of 
"  Or,  a  chevron  gules,"  or,  if  there  be  other  charges  as  well  as  the  ordinary,  "  Azure, 
a  bend  between  two  horses'  heads  or,"  or,  "  Gules,  a  chevron  between  three  roses 
argent." 

The  colour  of  the  ordinary  is  not  mentioned  until  after  the  charge,  if  it  be  the 
same  as  the  latter,  but  if  it  be  otherwise  it  must  of  course  be  specified,  as  in  the  coat : 
"  Or,  a  fess  gules  between  three  crescents  sable."  If  the  ordinary  is  charged,  the 
charges  thereupon,  being  less  important  than  the  charges  in  the  field,  are  mentioned 
subsequently,  as  in  the  coat :  "  Gules,  on  a  bend  argent  between  two  fountains 
proper,  a  rose  gules  between  two  mullets  sable." 

The  position  of  the  charges  need  not  be  specified  when  they  would  naturally 
fall  into  a  certain  position  with  regard  to  the  ordinaries.  Thus,  a  chevron  between 
three  figures  of  necessity  has  two  in  chief  and  one  in  base.  A  bend  between  two 
figures  of  necessity  has  one  above  and  one  below.  A  fess  has  two  above  and  one 
below.  A  cross  between  four  has  one  in  each  angle.  In  none  of  these  cases  is  it 
necessary  to  state  the  position.  If,  however,  those  positions  or  numbers  do  not 
come  within  the  category  mentioned,  care  must  be  taken  to  specify  what  the  coat 
exactly  is. 

If  a  bend  is  accompanied  only  by  one  charge,  the  position  of  this  charge  must 
be  stated.  For  example  :  "  Gules,  a  bend  or,  in  chief  a  crescent  argent."  A  chevron 
with  four  figures  would  be  described  :  "  Argent,  a  chevron  between  three  escallops 
in  chief  and  one  in  base  sable,"  though  it  would  be  equally  correct  to  say  :  "  Argent, 
a  chevron  between  four  escallops,  three  in  chief  and  one  in  base  sable."  In  the  same 
way  we  should  get:  "Vert,  on  a  cross  or,  and  in  the  ist  quarter  a  bezant,  an  estoile 
sable "  ;  though,  to  avoid  confusion,  this  coat  would  more  probably  be  blazoned  : 
"  Vert,  a  cross  or,  charged  with  an  estoile  sable,  and  in  the  first  quarter  a  bezant." 

xviii 


THE   ILLUSTRATIONS 

This  example  will  indicate  the  latitude  which  is  permissible  if,  for  the  sake  of 
avoiding  confusion  and  making  a  blazon  more  readily  understandable,  some  deviation 
from  the  strict  formulas  would  appear  to  be  desirable. 

If  there  be  no  ordinary  on  a  shield,  the  charge  which  occupies  the  chief  position 
is  mentioned  first.  For  example  :  "Or,  a  lion  rampant  sable  between  three  boars' 
heads  erased  gules,  two  in  chief  and  one  in  base."  Many  people,  however,  would 
omit  any  reference  to  the  position  of  the  boars'  heads,  taking  it  for  granted  that,  as 
there  were  only  three,  they  would  be  2  and  i,  which  is  the  normal  position  of  three 
charges  in  any  coat  of  arms.  If,  however,  the  coat  of  arms  had  the  three  boars' 
heads  all  above  the  lion,  it  would  then  be  necessary  to  blazon  it :  "  Or,  a  lion  rampant 
sable,  in  chief  three  boars'  heads  erased  gules." 

•  When  a  field  is  seme  of  anything,  this  is  taken  to  be  a  part  of  the  field,  and  not 
a  representation  of  a  number  of  charges.  Consequently  the  arms  of  Long  are 
blazoned  :  "  Sable,  seme  of  cross  crosslets,  a  lion  rampant  argent."  As  a  matter  of 
fact  the  seme  of  cross  crosslets  is  always  termed  crttsilly. 

When  charges  are  placed  around  the  shield  in  the  position  they  would  occupy 
if  placed  upon  a  bordure,  these  charges  are  said  to  be  "  in  orle,"  as  in  the  arms : 
"  Quarterly,  azure  and  gules,  a  lion  rampant  erminois,  within  four  cross  crosslets 
argent,  and  as  many  bezants  alternately  in  orle";  though  it  is  equally  permissible 
to  term  charges  in  such  a  position  "  an  orle  of  \e.g.  cross  crosslets  argent  and  bezants 
alternately],"  or  so  many  charges  "  in  orle." 

If  an  ordinary  be  engrailed,  or  invected,  this  fact  is  at  once  stated,  the  term 
occurring  before  the  colour  of  the  ordinary.  Thus  :  "  Argent,  on  a  chevron  nebuly 
between  three  crescents  gules,  as  many  roses  of  the  field."  When  a  charge  upon  an 
ordinary  is  the  same  colour  as  the  field,  the  name  of  the  colour  is  not  repeated,  but 
those  charges  are  said  to  be  "  of  the  field." 

It  is  the  constant  endeavour,  under  the  recognised  system,  to  avoid  the  use  of 
the  name  of  the  same  colour  a  second  time  in  the  blazon.  Thus  :  "  Quarterly,  gules 
and  or,  a  cross  counterchanged  between  in  the  first  quarter  a  sword  erect  proper, 
pommel  and  hilt  of  the  second  ;  in  the  second  quarter  a  rose  of  the  first,  barbed  and 
seeded  of  the  third;  in  the  third  quarter  a  fleur-de-lis  azure;  and  in  the  fourth 
quarter  a  mviS}i&t gold" — the  use  of  the  term  "gold"  being  alone  permissible  in  such 
a  case. 

Any  animal ,  which  needs  to  be  described  also  needs  its  position  to  be 
specified.  It  may  be  rampant,  segreant,  passant,  statant,  or  trippant,  as  the 
case  may  be.  It  may  also  sometimes  be  necessarj'  to  specify  its  position  upon 
the  shield. 

With  the  exception  of  the  chief,  the  quarter,  the  canton,  the  flaunch,  and  the 
bordure,  an  ordinary  or  sub-ordinary  is  always  of  greater  importance,  and  therefore 
should  be  mentioned  before  any  other  charge  ;  but  in  the  cases  alluded  to  the  remainder 
of  the  shield  is  first  blazoned,  before  attention  is  paid  to  these  figures.  Thus  we  should 
get :  "  Argent,  a  chevron  between  three  mullets  gules,  on  a  chief  of  the  last  three 
crescents  of  the  second  " ;  or  "  Sable,  a  lion  rampant  between  three  fleurs-de-lis  or, 
on  a  canton  argent  a  mascle  of  the  field  "  ;  or,  "Gules,  two  chevronels  between  three 

:(ix 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

mullets  pierced  or,  within  a  bordure  engrailed   argent    charged    with    eight    roses 
of  the  field." 

If  two  ordinaries  or  sub-ordinaries  appear  in  the  same  field,  certain  discretion 
needs  to  be  exercised,  but  the  arms  of  Fitzwalter,  for  example,  are  as  follows :  "  Or 
a  fess  between  two  chevrons  gules." 

When  charges  are  placed  in  a  series  following  the  direction  of  any  ordinary  they 
are  said  to  be  "  in  bend,"  "in  chevron,"  or  "  in  pale,"  as  the  case  may  be,  and  not 
only  must  their  position  on  the  shield  as  regards  each  other  be  specified,  but 
their  individual  direction  must  also  be  noted. 

A  coat  of  arms  in  which  three  spears  were  placed  side  by  side,  but  each  erect, 
would  be  blazoned  :  "  Gules,  three  tilting-spears  palewise  in  fess  "  ;  but  if  the  spears 
were  placed  horizontally,  one  above  the  other,  they  would  be  blazoned  :  "  Three 
tilting-spears  fesswise  in  pale,"  because  in  the  latter  case  each  spear  is  placed 
fesswise,  but  the  three  occupy  in  relation  to  each  other  the  position  of  a  pale.  Three 
tilting-spears  fesswise  which  were  not  in  pale  would  be  depicted  2  and  i. 

When  one  charge  surmounts  another,  the  undermost  one  is  mentioned  first. 

In  the  cases  of  a  cross  and  of  a  saltire,  the  charges  when  all  are  alike  would 
simply  be  described  as  between  four  objects,  though  the  term  "cantonned  by  "  four 
objects  is  sometimes  met  with.  If  the  objects  are  not  the  same,  they  will  be  specified 
as  being  in  the  ist,  2nd,  or  3rd  quarters,  if  the  ordinary  be  a  cross.  If  it  be  a  saltire, 
it  will  be  found  that  in  Scotland  the  charges  are  mentioned  as  being  in  chief  and  base, 
and  in  the  "  flanks."  In  England  they  would  be  described  as  being  in  pale  and  in  fess 
if  the  alternative  charges  are  the  same ;  if  not,  they  would  be  described  as  in  chief, 
on  the  dexter  side,  on  the  sinister  side,  and  in  base. 

When  a  specified  number  of  charges  is  immediately  followed  by  the  same 
number  of  charges  elsewhere  disposed,  the  number  is  not  repeated,  the  words  "as 
many "  being  substituted  instead.  Thus :  "  Argent,  on  a  chevron  between  three 
roses  gules,  as  many  crescents  of  the  field."  When  any  charge,  ordinary,  or  mark  of 
cadency  surmounts  a  single  object,  that  object  is  termed  "  debruised "  by  that 
ordinary.  If  it  surmounts  everything,  as,  for  instance,  "  a  bendlet  sinister,"  this 
would  be  termed  "over  all."  When  a  coat  of  arms  is  "party"  coloured  in  its  field 
and  the  charges  are  alternately  of  the  same  colours  transposed,  the  term  counter- 
changed  is  used.  For  example,  "  Party  per  pale  argent  and  sable,  three  chevronels 
between  as  many  mullets  pierced  all  counterchanged."  In  that  case  the  coat  is 
divided  down  the  middle,  the  dexter  field  being  argent,  and  the  sinister  sable;  the 
charges  on  the  sable  being  argent,  whilst  the  charges  on  the  argent  are  sable. 


XX 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
AACHEN.     Refer  to  Aix-Ia-Chapelle. 

AARGAU  (Switzerland).  Per  pale  dexter,  argent,  a  fess  wavy  sable  ;  sinister, 
azure,  three  mullets  of  five  points  argent. 

ABERAVON  (Glamorganshire).  Has  no  arms.  "...  four  lions  rampant  two 
and  two  ..."  have  been  attributed  to  the  town,  but  the  editor  is  not  aware  of 
the  least  authority  for  them,  and  does  not  know  from  what  source  they  have 
been  derived. 

ABERCHIRDER  (Banffshire).  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  shows  a  cross  patee  which 
is  said  to  be  azure  upon  an  argent  field. 

ABERDEEN,  The  Council  of  the  County  of.  Has  for  ensigns  armorial  the 
following,  viz.,  Quarterly  first  azure,  three  garbs  or,  for  Buchan  ;  .'^econd  azure, 
a  bend  between  six  cross  crosslets  fitchee  or,  for  Mar  ;  third  or,  a  fesse  chequy 
azure  and  argent  between  three  open  crowns  gules,  for  Garioch  ;  fourth  azure 
three  boars'  heads  couped  or,  for  Gordon. 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Office  the  nth  day  of  July  1890.] 

ABERDEEN,  The  City  of.  The  entry  in  Lyon  Register  is  as  follows  :—"  The 
Royall  Burgh  of  Aberdein  gives  for  his  Ensigncs  Armoriall  Gules,  three  towers, 
triple-towered  within  a  double  tressure  counter-flowered  argent  supported  by 
two  leopards  proper.  The  Motto  in  ane  escroll  '  Bon-Accord.'  And  upon  the 
reverse  of  ye  Seall  of  ye  said  Burgh  is  insculped  In  a  field  azur  a  Temple 
argent  St  Nicholas  standing  in  ye  porch  mytred  &  Vested  proper  with  his 
dexter  hand  lifted  up  to  heaven  praying  over  three  Children  in  a  boiyling  caldron 
of  the  first  and  holding  in  ye  sinister  a  Crosier  Or." 

(A  pencil  note  in  the  margin  says,  "  St.  Nicholas  :  v.  original  patent  by  Sir 
C.  Erskine,  Lyon,  in  possession  of  the  Corporation  of  A.")  Burke  in  his 
"  General  Armory  "  adds,  "  The  honourable  augmentation  of  the  double  tressure 
was  granted  as  a  recompense  for  the  loyalty  of  the  citizens  of  Aberdeen,  in 
their  services  against  the  English."  This  Grant,  dated  25th  Feb.  1674,  is  printed 
in  Seton's  "  Law  and  Practice  of  Heraldry  in  Scotland,"  p.  511. 

ABERDEEN,  University  of.     See  University  of  Aberdeen. 


COUNTY  OF  ABERDEEN 


AARGAU 


CITY  OF  ABERDEEN 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ABERDEEN,  See  of.  Azure,  in  the  porch  of  a  church  St  Nicholas  in  pontificals, 
his  right  hand  raised  over  three  children  in  a  cauldron  surrounded  by  flames,  in 
the  left  hand  a  pastoral  staff,  all  proper  (Woodward). 

[This  coat  was  never  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register.] 

ABERDEEN,  The  Constable  of.     Argent,  a  sword  and  key  in  saltire  gules. 

[These    arms,  on  an   escutcheon  of  pretence,  were   matriculated  in    Lyon 
Register,  c.  1C72-7,  by  Forbes  of  Waterton.] 

ABERDEEN   AND  ORKNEY,  Bishop  of.     According  to  Crockford  the  arms 
in  use  are  per  pale,  dexter  the  supposed  arms  of  the  See  of  Aberdeen,  sinister 
the  arms  of  the  See  of  Orkney,  to  which  refer. 
[There  is  no  authority  for  the  foregoing.] 

ABERDEEN  GRAMMAR  SCHOOL  (Aberdeen).  Has  no  arms.  Those  in  use 
are  :  Per  pale  gules,  a  castle  triple  towered  ;  impaling  gules  a  sword  paleways 
proper  between  three  padlocks  argent  (these  being  supposed  to  be  the  arms  of  a 
chief  benefactor  of  the  School,  Dr  Patrick  Dun,  Principal  of  Marischal  College), 
on  a  chief  argent,  a  saltire  azure  charged  with  a  book  proper.  Mottoes — (over 
crest)  "  Bon  record,"  (under  arms)  "  Ratio  confirmatioque  doctrinae." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

ABERDEEN  TOWN  AND  COUNTY  BANKING  COMPANY.  Gules,  a 
bezant  or,  between  two  towers  triple  towered  argent,  masoned  sable  in  chief,  and 
a  garb  of  the  second  in  base.  Motto  (over  shield) — "  Fide  et  industria." 
Supporters — (Dexter)  a  leopard,  (sinister)  a  stag,  both  proper. 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  3rd  Nov.  1863.     This  Banking  Co.  is  now 
amalgamated  with  the  North  of  Scotland  Co.,  to  which  refer.] 

ABERDEEN,  Trades  Incorporations  of.  The  different  Trades  incorporations 
of  Aberdeen  matriculated  their  arms  in  Lyon  Register  in  1682.  Refer  to 
Bakers,  Butchers,  Hammermen,  Shoemakers,  Tailors,  Weavers,  Wrights  and 
Coopers. 

ABERFELDY.     Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 

ABERGAVENNY,  Borough  of.  Gules,  a  saltire  argent,  between  a  rose  in  chief 
and  two  fleurs-de-lis  in  fesse  and  a  portcullis  chained  in  base  or.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  upon  the  trunk  of  a  tree  fessewise  eradicated  and 
sprouting  to  the  dexter  proper,  a  bull  passant  argent,  pied  and  unguled  sable, 
gorged  with  a  collar  and  chain  reflexed  over  the  back  and  charged  on  the  body 
with  two  fleurs-de-lis  or.     Motto — "  Hostes  nunc  amici." 

[Granted  27th  March  1901.] 

These  arms  are  obviously  based  upon  the  arms,  crest  and  badges  of  the 
Marquess  of  Abergavenny. 

4 


ABERDEEN,  SEE  OF 


ABERDEEN  GRAMMAR  SCHOOL 


ABERGAVENNY 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
ABERNETHY  (Fifeshire).     Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 

ABERSYCHAN  (Monmouthshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings;  and  to  its  credit 
has  not  invented  any,  though  the  accessories  of  its  landscape  design  "sail  rather 
near  the  wind." 

ABERYSTWITH  (Cardiganshire).  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  represents  a  castle 
with  the  legend  "  Corporation  of  Aberystwith."  Another  seal  represents 
"...  a  lion  rampant  regardant  ..."  and  by  some  this  is  stated  to  be  the 
arms  of  the  town. 


ABINGDON    (Berkshire).     Vert,  a  cross  patonce  or,  between  four  crosses  pattee 
:nt. 
[Confirmed  to  the  borough  at  the  Visitation  of  the  county  in  the  year  1623.] 


argent. 


ABINGDON  SCHOOL.     Gules,  a  griffin  segreant  argent,  between  the  figures  15  in 
chief  and  63  in  base.     Motto — "  Misericordias  Domini  in  aeternum  cantabo." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

ABYSSINIA.  Azure,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert,  a  lion  statantguardant  and  crowned 
or,' holding  erect  in  his  dexter  paw  a  crucifi.x  of  thejast. 

Berry,  in  his  "Encyclopaedia  of  Heraldry,"  however,  blazons  the  arms  of 
Abyssinia  as  follows  : — 

An  a  lion  rampant  gu.  holding  erect,  in  his  dexter  paw,  a  crucifix  or  ;  in 
chief,  a  scroll  with  this  motto,  "  Vivit  Leo  de  Tribu  Juda." 

ACADEMY  OF  THE  MUSES,  in  Covent  Garden,  London,  called  "Muses 
Mannerey."  Argent,  two  bars  wavy  azure,  on  a  chief  of  the  second,  a  music- 
book  open  or,  between  two  swords  in  saltire  of  the  first  hilted  and  pommelled 
of  the  third.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  Sagittarius  in  full  speed  proper, 
shooting  with  a  bow  or,  and  arrow  argent.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  merman 
with  two  tails  both  proper,  (sinister)  a  satyr  proper.  Motto — "  Nihil  inviata 
Minerva." 

[Granted  by  Borough,  Garter.] 


^Wt-^TH 


^ 


12^ 


^ 


ABINGDON  (BERKSHIRE) 


ABINGDON  SCHOOL 


ABYSSINIA 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ACADEMY,  Royal  Irish.  Argent  within  a  wreath  of  three  laurel  branches 
slipped  proper,  on  an  escutcheon  of  pretence  azure  the  ancient  Harp  of  Ireland 
or.  Crest — The  Georgian  Sidus  argent  charged  with  a  cross  gules  issuing  from 
an  Ancient  Crown  or.     Supporters  and  motto  as  next  grant. 

[Granted  by  Wm.  Hawkins,  Ulster  King  of  Arms,  April  1 1,  17S6.  Cancelled, 
and  a  new  coat  with  same  crest  differently  described  and  same  supporters  and 
motto  regranted  as  under.] 

ACADEMY,  Royal  Irish.  Argent,  a  saltire  gules,  charged  with  the  imperial  crown 
of  England  proper.  Crest — Out  of  a  pointed  or  Irish  crown  or,  an  etoile  of 
eight  points  argent,  charged  with  a  cross  gules.  Supporters — On  the  dexter 
a  female  figure  representing  Liberty,  holding  in  her  right  hand  a  wand,  thereon 
a  cap  gules,  on  the  sinister  a  figure  of  Minerva,  holding  in  her  right  a  lance, 
and  in  the  left  a  scroll.     Motto — "  We  will  endeavour." 

[Granted  9th  May  1840,  by  Sir  William  Betham,  Ulster  King  of  Arms.] 

ACCOUNTANTS.  Refer  to  Incorporated  Accountants  and  to  Bury,  Accountants' 
Institute  of. 

ACCOUNTANTS,  Institute  of  Chartered  (in  England  and  Wales).  Argent, 
on  a  mount  in  base,  in  front  of  a  rudder  in  bend  sinister,  a  female  figure  proper 
representing  "  Economy,"  habited  gules,  mantled  azure,  about  the  temples  a 
wreath  of  olive,  in  the  dexter  hand  a  rod,  and  in  the  sinister  a  pair  of  compasses 
also  proper ;  a  chief  of  the  second  thereon  a  balance  suspended  also  or.  Motto 
— "  Recte  numerare." 

[Granted  22nd  Jan.  1881.] 

ACCOUNTANTS  OF  AUSTRALIA,  Corporation  of.  Argent,  two  pens  in  saltire, 
surmounted  by  an  open  book  proper,  on  a  chief  arched  per  pale  azure  and  sable 
to  the  dexter  a  rising  sun  issuing  from  a  bank  of  clouds  also  proper,  to  the 
sinister  five  stars  or  representing  the  constellation  of  the  Southern  Cross.  Crest 
— On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  an  antique  ink-horn,  the  lid  raised  proper.  Motto 
— "  Nee  timens  nee  favens." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  October  30,  1905.] 

ACCRA,  See  of.  Or,  issuant  from  the  base  a  palm  tree  between  on  the  dexter  side 
the  letters  I.H.S.  and  on  the  sinister  a  mitre;  on  a  chief  sable,  three  ducal 
coronets. 

[Of  no  authority.] 


ROYAL  IRISH  ACADEMY 


INSTITUTE  OF  CHARTERED  ACCOUNTANTS 


ACCOUNTANTS  OF  AUSTRALIA 


ACCRA,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ACCRINGTON  (Lancashire).  Gules,  on  a  fesse  argent,  a  shuttle  fessewise  proper 
in  base  two  printing  cylinders,  issuant  therefrom  a  piece  of  calico  (parsley 
pattern)  also  proper,  on  a  chief  per  pale  or  and  vert,  a  lion  rampant  purpure, 
and  a  stag  current  or ;  and  for  the  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  an  oak 
branch  bent  from  the  sinister  chevronwise,  sprouting  and  leaved  proper,  fructed 
or  ;  with  the  Motto,  "  Industry  and  prudence  conquer." 

[Granted  August  26,  1879,  by  Sir  Albert  William  Woods,  Garter  Principal 
King  of  Arms,  Robert  Laurie,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms,  and  Walter  Aston 
Blount,  Norroy  King  of  Arms.] 

ACHONRY.     Refer  to  Tuam,  Killala  and  Achonry,  Bishop  of 

ADELAIDE,  See  of  (Australia).     Argent,  on  a  cross  between  four  estoiles  gules, 
a  mitre  enfiling  a  pastoral  staff  in  pale  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

ADMIRALTY  OFFICE.  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  of  the  Office  is  an  anchor  in 
pale  with  a  cable  passing  from  the  ring  and  environing  the  stock  and  fluke. 
Legend — "  Sigil.  offi.  admiral  Magna  Britan." 

The  foregoing  device,  painted  gold  on  a  blue  field,  has  often  been  supposed 
to  be  the  arms  of  the  Admiralty.  The  flag  of  the  Admiralty  or  the  Lord  High 
Admiral  is  red  with  an  anchor  fesseways,  the  beam  to  the  hoist  and  with  a 
cable  passing  through  the  ring  and  environing  the  stock  and  fluke. 

ADVENTURERS.  Refer  to  "Bristol  Merchant  Adventurers,"  to  "Miners' 
Royal,"  and  to  "  Mine  Adventurers,"  and  see  under. 

ADVENTURERS,  New,  or  French  Merchants.  Barry  wavy  of  six  argent  and 
azure,  a  chief  quarterly  gules  and  or,  in  the  first  and  fourth,  a  lion  passant 
guardant  of  the  last,  in  the  second  and  third  two  roses  gules,  seeded  or,  barbed 
vert ;  over  all  on  an  inescutcheon  azure,  a  sceptre  in  pale  or.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  two  anchors  in  saltire  and  a  sceptre  in  pale  all  or. 
Srifporters — Two  pegasi  argent,  with  wings  indorsed  or,  maned  and  hoofed  of 
the  last.     Motto — "  Reddite  cuique  suum." 

[These  arms  were  granted  13th  November  1616  by  Sir  William  Segar, 
Garter,  and  William  Camden,  Clarenceux.] 

ADVENTURERS,  Merchant,  or  Hambrough  Merchants.  (This  Society  was 
incorporated  24  Edw.  I.,  1296,  and  obtained  ample  privileges,  and  a  confirmation 
of  their  charter  from  Queen  Elizabeth.)  Barry  nebulae  of  six  argent  and 
azure,  a  chief  quarterly  gules  and  or,  in  the  first  and  fourth  quarters  a  lion 
passant  guardant  of  the  fourth,  in  the  second  and  third  two  roses  gules  barbed 
vert.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  pegasus  current  with  wings  indorsed 
argent.  Supporters — Two  pegasi  with  wings  indorsed  argent,  each  charged  on 
the  wing  with  three  roses  in  pale  gules.  Motto — "  Dieu  nous  adventure  donne 
bonne." 


ACCRINGTON 


ADELAIDE,  SEE  OF  (AUSTRALIA) 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ADVOCATES,  Dean  and  Faculty  of  (Scotland).  Gules,  a  balance  or,  and  a  sword 
argent  hilted  and  pommelled  of  the  second  placed  saltirewise,  surmounted  of  an 
escutcheon  also  of  the  second,  charged  with  a  lion  rampant,  within  a  double 
treasure  flory,  counterflory  of  the  first.  In  an  escroll  above  the  shield  is  inscribed 
this  motto,  "  Suum  cuique,"  and  surrounding  the  whole  achievement  is  a  belt 
azure,  buckled  and  edged  or,  having  thereon  these  words,  "  Sigillum  facultatis 
juridicse." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  6th  Feb.  1856.] 

AFRICA.  Refer  to  Union  of  South  Africa  and  British  West  Africa  and  East 
Africa  Protectorate  ;  and  see  also  British  South  Africa  Company,  Cape  Colony, 
Natal,  Transvaal,  Orange  River  Colony,  Cape  Town,  Johannesburg,  Pretoria ; 
Scotland,  Company  of,  trading  to  Africa  and  the  Indies  ;  and  see  Central  Africa, 
See  of;  and  East  Equatorial  Africa,  See  of. 

AFRICAN  COMPANY,  The  Royal.  (Incorporated  20th  January  1662.)  Or,  an 
elephant  azure,  on  his  back  a  quadrangular  castle  argent,  masoned  proper ;  on 
the  sinister  tower  a  flag-staff  and  banner  gules,  on  the  dexter  corner  of  the 
banner  a  canton  argent,  charged  with  a  cross  gules,  on  the  dexter  corner  of  the 
escutcheon  a  canton  quarterly  of  France  and  England.  Crest — On  a  ducal 
coronet  or,  an  anchor  erect  sable,  cabled  of  the  first  between  two  dragons'  wings 
expanded  argent,  each  charged  with  a  cross  gules.  Supporters — Two  African 
blacks  proper,  vested  round  the  waist  with  a  skirt  argent,  pearls  in  their  ears 
and  round  their  necks,  banded  round  the  temples  or,  thereon  feathers  erect  of 
various  Colours,  each  holding  in  his  exterior  hand  an  arrow  or,  barbed  and 
flighted  argent.  Motto — "  Regio  floret  patrocinio  commercium  commercioque 
regnum." 

[Not  recorded.] 

AGHADOR.     Refer  to  Limerick,  Ardfert  and  Aghador,  Bishop  of 

AGRAM  (Hungary).  Azure,  behind  an  embattled  wall  argent,  a  mound  proper, 
thereon  a  triple-towered  castle  in  perspective,  also  argent  between  flowers  on 
either  side. 

AIRDRIE  (Lanarkshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  Those 
used  are  for  arms,  argent,  an  eagle  displayed  with  two  heads  sable,  in  chief  a 
crescent  .  .  .  between  two  mullets  pierced.  Crest — A  cock  proper.  Motto — 
"  Vigilantibus."     These  arms  are  taken  from  those  of  Aitchison. 

AIX-LA-CHAPELLE  (Germany).     Argent,  an  eagle  displayed  sable. 


12 


DEAN  AND  FACULTY  OF  ADVOCATES 


AGRAM 


AIX-LA-CHAPELLE 


AIRDRIE 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ALAMODES,  RENFORCE  AND  LUTESTRINGS,  Patentees  for  the  Making 
and  Dressing  of.     Refer  to  Patentees. 

ALBAN  HALL,  Oxford.     Has  no  arms. 

ALBANIA.  The  arms  adopted  by  the  newly-elected  Sovereign  were  a  double-headed 
eagle  displayed  sable,  holding  in  each  claw  a  thunderbolt  and  charged  upon  the 
breast  with  an  escutcheon  argent,  thereon  a  peacock  in  his  pride  proper  within 
a  bordure  compony  sable  (}  gules)  and  argent.     Motto — "  Fidelitate  et  veritate." 

ALBANS,  ST     See  St  Albans. 

ALBERTA,  Province  of,   Dominion  of  Canada.     Azure,  in  front  of  a  range  of 
snow  mountains  proper,  a  range  of  hills  vert,  in  base  a  wheatfield  surmounted  by 
a  prairie  both  also  proper,  on  a  chief  argent,  a  St  George's  Cross. 
[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  30th  May  1907.] 

ALDEBURGH  (Suffolk).  Has  no  armorial  bearings ;  but  William  Hervey, 
Clarenceu.x  King  of  Arms,  granted  October  20,  1561,  to  the  corporation  for  a 
seal  the  following,  namely,  A  ship  of  three  masts  in  full  sail  on  the  waves 
of  the  sea,  the  mainsail  charged  with  a  lion  rampant. 

ALDERNEY.  Refer  to  Channel  Islands.  The  device  published  by  the  Admiralty 
is  vert,  a  lion  rampant  or,  crowned  gules,  holding  in  his  dexter  paw  a  sprig  of 
oak  proper. 

ALDERSHOT  (Hampshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  arms  attributed  to 
it  are,  azure,  an  alder-tree  eradicated  proper,  on  a  chief  gules,  three  heaps  of  shot. 
It  is  a  bogus  coat,  and  very  bad  heraldry,  but  a  very  good  pun. 

ALESSANDRIA  (Italy).     Argent,  a  cross  gules. 

ALGOMA,  See  of  (Canada).     Azure,  a  pastoral  staff  and  key  in  saltire  or,  sur- 
mounted   in   the  fesse  point   by  an   open   book  between  in  chief  an    Imperial 
crown  and  in  base  a  sprig  of  maple  of  three  leaves  proper. 
•    [Of  no  authority.] 


14 


ALBERTA 


ALDERSHOT 


ALESSANDRIA 


ALGOMA,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ALL  SOULS  COLLEGE     (The  College  of  the  Souls  of  Faithful  People  de- 
ceased)  (Oxford).      (Founded,     1437,   by    Henry    Chicheley,    Archbishop    of 
Canterbury.)     Or,  a  chevron  between  three  cinquefoils  gules. 
[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms,  Visitation  of  O.xford,  1574.] 

ALLOA,  Burgh  of  (Clackmannanshire).  Argent,  on  the  waves  of  the  sea,  an 
ancient  galley  sable,  in  full  sail,  the  sail  charged  with  the  arms  of  the  Earls 
of  Mar  and  Kellie,  pennon  gules,  flag  of  the  field  charged  with  a  pale  of  the 
second,  on  a  chief  vert,  in  the  dexter  a  garland,  the  dexter  half  hops,  the 
sinister  barley  all  or,  and  in  the  sinister  a  golden  fleece.  Mantling — Sable, 
doubled  argent.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  their  liveries,  a  griffin  gules,  winged, 
armed  and  beaked  or,  langued  azure,  and  on  an  escroll  over  the  same  this 
motto — "  In  the  forefront." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  nth  June  1902.  The  fees  were  defrayed 
by  the  Earl  of  Mar  and  Kellie  as  a  commemoration  of  the  coronation  of  King 
Edward  VII.] 

ALMSHOUSES.     Refer  to  Sekford's  Almshouses. 

ALNWICK  (Northumberland).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the 
County  Council  of  Northumberland  (118)  displays  as  the  arms  of  Alnwick,  St 
Michael  overcoming  the  dragon.  The  shield  of  St  Michael  is  charged  with  a 
cross  clechee  instead  of  the  ordinary  cross  similar  to  that  of  St  George. 

ALSACE.     Refer  to  Strasburg,  Bishopric  of 

ALSACE-LORRAINE  (Germany).  An  eagle  displayed  sable,  beaked  and  legged 
gules  surmounted  by  the  Imperial  crown,  on  its  breast  an  escutcheon  surmounted 
by  a  Royal  crown  and  per  pale,  the  dexter  side  per  fesse  ;  in  chief  gules  a  bend 
between  six  crowns  or;  in  base  gules  a  bend  flory,  counter-flory  argent;  the 
sinister  side  or,  on  a  bend  gules,  three  alerions  argent. 

ALTONA  (Prussia).  Gules,  issuant  from  waves  of  the  sea  in  base  a  battlementcd 
gateway,  the  porte  ouverte,  surmounted  by  three  towers. 


16 


ALL  SOULS  COLLEGE 


ALLOA 


ALTONA 


ALSACE-LORRAINE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ALTRINCHAM  (or  Altringham,  Cheshire).     Has  no  armorial  beai 
used  are,   quarterly  gules  and  or,  in  the    first  quarter  a  lion    pass. 
The  editor  suggests  that  these  are  the  arms  of  the  Cheshire  family  l 
Motto — "Pax  et  abundantia." 

ALVA.     Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 

ALYTH  (Co.  Forfar).     Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 

AMERICA,  United  States  of.  Arms  (on  the  seal  of  the  United  States),  an  eagle 
displayed,  in  the  dexter  claw  an  olive  branch,  and  in  the  sinister  a  sheaf  of  three 
arrows,  the  points  upwards,  all  proper,  from  the  beak  a  scroll,  or  ribbon,  thereon 
"  E plurilms  uimm  "  :  above  the  head,  encircled  by  clouds,  also  proper,  the  azure 
sky  and  glory,  with  as  many  mullets,  or  stars,  of  six  points  argent  as  there  are 
States  :  on  the  body  of  the  eagle  a  shield  paly  of  thirteen  (in  allusion  to  the 
thirteen  first  United  States)  argent  and  gules,  a  chief  azure. 

[The  stars  and  stripes  were  suggested  by  the  arms  of  George  Washington. 
The  arms  as  above  quoted  exist  by  original  legislative  enactment,  and  the  glory 

JjN^OTigjnally  opnsisted  of  thiflteen  stars.  Though  additional  States  have  from  time 
to  time  been  admitted  to  the  Union  there  has  been  no  further  legislative  action, 

V.  and  consequently  there  is  no  real  authority  for  any  increase  in  the  number  of 
stars  The  stars,  however,  are  now  more  usually  omitted  from  about  the  lisad  of 
'.:he  Eagle,  a;)J  represented  to  the  number  of  over  forty  on  the  chief,  whi'  'ike 
mo'^t  othei  /'uneiiran  heraldry,  is  absurd.  According  to  the  latest  bullf  .lere 
are  now  foiiy-eight  in  six  rows  each  of  eight  stars.] 

'AMERICAN  COLOi^ftAL   A3rX'CIATI0N,  North.     Refer  to  North  Amerie/in 

:    Colonial  Association. 

—  ■> 

j\MERICAN  LAND  CO.     Rcl.r  to  British  American  Land  Co. 

AMICABLE  SOCIETY.  (Incoip.-rated  by  Royal  Charter  of  Queen  Anne,  1706.) 
Azure,  encircled  by  a  snake  the  tail  in  the  mouth  or,  two  hands  conjoined  in 
fesse  couped  above  the  wrists  proper,  on  a  chief  embattled  of  the  second  an  hour 
glass  sable  between  two  wings  expanded  of  the  field.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  a  snake  nowed,  the  head  towards  the  sinister,  thereon  a  dove  propc,  from 
the  beak  an  escroU  with  the  motto  "  Prudens  Simplicitas."  Motto — Ben«ah  the 
arms,  "  Esto  perpetua." 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms,  Gts.  xxiv.  335. J 

AMIENS  (France).  Gules,  a  tree  eradicated  and  leaved  argent,  a  chief  a^ure, 
seme-de-lis  or. 


18 


UNITED    STATES  OF  AMERICA 


AMIENS 


ALTRINCHAM 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

AMSTERDAM  (Holland).  Gules,  on  a  pale  sable,  three  saltires  couped  argent. 
Supporters — Two  lions  guardant  or. 

Since  1508  the  shield  has  been  surmounted  by  the  Roman  German 
Imperial  Crown,  in  accordance  with  the  Patent  granted  by  Maximilian  I., 
February  11,  1489. 

ANCONA  (Italy).  Gules,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert,  a  chevalier  at  full  speed  armed 
cap-a-pie,  brandishing  in  his  dexter  hand  a  sword  all  proper,  on  a  chief  azure, 
three  fleurs-de-lis  or,  separated  by  the  files  of  a  label  of  four  points  gules. 

ANDORRA,  Republic  of.  Quarterly,  i,  argent,  a  mitre  or  ;  2,  or,  three  pallets  gules  ; 
3,  gules,  a  crosier  argent,  the  head  or  ;  4,  or,  two  bulls  passant  in  pale  gules, 
collared  and  belled  argent. 


20 


AMSTERDAM 


Lie   ) 


ANCONA 


ANDORRA 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ANDOVER  (Hampshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Its  seal,  recorded  in  the 
College  of  Arms,  represents  upon  a  mount  a  lion  statant  guardant,  in  front 
of  a  tree.  The  legend  is"Sigill.  commvne  ville  de  Andever,"  and  this  is  all  that 
appears  to  be  claimed  for  the  said  town  in  Debrett's  "  House  of  Commons,"  but 
Burke's  "  General  Armory"  quotes  it  as  a  coat-of-arms,  namely,  "Ar.  on  amount 
vert  a  lion  statant  guard,  gu.  against  a  tree  ppr." 

ANDREWS,  ST.     See  St  Andrews. 

ANDREWS,  ST,  University  of.     See  University  of  St  Andrews. 

ANGERS  (France).  Gules,  a  key  in  pale  wards  upwards  and  to  the  sinister 
argent,  on  a  chief  azure,  two  mullets  of  five  points  or. 

ANGLESEY,  County  of.  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  but  the  seal  of  the  County 
Council  exhibits  the  following  : — Gules,  a  chevron  between  three  lions  rampant 
or.  Motto — "Mon  mam  Cymru."  The  arms  are  quoted  in  Burke's  "  General 
Armory  "  as  those  of  Awfa  ap  Cynddelw,  Founder  of  the  I  Noble  Tribe.  The 
legend  upon  the  seal  is  "  Cynghor  Sirol  Mon,  1889." 

ANGLIA,  East.     Refer  to  East  Anglia. 

ANHALT,  Duchy  of.  Per  pale,  argent  an  eagle  displayed  gules  armed  or, 
dimidiated  with  the  arms  of  Saxony.  Supporters — Two  bears  regardant  sable 
crowned  and  collared  or.     Motto — "  Fuerchte  Gott  und  befolge  seine  befehle." 

[The  arms  are  usually  borne  upon  a  coat  of  numerous  quarterings,  as  shown 
in  the  illustration.] 


ANDOVER 


ANGERS 


ANGLESEY 


ANHALT 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ANNAN  (County  of  Dumfries).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings. 
The  seal  shows  an  escutcheon  charged  with  a  saltire  within  a  bordure.  These 
arms  are  described  in  the  catalogue  of  the  Heraldic  Exhibition  in  Edinburgh  as  . 
the  arms  of  Annandale.  The  arms  of  Annand,  Lord  of  Annandale,  are  quoted 
in  Burke's  "  General  Armory,"  "  Ar.  a  saltire  and  a  chief  gu.,"  but  the  arms 
of  Johnstone,  Marquess  of  Annandale,  a  title  dormant  since  1792,  and  now 
claimed  b}'  Johnstone  of  Westerhall,  are  quoted,  "  ar.  a  saltire  sa.  on  a  chief 
gu.  three  cushions  or."  The  seal  shows  no  tinctures,  so  it  appears  to  be 
doubtful  what  they  actually  are. 

ANSTRUTHER-EASTER  (Fifeshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial 
bearings.  The  seal  represents  an  anchor  with  the  legend  "  Virtute  resparve 
crescvnt  Anstrvther  Easter." 

ANSTRUTHER-WESTER  (Fifeshire).  Has  not  marticulated  any  armorial 
bearings.  The  seal  represents  three  fishes  interlaced  in  a  triangle  with  the 
legend  "  Anstrvther  Vaster." 

ANTIGUA.     Refer  to  Leeward  Islands. 

ANTIGUA,  See  of  Argent,  a  passion  cross  gules,  on  the  dexter  side  a  serpent 
erect  and  wavy  vert,  looking  towards  the  sinister ;  and  on  the  sinister  side  a 
dove  holding  in  the  beak  an  olive  branch  all  proper  ;  on  a  chief  of  the  second 
a  crosier  in  bend  dexter  surmounting  a  key  in  bend  sinister,  the  ward  upwards 
or,  and  in  the  centre  chief  point  an  imperial  crown,  also  proper. 
[Granted  College  of  Arms,  2lst  Sept.  1S42.] 

ANTIQUARIES,  Society  of  (London).  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  and  most  im- 
properly makes  use  of  the  following — "  Argent,  on  a  cross  gules,  the  Royal 
crown  or."     Crest — An  Antique  Roman  lamp  or.     Motto — "  Non  extinguetur." 

[These  arms  were  granted  as  a  quartering  of  augmentation  in  1649  by  King 
Charles  II.  to  his  secretary,  Sir  Edward  Nicholas,  and  one  would  have  imagined 
a  supposedly  antiquarian  society  would  have  kept  its  hands  off  such  an 
honourable  coat.] 

ANTIQUARIES  OF  SCOTLAND,  Society  of     Azure,  the  cross  of  St  Andrew 
argent,  between  an  imperial  crown   in  chief  and  a   thistle  in  base  both  proper, 
all  within  a  double  tressure  flory  counterflory  or. 
"    [Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  r/th  Nov.  1827.] 

ANTRIM,  County  of.     Has  no  arms. 

ANTWERP  (Belgium).  Gules,  a  castle  of  three  towers  domed  in  perspective,  in 
chief  a  dexter  and  a  sinister  hand  couped  at  the  wrist  proper. 


24 


ANNAN 


ANTIGUA,  SEE  OF 


UBLI 


H^  ' 


S^ 


ANTIQUARIES  OF  SCOTLAND 


ANTWERP 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
ANVERS.     Refer  to  Antwerp. 

APOTHECARIES.  The  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  6th 
December  1617.)  Azure,  Apollo  with  his  head  radiant,  holding  in  his  left  hand 
a  bow,  in  his  right  an  arrow  all  or,  supplanting  a  serpent  argent.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  a  rhinoceros  statant  proper.  Supporters — Two  unicorns 
or,  armed,  crined  and  hoofed  argent. 

[The  arms  and  crest  were  confirmed  by  Camden,  Clarenceux,  in  161 7.] 

APPENZELL,  Canton  (Switzerland).  Argent,  a  bear  rampant  sable,  armed  gules. 
Supporter — Behind  the  shield  a  bear  in  full  aspect  gules,  from  his  mouth  smoke 
issuing  proper. 

APPLEBY  (Westmorland).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  corpora- 
tion at  present  in  use,  copied  from  the  obverse  of  the  ancient  seal,  represents  an 
apple-tree  overspreading  the  field  and  surmounted  by  an  escutcheon,  thereon 
three  lions  passant  guardant  in  pale,  with  the  legend  "  Sigiliuni  communitatis 
burgii  de  Appilbi,"  and  a  representation  of  this  is  all  that  is  given  in  Debrett's 
"House  of  Commons."  Burke's  "General  Armory"  quotes  "  Az.  three  lions 
pass,  guard,  in  pale  or,  ducally  crowned  of  the  last."  But  as  they  are 
supplied  to  me  by  the  Town  Clerk  of  the  borough,  and  as  they  are  used,  the 
arms  appear  to  be  gules,  three  lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  or,  crowned  with 
ducal  coronets  of  the  last.  Crest — On  a  ducal  coronet,  a  salamander  in  flames 
of  fire  all  proper.  Supporters — On  either  side,  a  dragon  with  wings  inverted 
gules.     Motto — "  Nee  ferro  nee  igni." 

Dugdale's  visitation  in  1665  simply  gives  drawings  of  the  seals,  and  does 
not  credit  the  town  with  any  arms. 

Berry,  who  simply  gives  as  arms,  "  azure  three  lions  passant  guardant  in 
pale  or,  crowned  with  ducal  coronets  of  the  last,"  gives  the  following  note  : — 
"  These  arms  are  engraved  on  the  corporation  seal,  round  which  is  this  legend, 
'  Sigillum  communitatis  burgii  de  Appilbi.'  On  the  reverse  is  the  figure  of  St 
Laurence  laid  on  a  gridiron,  placed  over  a  fire,  and  at  each  end  thereof  are 
figures  not  to  be  perfectly  defined  ;  above  them,  near  to  the  dexter  side,  is  a 
banner  with  the  arms  of  the  borough,  and  below  them  three  estoiles  ;  and  near 
to  the  sinister  is  an  angel,  holding  a  cope  to  receive  the  soul  of  the  saint.  Round 
the  reverse  is  this  legend,  '  Hie  jacet  Laurentius  in  craticula  positus.'  This 
identical  seal  was  given  to  the  burghers  of  Appleby  by  King  John,  whose 
original  charter  is  still  preserved  in  the  town  chest.  The  parochial  church  is 
dedicated  to  St  Laurence,  and  a  fair  is  annually  kept  within  the  borough  on  St 
Laurence's  Day.  .\  tradition  prevails  in  the  borough  that  the  lions  in  the  arms 
were  crowned  with  ducal  crowns  in  memory  of  some  signal  service  performed  by 
the  burghers  against  the  Scots." 


26 


APOTHECARIES'  COMPANY 


APPENZELL 


THE  BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

ARBROATH,  Royal  Burgh  of  (Forfarshire).  (Anciently  called  Aberbrotheck  or 
Aberbrothock.)  Gules,  a  portcullis  with  chains  pendent  or,  and  in  an  escroU 
over  the  same  this  motto — "Propter  Libertatem."  Supporters — (Dexter)  St 
Thomas  a  Becket  in  his  archiepiscopal  robes  all  proper,  (sinister)  a  Baron  of 
Scotland  armed  cap-a-pie  holding  in  his  exterior  hand  the  letter  from  the  Con- 
vention of  the  Scottish  Estates,  held  at  Arbroath  in  the  year  1320,  addressed  to 
Pope  John  XXII.,  all  proper. 

[Arms  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  and  supporters  granted  12th  January 
1900.  Patent  printed  iti  extcnso  in  the  Genealogical  Magazine,  July  1900,  Vol. 
iv.,  p.  107.] 

ARCH-TREASURER  OF  THE  HOLY  ROMAN  EMPIRE.  The  Kings  of 
England  from  George  I.  to  William  IV.  bore  upon  an  inescutcheon  over  the  arms 
of  Hanover,  "Gules,  a  representation  of  the  Crown  of  Charlemagne,"  as 
indicative  of  their  Office. 

ARCHERS,  The   Royal  Company  of,  The  King's  Body-Guard   for  Scotland. 

Vert,  three  arrows  proper,  barbed  and  feathered  argent,  one  in  pale  and  two  in 
saltire,  surmounted  of  an  escutcheon  or,  charged  with  a  lion  rampant  within  a 
double  tressure  flory,  counterflory  of  fleurs-de-lys  gules,  and  ensigned  with  an 
Imperial  crown  proper.  Supporters — Two  archers  with  bows  in  their  exterior 
hands,  that  on  the  dexter  in  the  uniform  of  the  Company  in  the  year  1716,  that 
on  the  sinister  in  that  of  the  year  18 16,  and  in  an  escrol  over  the  shield  this 
motto,  "Arcii  atque  animo." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register.] 


28 


ARBROATH 


ROYAL  ARCHERS,  KING'S  BODY-GUARD  FOR  SCOTLAND 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ARDAGH,  See  of.  Or,  a  cross  gules,  in  each  quarter  a  trefoil  slipped  vert,  on  a 
chief  sable  a  key  erect  of  the  first. 

[These  arms  are  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office,  but  by  the  disestablishment  of 
the  Irish  Church  are  now  extinct.] 

ARDAGH.     Refer  to  Kilmore,  Elphin  and  Ardagh,  Bishop  of. 

ARDFERT     Refer  to  Limerick,  Ardfert,  and  Aghado,  Bishop  of. 

ARDROSSAN  (Ayrshire).      Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 

ARENSBERG.     Refer  to  Cologne,  Elector  of 

ARGENTINE  REPUBLIC.  ^^^  Per  fesse  azure  and  argent,  from  the  dexter  and 
sinister  sides,  an  arm  issuant  fesseways,  the  hands  clasped  and  grasping  a  staff 
in  pale  proper,  thereon  the  cap  of  Liberty  gules. 

ARGYLL,  County  of     Has  no  arms. 

ARGYLL,  Dukes  of.  Behind  the  escutcheon  are  borne  in  saltire,  viz.,  in  bend 
dexter  a  baton  gules  powdered  with  thistles  or,  ensigned  with  an  Imperial 
crown  proper,  thereon  the  crest  of  Scotland  (for  the  office  of  Hereditary  Great 
Master  of  the  Household  in  Scotland),  in  bend  sinister  a  sword  proper,  hilt 
and  pommel  or  (for  the  office  of  Justice-General  of  Argyllshire). 

ARGYLL,  See  of.     Azure,  two  croziers  in  saltire,  and  in  chief  a  mitre  or. 

[These  arms  were  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  c.  1672-7,  and  again  c. 
1680-7,  and  are  still  in  use,  but  by  the  disestablishment  of  the  Episcopal  Church 
in  Scotland  they  are  really  extinct,  and  their  present  use  is  improper.] 

ARGYLL   AND  THE   ISLES,   Bishop  of.      According  to   Crockford  the  arms 
in  use  are  Quarterly  :   i  and  4,  the  arms  of  the  See  of  Argyll  (to  which  refer)  ; 
2  and  3,  the  arms  of  the  See  of  the  Isles  (to  which  refer). 
[There  is  no  authority  for  such  usage.] 

ARMAGH,  County  of     Has  no  arms. 

ARMAGH,  City  of  Has  no  arms.  Debrett's  "  House  of  Commons"  gives  an 
illustration  of  a  seal  showing  a  harp  or  on  a  field  azure,  with  the  legend,  "The 
Seal  of  the  bvrgh  of  Armagh."  On  a  sheet  of  Irish  armorial  bearings  published 
by  Marcus  Ward  &  Co.,  arms  are  given,  namely,  "Azure,  a  harp  or." 


3° 


t 

1 

n(C"^^y^< 

m~~ 

ARGENTINE  REPUBLIC 


ARDAGH, SEE  OF 


ARMAGH,  CITY  OF 


ARGYLL  AND  THE  ISLES,  BISHOP  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ARMAGH,  Archbishopric  of.  Azure,  an  episcopal  staff  ensigned  with  a  cross 
patee  or,  surmounted  by  a  pall  argent,  edged  and  fringed  gold,  charged  with 
four  crosses  formee-fitchee  sable. 

[This  coat,  which  is  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office,  remains  in  use,  but  through 
the  disestablishment  of  the  Irish  Church  it  is  really  extinct,  and  its  use  is 
illegal.] 

ARMAGH   ROYAL  SCHOOL  uses  the  Royal  Arms  of  George  1. 

ARMED  ASSOCIATION  OF  OTLEY.     Refer  to  Otley  Association. 

ARMOUR-BEARER    TO    THE    KING    IN    SCOTLAND,    The    Heritable. 

Behind  the  siiield  two  spears  in  saltire  bearing  on  their  points  a 
Royal  Helmet  and  a  shield  charged  with  the  Royal  Arms  of  Scotland  all 
proper,  "  as  the  badge  of  the  office  of  Heritable  Armour-Bearer  to  the  King." 

[The  arms  of  Smith,  alias  Seton,  of  Touch  were  so  matriculated  in  Lyon 
Office,  1 77 1.  But  the  office  has  passed  to  the  family  of  Steuart  of  Allanton, 
and  at  their  matriculation  of  arms,  in  1815,  a  spear  and  helmet  were  added 
as  charges  upon  their  shield. 

ARMOURERS,  Worshipful  Company  of  ( London).  (Incorporated  8th  May  1453. 
United  with  the  Braziers'  Company,  17th  June  1708.)  Argent,  on  a  chevron 
sable,  a  gauntlet  of  the  first,  between  two  pairs  of  swords  in  saltire  of  the  last, 
hilts  and  pomels  or,  on  a  chief  of  the  second,  an  oval  shield  of  the  field  charged 
with  a  cross  gules  between  two  helmets  proper,  garnished  or.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  a  demi-man  of  arms  armed  argent,  open-faced,  purfled  or, 
holding  in  the  hand  a  mace  of  war.     Mantled  gules,  doubled  argent. 

[Granted  by  Hawley,  Clarenceux,  15th  October  1556.  See  Catalogue  of 
Heraldic  Exhibition.] 

ARMOURERS  AND  BRASIERS,  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (The 
two  Companies  were  united  by  Charter,  17th  June  1708.)  The  Arms  are  those 
of  the  two  Companies  impaled,  usually  displayed  on  separate  escutcheons,  the 
dexter  the  Armourers'  (to  which  refer),  the  sinister  the  Braziers',  viz.,  azure,  on  a 
chevron  or  between  two  ewers  {i.e.  beakers)  in  chief  and  a  fleshpot  in  base  or, 
three  roses  gules,  barbed  vert,  seeded  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a 
demi-man  in  armour,  couped  at  the  middle  of  the  thighs  all  proper,  garnished 
or,  the  beaver  up,  on  his  head  a  plume  of  three  feathers,  two  argent  and  one 
gules,  round  his  waist  a  sash  of  the  last,  fringed  of  the  second,  holding  in  his 
dexter  hand  a  mace  of  war.  Supporters — Two  men  in  complete  armour  all 
proper,  the  dexter  of  the  first  garnished  or,  the  sinister  all  of  the  last,  on  their 
heads  plumes  of  feathers,  round  their  waists  a  sash,  and  each  holding  in  his 
exterior  hand  a  sword  proper.      Motto — "  We  are  one." 

[Arms  of  the  United  Company  granted  28th  February  1709.] 
(The  ewers  in  chief  in  the  Braziers'  arms  have  each  one  handle,  which  is 
turned  to  the  sides  of  the  escutcheon.) 

32 


ARMAGH,  ARCHBISHOPRIC  OF 


^«Hi5II125h 


ARMOURERS  AND  BRASIERS  COMPANY 


THE   BOCK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ARMS.  See  College  of  Arms,  Lyon  Court,  Ulster's  Office,  Kings  of  Arms,  Heralds 
of  Arms,  Pursuivants  of  Arms  ;  and  see  Gentlemen-at-Arms. 

ARMSTRONG  COLLEGE  (Newcastle-upon-Tyne).  Argent,  a  cross  pat6e, 
quadrat  in  the  centre  gules,  on  a  chief  of  the  last  three  towers  of  the  first,  all 
within  a  bordure  compony  of  the  second  and  or,  upon  a  canton  the  arms  of 
Baron  Armstrong.  Crest — A  tower,  thereon  a  beacon  fired  all  proper.  Motto — 
"  Mens  agitat  molem." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  March  24,  1906.  The  arms  of  Lord  Armstrong 
were  "gules,  a  tilting  spear  fessewise  or,  headed  argent  between  two  dexter 
arms  embowed  in  armour,  couped  at  the  shoulders  fessewise  proper,  hands 
extended  of  the  last."] 

ARNHEIM  (Holland).    Azure,  an  eagle  displayed  with  two  heads  argent,  armed  or. 

ARRAGON.     Or,  four  pallet  gules. 

ARTILLERY  COMPANY,  The  Honourable  (London).  Argent,  a  cross  gules 
(being  that  of  St  George)  charged  with  a  lion  passant  guardant  or  (being  part 
of  the  Royal  Arms  of  England),  on  a  chief  azure,  a  portcullis  of  the  third 
between  two  ostrich  feathers  erect  of  the  field.  Crest— Qx\  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  a  dexter  arm  embowed  in  armour,  the  gauntlet  grasping  a  pike  in  bend 
sinister  or  between  two  dragon's  wings  argent,  each  charged  with  a  cross  gules. 
Supporters — On  the  dexter  side  a  pikeman  armed  and  accoutred,  supporting 
with  the  exterior  hand  a  pike  erect  proper,  and  on  the  sinister  side  a  musketeer, 
with  his  matchlock,  bandolier,  and  rest  all  proper.  Motto — "  Arma  pacis  fulcra." 
[Recorded  in  the  Heralds'  College.  Exemplified  1821.  Whilst  the  fore- 
going is  the  official  blazon  of  the  supporters,  the  following  description  is 
perhaps  a  better  guide  to  the  artist.  Siipporters — Dexter,  a  man  proper,  his 
head  and  body  in  armour,  his  arms  habited  in  buff,  breeches  gules,  stockings 
argent,  shoes  proper,  holding  in  his  exterior  hand  a  pike.  Sinister,  a  man  proper 
habited  as  the  dexter,  except  the  armour  on  the  body,  this  having  a  coat  of  buff 
proper  over  his  left  shoulder,  and  under  his  right  arm  a  belt  strung  with  cartouches 
gules,  in  his  sinister  hand  a  musket  erect,  a  resting  staff  and  match-rope,  and  at 
his  side  a  scimitar,  all  proper.  The  Supporters  are  habited  as  in  the  time  of 
King  Charles  I.,  the  dexter  as  a  regular  soldier,  the  sinister  as  a  militia-man  of 
the  city.] 

ARTILLERY  YARD.     Gules,  two  lances  in  saltire  or,  on  a  chief  vert,  a  cannon 
fessewise  or. 

[Of  no  authority.] 


34 


ARMSTRONG  COLLEGE 


ARNHEIM 


HON    ARTILLERY  COMPANY 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ARUNDEL  (Sussex).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  a  swallow 
volant.  (Evidently  a  pun  upon  the  word  "hirondelle,  Anglice,  swallow.") 
Legend,  "  Sigillum  burginsim  de  Arundel."  Burke's  "  General  Armory  "  gives 
this  as  a  coat-of-arms,  namely  "  Ar.  a  swallow  volant  in  bend  sinister  sable." 

ASAPH,  ST.     See  St  Asaph. 

ASCENSION.     No  warrant  assigning  arms  has  as  yet  been  issued  to  Ascension. 

ASHBURTON  (Devonshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents 
upon  a  mount  a  chapel  with  a  spire  between  a  branch  of  teazle  on  the  dexter 
side,  and  a  saltire  couped  on  the  sinister  side,  in  the  dexter  chief  a  sun  in 
splendour,  and  in  the  sinister  chief  a  crescent :  with  the  legend  "  Sigillvm 
Bvrgi  de  Aysheberton."  This  has  been  quoted  to  the  editor  as  a  coat-of- 
arms,  the  following  colours  being  assigned  : — The  field  azure,  the  mount  vert, 
the  chapel,  sun,  crescent,  and  saltire  argent,  the  teazle  proper,  with  the  motto, 
"  Fides  probata  coronat."  The  saltire  is  allusive  of  St  Andrew,  the  patron 
saint  of  the  Parish  Church.  The  sun  and  moon  are  supposed  to  be  old 
Phoenician  symbols,  and  are  therefore  used  to  indicate  the  Stannary  rights ; 
the  teazle  calls  attention  to  the  woollen  industry,  and  the  chapel  represents 
that  of  St  Lawrence,  which  was  the  Guild  Chantry,  built  by  Bishop  Stapeldon, 
1 3 14,  and  given  to  the  Portreeve  and  Burgesses. 

ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE  (Lancashire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those 
used  are  taken  from  the  family  of  Ashton  or  Assheton,  and  are  argent,  a  mullet 
pierced  sable,  in  the  dexter  chief  a  crescent  gules.  Crest — On  a  mural  coronet 
proper,  a  griffin's  head  erased  gules,  gorged  with  a  ducal  coronet  or.  Motto — 
"  Labor  omnia  vincit." 

ASSURANCE  COMPANIES.  Refer  to  Edinburgh  Life  Assurance  Company' 
Metropolitan  Life  Assurance  Society,  Pearl  Life  Assurance  Company,  Prudential 
Assurance  Company,  and  Royal  Exchange  Assurance  Company. 

ASTON  MANOR,  Borough  of  (Warwickshire).  Quarterly  azure  and  or,  a  cross 
moline  between  three  crosses  patee  fitchee  in  the  first  and  fourth  quarters,  and 
two  lions  passant  in  the  second  and  third,  all  counterchanged.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  within  an  annulet  or,  a  squirrel  sejant  cracking  a  nut 
proper.     Motto — "  E.xaltavit  humiles." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  March  22,  1904.] 

ASTRACHAN  (Russia).  Azure,  a  seax  in  base  fesseways  point  to  the  dexter,  in 
chief  the  Russian  Imperial  crown  all  proper. 


36 


ARUNDEL 


ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE 


ASTRACHAN 


ASTON  MANOR 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ATHABASCA,  See  of  (Canada).  Or,  a  tuft  of  rushes  between  three  sykes  proper, 
on  a  chief  wavy  azure,  a  dove  volant  argent,  holding  in  its  beak  an  olive- 
sprig  vert. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

ATHENRY  (Co.  Galway).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Lewis's  "Topographical 
Dictionary  "  represents,  upon  an  escutcheon  an  embattled  gateway,  and  from 
the  battlements  rising  three  towers  domed.  This  design  is  presumably  taken 
from  the  seal. 

ATHENS  (Greece).  Argent,  the  head  of  Athene  in  a  helmet  and  couped  at 
the  neck. 

ATHERTON  (Lancashire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  attributed  to  it 
are  the  arms  of  the  family  of  Powys,  namely,  or,  a  lion's  gamb  erased  in  bend 
dexter  between  two  cross  crosslets  fitchee  gules ;  and  upon  an  escutcheon  of 
pretence  the  arms  of  the  family  of  Atherton  of  Atherton,  namely,  gules,  three 
sparrow-hawks  argent,  beaked,  belled,  and  jessed  or.  Crests — i,  A  lion's  gamb 
erased  and  erect  gules,  holding  a  sceptre  in  bend  sinister,  headed  with  a  fleur- 
de-lis  or  (for  Powys).  2,  A  swan  azure,  ducally  gorged  and  lined,  or.  The 
Right  Hon.  Thomas  Powys,  2nd  Baron  Lilford,  married,  December  5,  1797, 
Henrietta  Maria,  eldest  daughter  and  coheir  of  Robert  Atherton,  Esquire,  of 
Atherton  Hall,  i^i  the  county  of  Cumberland. 

ATHLONE  (Cos.  Westmeath  and  Roscommon).  Has  no  armorial  bearings 
recorded  in  Ulster's  Office,  but  the  following  are  used  : — Gules,  a  lion  passant 
guardant  or,  on  a  chief  of  the  last  two  roses  of  the  field  slipped  and  leaved  vert. 
Motto,  "  Urbes  stant  legibus."  These  duly  appear  upon  the  seal  of  the  town,  but 
without  the  tinctures,  which  are  conjectural.  The  legend  upon  the  seal  is 
"Sigillum  oppidi  Aloniensis,  1663." 

ATHY  (Co.  Kildare).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Lewis's  "  Topographical 
Dictionary  "  gives  upon  an  escutcheon  a  bridge  of  three  arches  over  water,  from 
the  centre  of  the  bridge  rising  a  tower  between  two  escutcheons,  each  sur- 
mounted by  a  coronet,  that  on  the  dexter  side  charged  with  a  saltire,  that  on 
the  sinister  charged  with  a  fesse  and  thereon  three  .  .  . 


38 


ATHENS 


ATHABASCA,  SEE  OF 


ATHLONE 


ATHERTON 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ATTORNEYS,  SOLICITORS,  PROCTORS,  &c.,  Society  of  (The  Incorporated 
Law  Society,  London).  Ermine,  on  a  cross  gules,  a  sword  sheathed  in  pale  point 
upwards  or,  a  chief  of  the  last,  thereon  a  pale  of  the  second,  charged  with  a  lion 
passant  guardant  of  the  third,  between  a  lion  rampant  also  of  the  second  upon 
the  dexter  side,  and  upon  the  sinister  a  harp  azure.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  the  figure  of  Justice  represented  by  a  female  figure  blindfolded,  habited 
azure,  mantled  gules,  in  the  right  hand  a  balance  suspended  or,  and  in  the  left  a 
sword  erect  proper.  Suppoiiers — On  the  dexter  side  a  pegasus  or,  around  the 
neck  a  double  chain  gold,  and  pendant  therefrom  an  escocheon  ermine,  charged 
with  a  rose  gules,  and  on  the  sinister  side  a  lion  purpure,  around  the  neck  a 
double  chain,  and  pendant  therefrom  an  escocheon  or,  charged  with  a  trefoil 
slipped  vert.     Motto — "  Leges  juraque  servamus." 

[Recorded  College  of  Arms,  Gts.  xlvii.  398,  400] 

AUBIGNY.      Azure,  three  fleurs-de-lys  within  a  bordure  engrailed  or. 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  c.   1672-7,  as  the  arms  for  Aubigny  in  the 
first  and  fourth  quarters,  by  the  Duke  of  Lennox  and  Richmond.] 

AUCHTERARDER.  Or,  two  chevrons  gules.  Motto — "  Non  potest  civitas 
abscondi  supra  montem  posita." 

[Of  no  authority,  being  really  the  arms  of  the  old  Earls  of  Strathearn.] 

AUCHTERMUCHTY  (Fifeshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings. 
The  seal  represents  a  man  scattering  seed  and  has  the  motto,  "  Dum  sero  spero," 
with  the  legend  "  Sig.  Auchtermuchty." 

AUCKLAND,  City  of  (New  Zealand).  Argent,  upon  waves  of  the  sea  a  two- 
masted  ship  in  full  sail  proper,  flagged  gules,  on  a  chief  per  pale  azure  and 
gules,  to  the  dexter  a  cornucopia  or,  to  the  sinister  a  shovel  surmounted  by  a 
pick  in  saltire  proper.  Crest — Issuant  out  of  a  mural  crown  or,  a  representation 
of  the  "  Phormium  tenax  "  flowered  proper.  Motto — "  Advance."  Supporters — 
On  either  side  an  apteryx  (or  kiwi)  proper. 

[Granted,  College    of   Arms,  October   23,   191 1,  and    Supporters,   October 
24,  191 1]. 


40 


AUCHTERARDER 


INCORPORATED  LAW  SOCIETY 


AUCKLAND 


THE  BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

AUCKLAND,  See  of  (New  Zealand).     Azure,  three  estoiles  one  and  two  argent. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

AUGSBURG,  Town    of  (Bavaria).      Party  per    pale   gules   and    argent,  on    the 
capital  of  a  pillar  or,  a  pine-cone  vert. 

AUGSBURG,  Bishopric  of.     Party  per  pale  gules  and  argent. 

AUSCHWITZ,  Duchy  of.     Argent,  an  eagle  displayed  azure. 


42 


AUCKLAND,  SEE  OF 


AUGSBURG 


AUSCHWITZ 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

AUSTRALIA,  Commonwealth  of.  Quarterly  of  six,  the  first  quarter  argent,  a 
cross  gules  charged  with  a  lion  passant  guardant  between  on  each  limb  a  mullet 
of  six  points  or ;  the  second,  azufe,  five  mullets,  one  of  eight,  two  of  seven,  one 
of  six,  and  one  of  five  points  of  the  first  (representing  the  constellation  of  the 
Southern  Cross)  ensigned  with  an  Imperial  Crown  proper;  the  third  of  the 
first,  a  Maltese  cross  of  the  fourth,  surmounted  by  a  like  Imperial  Crown  ;  the 
fourth  of  the  third,  on  a  perch  wreathed  vert  and  gules,  an  Australian  piping 
shrike  displayed  also  proper ;  the  fifth  also  or,  a  swan  naiant  to  the  sinister 
sable  ;  the  last  of  the  first,  a  lion  passant  of  the  second  ;  the  whole  within  a 
bordure  ermine.  For  the  Crest — On  a  wreath  or  and  azure,  a  seven-pointed  star 
or:  and  for  Supporters — Dexter  a  kangaroo,  sinister  an  emu,  both  proper. 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  19th  Sept.  191 2.] 

The  bordure  makes  this  one  indivisible  coat,  and  the  separate  quaiterings 
are  not  herein  assigned  to  the  several  states.  The  first  quarter  is  the  device 
formerly  in  use  in  New  South  Wales  and  now  superseded  ;  the  second  quarter  is 
the  device  incorporated  in  the  Royal  Warrant  for  Victoria,  g.v. ;  the  third 
quarter  is  the  device  formerly  in  use  in  Queensland  and  incorporated  in  the 
crest  assigned  to  that  state ;  the  fourth  quarter  is  a  device  recently  adopted  by 
South  Australia  ;  the  fifth  quarter  is  the  device  in  use  in  West  Australia  ;  and 
the  sixth  that  in  use  in  Tasmania. 

This  Royal  Warrant  supersedes  an  earlier  one,  namely,  argent,  on  a  cross 
gules,  cottised  azure,  five  mullets  of  six  points  of  the  field,  a  bordure  of  the 
third  charged  with  six  escutcheons  also  argent,  each  charged  with  a  chevron  of 
the  second.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours  (argent  and  azure)  a  star  of 
seven  points  or.  Supporters — On  a  mount  vert,  on  the  dexter  side  a  kangaroo 
and  on  the  sinister  an  emu  both  proper.     Motto — "  Advance  Australia." 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  7th  May  1908.] 

The  banner  carried  for  Australia  at  the  Coronation  of  King  George  V- 
showed  the  arms  assigned  in  1908.  Some  years  previously,  as  the  result  of 
a  public  competition,  an  "  Australian  flag"  had  been  adopted  and  was  most 
improperly  recognised  by  the  Colonial  Office.  The  flag  is  blue,  and  at  the  hoist 
a  canton  of  the  Union,  and  below  this  a  large  star,  and  in  the  fly  a  representation 
of  the  five  stars  of  the  Southern  Cross.  The  Governor-General  of  Australia  flies 
the  Union  flag,  and  in  the  centre  a  seven  pointed  yellow  star,  surmounted  by  the 
crown,  and  within  a  wreath  of  foliage. 

A  floral  badge — the  Wattle — is  sometimes  claimed  and  used  as  emblematical 
of  Australia. 

The  Commonwealth  of  Australia  consists  of  the  States  of  New  South 
Wales,  Victoria,  South  Australia,  Queensland,  Tasmania  and  Western  Australia, 
to  which  refer.     See  also  City  of  Sydney. 


44 


AUSTRALIA,  COMMONWEALTH  OF 


THE  DISCARDED  ARMS  OF  AUSTRALIA 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
AUSTRALIA,  Corporation  of  Accountants  of.     Refer  to  Accountants. 

AUSTRALIA,  See  of.  Azure,  four  stars  of  eight  points  in  cross  argent,  intended 
to  represent  the  Crux  Australis  or  principal  constellation  of  the  Southern 
Hemisphere. 

[Recorded  College  of  Arms,  Gts.  41,  229.] 

AUSTRALIA,  North-West,  See  of.  Per  fesse  azure  and  argent,  a  cross  of 
the  last  between  in  the  first  quarter  the  Southern  Constellation,  in  the  second 
(?  a  nugget),  in  the  third  a  (?)  and  a  (?)  in  saltire,  and  in  the  fourth  a  swan 
naiant  sable. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

AUSTRIA,  Empire  of.  The  arms  are  displayed  upon  a  double-headed  eagle  sable 
with  golden  beak  and  claws,  which  holds  in  its  dexter  claw  a  golden  sceptre  and 
a  drawn  sword  and  in  its  sinister  the  Imperial  Orb.  Each  of  its  heads  is 
imperially  crowned.  On  its  breast  is  the  escutcheon  tierced  in  pale — (i)  Haps- 
burg,  (2)  Austria,  (3)  Lorraine,  viz.,  Hapsbitrg  or,  a  lion  rampant  gules, 
crowned  azure  ;  (2)  Austria  gules,  a  fesse  argent ;  (3)  Lorraine  or,  on  a  bend  gules 
three  alerions  argent.  Around  this  escutcheon  are  the  Collar  of  the  Order  of 
the  Golden  Fleece  and  the  Grand  cordon  of  the  Order  of  Maria  Theresa.  On 
the  wings  and  tail  of  the  Imperial  Eagle  are  eleven  crowned  escutcheons, 
viz.,  (1)  Hungary  ancient  and  modern  impaled  (viz.,  ancient — Barry  of  eight 
argent  and  gules ;  modern — gules  on  a  mount  in  base  vert,  an  open  crown  or, 
issuant  therefrom  a  patriarchal  cross  argent) ;  (2)  Esdavonia  (gules,  issuing 
from  the  sinister  flank  an  arm  embowed  proper,  vested  gules,  and  holding  a  sabre 
argent);  (3)  Upper  Austria  (per  pale  or,  an  eagle  displayed  sable,  impaling  gules 
two  pallets  argent)  impaling  Austria  beloiv  the  Ems  (azure,  five  larks  or  eaglets 
displayed  or — these  being  really  the  ancient  arms  of  Austria-Babenburger  line)  ; 

(4)  Salzburg  (per  pale  or,  a  lion  rampant  sable,  impaling  gules,  a  fesse  argent) ; 

(5)  Styria  (vert,  a  griffin  rampant  queue  fourch^e,  argent,  vomiting  flames  of 
fire  proper,  and  crowned  or) ;  (6)  Tyrol  argent,  an  eagle  displayed  gules 
crowned  or;  (7)  (at  top  of  sinister  wing)  Bohemia  (gules,  a  lion  rampant 
double  queued   argent,  crowned  or) ;    (8)  lllyria  azure,   an    antique  galley  or ; 

(9)  Transylvania  (per  fesse  azure  and  or,  over  all  a  bar  gules,  issuing  therefrom 
a  demi-eagle  displayed  sable  in  chief  and  in   base  seven  towers  of  the  third  ; 

(10)  Moravia  (azure,  an  eagle  displayed  chequy  gules  and  argent,  crowned 
or)  impaling  Silesia  (or,  an  eagle  displayed  sable,  crowned  of  the  field,  on  its 
breast  a  crescent  and  crosslet  argent);  (11)  Carinthia  (or,  three  lions  passant 
sable)  impaling  Carniola  (argent,  an  eagle  displayed  azure,  on  its  breast  a 
crescent  counter  compony  of  the  field  and  gules). 

The  Imperial  Crown  is  placed  above  the  crowned  heads  of  the  double  eagle. 
When   Supporters  are  used  they  are  two  griffins  or,  the  plumage  and  the 
breast  and  wings  sable. 

Although  the  foregoing  is  the  full  description,  the  arms  of  Austria  are  more 

46 


AUSTRALIA,  SEE  OF 


AUSTRALIA,  NORTH-WEST,  SEE  OF 


AUSTRIA 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

usually  represented  by  an  escutcheon  on  the  breast  of  the  eagle  showing  the 
arms  of  Austria  and  Hungary,  or  Austria,  Hungary,  and  Lorraine,  as  in  the 
illustration. 

The  Ecu  Complet  of  the  Austrian  Empire  as  established  by  Imperial 
Decree  in  1836  was  as  follows  : — 

Quarterly  of  nine  grand  quarters  :  I.  (i)  Dalmatia,  (2)  Croatia,  (3)  Esclavonia, 
(4)  Transylvania,  and  over  all  the  impaled  coats  of  Hungary,  ancient  and 
modern.  II.  (i)  Upper  Austria,  (2)  Salzburg,  (3)  Styria,  (4)  The  Teutonic 
Order,  (5)  Tyrol,  (6)  Trient,  (7)  Brixen,  (8)  Hohen-Embs,  (9)  Montfort  and 
Feldkirch,  (10)  Bregenz,  (il)  Sonnenburg,  and  over  all  Austria — ancient. 
III.  (i)  iVIoravia,  (2)  Silesia,  (3)  Upper  Lusatia,  (4)  Teschen,  (5)  Lower  Lusatia, 
and  over  all  an  escocheon  of  Bohemia.  IV.  (i)  Cumania,  (2)  Bosnia,  (3)  Bulgaria, 
(4)  Servia,(5)  Raschia,  (6)  tierced  in  pale — (i)  Hapsburg,  (2)  Austria,  (3)  Lorraine. 
VI.  (i)  Jerusalem,  2  Castile,  (3)  Leon,  (4)  Arragon,  (5)  The  Indies,  (6)  Sicily, 

(7)  Calabria,  (8)  Naples.  VII.  (i)  Tuscany,  (2)  Modena,  (3)  Parma,  (4)  Guastalla, 
and  over  all  an  escutcheon  per  pale — (a)  Milan,  (d)  Venice.     VIII.  (i)  Carinthia, 

(2)  Carniola,  (3)  VVindische-Mark,  (4)  Frioul,  (5)  Trieste,  (6)  Istria,  (7)  Gradisca, 

(8)  Gorz,  (9)  Ragusa,  (10)  Cattaro,  (11)  Zara.     IX.  (i)  Lodomiria,  (2)  Cracow, 

(3)  Auschwitz,  (4)  Zator,  and  over  all  an  escutcheon  of  Galicia. 

AUSTRIAN  LEO  SOCIETY  (A  Catholic  Literary  Society).  Sable,  a  lion 
rampant  or,  armed  gules,  charged  on  the  shoulder  with  an  escutcheon  of  the 
arms  of  the  Austrian  Imperial  Family  (gules,  a  fess  argent),  and  holding  in  its 
forepaws  the  triple  papal  cross  argent  (1892). 

AXBRIDGE  (Somersetshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seals  each 
represent  a  Paschal  Lamb,  one  within  the  legend  "  Sigillum  communitatis  burgi 
Axbridg." 

AYERST  HALL,  Cambridge.    (Closed.)    Argent,  on  a  bend  engrailed  azure,  a  sun 
in  splendour  and  an  eagle  displayed  ;  in  the  sinister  chief  a  cross  moline. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

AYLESBURY  (Buckinghamshire).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

AYR,  The  County  Council  for  the  County  of.  Or,  a  saltire  gules,  on  a  chief  of  the 
second  a  holy  lamb,  cross,  staff,  and  banner  of  St  Andrew  proper  between  two 
lyres  of  the  first,  stringed  argent. 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Office,  8th  day  of  July  1890.] 


48 


AYR,  COUNTY  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

AYR,  The  Town  of.  The  entry  in  Lyon  Register  is  as  follows : — "  The  Royall 
Burgh  of  Aire  bears  Gules  a  castle  triple-towered  argent  betwixt  a  holy  lamb, 
cross,  staff,  and  banner  of  St  Andrew  on  the  dexter,  and  on  the  sinister  the 
head  of  John  the  Baptist  in  a  charger  proper,  in  the  base  the  sea  azur."  5th 
September  1673. 

The  arms  as  usually  used  are  the  same  as  shown  in  the  illustration,  and  this 
form  appears  upon  the  seal  at  present  in  use,  but  upon  another  seal  the  lamb  is 
placed  in  the  centre  chief  point  above  the  middle  tower,  and  a  St  John  the 
Baptist's  head  in  a  charger  is  placed  on  both  sides  of  the  castle.  The  blazon  by 
a  distorted  reading  could  be  made   to   describe   such  a  representation  of  the 


AYR  ACADEMY  (Ayr).  Gules,  rising  from  a  sea  undy  argent  and  azure,  a  castle 
triple  towered  of  the  second,  between  the  head  of  St  John  the  Baptist  on  a 
charger  on  the  dexter  and  an  open  book  bearing  this  inscription,  "  Dominus 
illuminatio  mea,"  on  the  sinister,  all  proper,  on  a  chief  of  the  second  a  holy  lamb 
with  cross,  staff,  and  banner  of  Scotland  all  proper. 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  i8th  February  1912,  the  fees  being  raised 
by  subscription  amongst  former  scholars.] 

BACUP  (Lancashire).  Azure,  on  a  fesse  between  two  bales  of  cotton  in  chief  or, 
and  a  block  of  stone  with  Lewis  attached  in  base  proper,  a  fleece  sable 
between  two  bees  volant  of  the  third,  in  the  centre  chief  point  a  squirrel  sejant 
of  the  second.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  in  front  of  a  bale  of  cotton 
or,  a  stag  gorged  with  a  collar  vair,  and  resting  the  dexter  forefoot  on  a  trefoil 
slipped  gold.     Motto — "  Honor  et  industria." 

[Granted  13th  March  1883  by  Sir  Albert  William  Woods,  Garter  Principal 
King  of  Arms ;  Walter  Aston  Blount,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms ;  and  George 
E.  Cokayne,  Norroy  King  of  Arms.] 

[The  above  is  the  official  blazon,  which  omits  the  tincture  of  the  stag. 
Burke  gives  it  "  proper  "  in  the  "  Armory,"  which  the  Editor  fancies  is  correct.] 


SO 


AYR,  TOWN  OF 


AYR  ACADEMY 


UFLlf/ j 


BACUP 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BADEN,  Grand  Duchy  of.  Or,  a  bend  gules.  Supporters — Two  griffins  regardant 
argent,  crowned  or. 

BAHAMAS,  The.  No  warrant  has  been  issued  assigning  arms  either  to  The 
Bahamas  as  a  whole  or  to  any  of  the  constituent  islands. 

The  device  published  by  the  Admiralty  is  a  ship  on  the  sea  in  full  sail 
within  a  garter  bearing  the  motto,  "  Commercia  expulsis  piratis  restituta." 

BAKERS,  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  22nd  July  1509.) 
(This  is  really  the  Company  of  White  Bakers.)  Gules,  an  arm  embowed  vested 
gules,  cuffed  or,  holding  a  balance  between  three  garbs  also  or,  on  a  chief  barry 
wavy  of  four  argent  and  azure,  a  cloud  proper  between  two  anchors  or,  the  arm 
descending  from  the  cloud.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  two  arms 
embowed  proper,  holding  in  their  hands  a  chaplet  of  wheat  or.  Supporters — Two 
stags  proper,  attired  or,  each  gorged  with  a  chaplet  of  wheat  of  the  last.  Motto — 
"Praise  God  for  All." 

[Granted  by  Cooke,  Clarenceux,  F.  13,  40.] 

BAKERS,  The  Craft  and  Incorporation  of  (Aberdeen).     Or,  two  bakers'  pyles 
disposed    in    saltyre    gules    each    charged    with    three    loaves    in    pale    argent, 
between  a  tower  triple-towered  in  chief  and  a  mill-rind  in  base  [of  the  second]. 
[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  1682.] 

BAKERS  COMPANY  (Exeter).     Gules,  a  balance  between  three  garbs  or,  on  a 
chief  barry  wavy  of  four  argent  and  azure,  a  hand  proper,  vested  gules,  cuffed 
or,  issuing    from   clouds   affixed   to   the   upper   part   of  the  chief   holding    the 
balance.     Motto — "  Praise  God  for  all." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

BAKERS.     Refer  also  to  Brown  Bakers  and  to  Baxters. 

BAKERS'  GUILD  (Li^ge).  Azure,  between  two  rolls,  a  saw-blade  in  pale  point 
downwards  or. 


52 


BADEN 


BAKERS,  CRAFT  AND  INCORPORATION 

OF (ABERDEEN) 


BAKERS,  WORSHIPFUL  COMPANY  OF  (LONDON) 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BALIOL  COLLEGE  (Oxford).  [Founded  1263  by  Sir  John  Baliol  of  Barnard 
Castle  (father  of  John  Baliol,  King  of  Scotland)  and  completed  and  endowed 
by  his  widow  Devorgulla  in  1284.]  Gules,  an  inescutcheon  voided  argent 
impaling  azure,  a  lion  rampant  argent  ducally  crowned  or. 

[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms  at  the  Visitation  of  the  County  of  Oxford, 

IS  74-] 

According  to  the  Oxford  University  Calendar  the  arms  in  use  are  azure, 
a  lion  rampant  argent,  crowned  or,  impaling  the  arms  of  Baliol  as  above 
delineated. 

BALLARAT,  See  of  (Australia).  Ermine,  a  mill-rind  sable,  on  a  chief  azure,  a 
celestial  crown  or. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

BALLATER.  Has  no  arms.  Those  in  use  are  Quarterly,  i  and  4  or,  a  lion 
rampant  gules;  2  and  3  argent,  a  fir-tree  growing  out  of  a  mount  in  base  vert. 
Motto—''  Fide  et  fortitudine." 

[These  are  of  no  authority,  being  an  adaptation  of  the  arms  of  Farquharson 
of  Invercauld.] 

BALLYMENA  (Co.  Antrim).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  in  use  are,  azure, 
a  representation  of  the  Castle  of  Ballymenagh  within  an  orle  of  six  towers  all 
proper.  Motto — "  Post  praelia  praemia  "  (spelled  so  upon  the  town  seal).  The 
foregoing  arms  are  taken  from  a  sculptured  stone  over  the  gateway  of  Lord 
Waveney's  Castle,  Ballymena,  and  are  there  shown  upon  an  escutcheon  within 
the  legend  "  Ballymenagh  of  the  Seven  Towers." 


BANBRIDGE 
(Co.  Down).  Has 
no  armorial  bear- 
ings, but  makes 
use  of  the  follow- 
ing, namely,  party 
per  fesse  the  chief 
per  pale  or  and 
purpure,  and  the 
base  azure,  on  a 
fesse    argent    be- 


tween in  chief  on 
the  dexter  side  a 
pearl,  on  the  sin- 
ister side  a  garb, 
and  ill  base  a 
spinning-wheel,  a 
shuttle  fessewise 
all  proper.  Motto 
— "Per  Deum  et 
industriam." 


BANBRIDGE 
54 


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BALIOL  COLLEGE 


BALLARAT,  SEE  OF 


BALLATER 


BALLYMENA 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BANBURY  (Oxfordshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  which  was 
recorded  at  the  visitation  of  the  County  of  Oxford  represents  the  branch  of  a 
tree  with  flowers  and  fruit  and  underneath  the  letters  B  A.  The  present 
seal  represents  upon  an  escutcheon  a  sun  in  splendour.  This  design  is  now  used 
as  the  arms  of  the  borough,  the  field  being  quoted  as  azure  and  the  sun  or. 
The  motto  is  "  Dominus  nobis  sol  &  scutum." 

BANCHORY  (Co.  Kincardine).  Has  no  arms.  The  device  upon  the  seal  consists 
of  three  escutcheons  :  (a)  argent,  three  holly  leaves  in  chief  vert,  and  in  base  a 
hunting  horn  sable  stringed  gules  (Burnett  of  Leys) ;  (b)  Burnett  of  Leys  as  above 
impaling  Ramsay  of  Balmain,  viz.,  argent,  an  eagle  displayed  sable  ;  (c)  azure  on 
a  fesse  between  three  pheons  argent,  a  stag  lodged  gules  (Davidson  of 
Inchmarlo). 

BAN  DON  (Co.  Cork).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office. 
Upon  a  sheet  of  Irish  Arms  published  by  Messrs  Marcus  Ward  &  Company, 
Ltd.,  it  is  credited  with  the  following  (taken  from  the  seal),  namely,  azure,  over 
water  in  base  proper,  a  bridge  of  seven  arches,  thereon  at  either  end  an 
embattled  gateway  domed,  argent,  in  the  centre  chief  point  an  escutcheon  parted 
per  bend  embattled  of  the  last  and  gules,  surmounted  by  an  Earl's  coronet 
proper.     (The  arms  of  Boyle,  Earls  of  Cork  and  Orrery.) 

BANFF,  County  of.     Has  no  arms. 

BANFF,  Town  of  (Banffshire).  The  entry  in  Lyon  Register  is  as  follows  : — 
"The  Ro}'all  Burgh  of  Banff"  gives  for  Efisignes  Ariiioriall  Q\A&s  the  Virgine- 
Mary  with  her  Babe  in  her  Armes  or."     Motto — "  Omne  Bonum  Dei  Donum." 

BANGOR  (Carnarvonshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Burke's  "  General  Armory  " 
quotes  the  arms  as  the  same  as  those  of  the  See  of  Bangor,  which  are  "  Gules,  a 
bend  or,  guttee-de-poix  between  two  mullets  pierced  argent."  The  seal  of  the 
Corporation,  however,  has  an  escutcheon  gules,  on  a  bend  or,  guttee-de-poix,  a 
bend  wavy  azure,  thereon  a  representation  of  a  mace  .  .  .,  all  between  two 
mullets  argent.  Crest — A  griffin  couchant.  The  Corporation  notepaper  shows 
(presumably)  a  copy  of  the  seal  minus  its  legend,  but  the  colours  of  the 
escutcheon  are  there  changed ;  but  as  they  become  "  metal  upon  metal,"  and 
this  is  therefore  a  breach  of  heraldic  law,  little  attention  need  be  paid  to  it. 


56 


rmnmnn 


BANDON 


BANBURY 


BANFF 


BANGOR 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BANGOR,  See  of.  Gules,  a  bend  argent,  gutte  de  poix  between  two  mullets  pierced 
of  the  second. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

These  arms  first  appear  on  the  seal  of  Bishop  Merrick  (1559-1566). 

BANGOR,  Dean  of.     Argent,  an  abbot  in  pontificals  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

BANK.     See   Bank   of   England    and    Bank    of   Scotland   hereunder,  and    refer    to 
Aberdeen  Town  and  County  Bank,  Edinburgh  and  Glasgow  Bank,  Manchester 
and    Liverpool    District    Banking    Company,    Manchester    and    Salford    Bank, 
'    National  Bank  of  Scotland,  North  of  Scotland  Banking  Company. 

BANK  OF  ENGLAND.  Has  no  arms,  but  as  a  device  both  upon  its  seal  and 
bank-notes,  the  figure  of  Britannia  is  made  use  of. 

BANK  OF  SCOTLAND,  Governor  and  Company  of.  "  Azur  a  Sanct 
Andrew's  cross  argent  betwixt  four  bezants.  On  a  suteable  helmet  mantled 
azur,  doubling  argent  and  wreath  of  their  colours  is  sett  for  their  crest  a 
Cornu-copia  diffuseing  money  or,  supported  by  two  women,  she  on  the  dexter 
representing  Abundance  holding  in  her  hand  a  Cornu-copia  as  the  former,  and 
that  on  the  sinister  representing  Justice  and  holding  in  her  hand  a  balance. 
The  Motto  in  Escroll  above,  "Tanto  uberior."  Devise  ("  under  which  their  notes 
do  circulat ")  being  "  Scotia  represented  by  a  Lady  holding  in  her  right  hand  a 
Cornu-copia  pouring  out  money,  and  in  her  left  a  thistle  with  these  words  over 
it,  "  Tanto  uberior." 

[Granted    ist  March  1701,  and   recorded  in   Lyon   Register  20th  February 
1849.     The  supporters  are  habited  in  green  over  a  white  underskirt.] 


58 


DEAN  OF  BANGOR 


BANGOR,  SEE  OF 


BANK  OF  SCOTLAND 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BAR.     Azure,  seme  of  crosslets  fitchee  or,  over  all  two  barbel  addorsed  of  the  last. 

BARATONGA.  No  warrant  has  been  issued  assigning  arms,  but  the  Admiralty 
publish  as  the  "  Ensign  "  of  Baratonga  a  flag  gules,  charged  with  a  fesse  argent, 
thereon  three  mullets  of  five  points  azure. 

BARBADOS.  No  arms  have  as  yet  been  assigned,  but  Walker  granted  a  seal  with 
an  allegorical  device.  The  Admiralty  publishes  as  a  device  for  use  upon  the 
Union  Flag  a  disc  representing  Britannia  drawn  upon  the  sea  by  sea-horses. 
This  device  has  also  appeared  upon  the  postage  stamps. 

BARBADOS,   See  of.      Azure,   a  crosier  and  key   in   saltire  between  in  chief  the 
Imperial  Crown  or,  and  in  base  an  estoile  argent. 
[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.] 

BARBERS  AND  SURGEONS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incor- 
porated 1462.  United  with  the  Surgeons  by  Act  of  Parliament  32,  Henry  VIII.) 
Quarterly  :  i  and  4,  sable,  a  chevron  between  three  fleams  argent ;  2  and  3, 
per  pale  argent  and  vert,  a  spater  in  pale  of  the  first,  surmounted  of  a  rose 
gules  charged  with  another  of  the  first,  the  first  rose  regally  crowned  proper, 
between  the  four  quarters  a  cross  of  St  George  gules,  charged  with  a  lion 
passant  guardant  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  an  opinicus  with 
wings  indorsed  or.  Supporters — Two  lynxes  proper,  spotted  of  various  colours 
azure,  gules,  vert,  or  and  argent,  both  ducally  collared  and  chained  argent. 
Motto — "  De  prffiscientire  Dei."     Mantled  gules  doubled  argent. 

[The  arms  in  the  first  and  fourth  quarters  are  those  of  the  Barbers,  and  in 
the  second  and  third  those  of  the  Surgeons,  these  being  originally  granted  22nd 
September  145 1.  This  grant  is  printed  "Misc.  Gen.  et  Her.,"  i.  11.  The  arms 
were  renewed  lOth  June  1561,  approved  and  granted  by  Dethick,  Garter,  Cooke 
Clarenceux  and  Flower,  Norrey,  2nd  June  1569,  and  again  confirmed  1634.] 

Original  arms  of  the  Barber-Surgeons  were,  "  Sable,  a  chevron  between 
three  fleams  argent,"  original  cognizance  of  the  Surgeons'  Company  granted 
by  King  Henry  VIII.,  "a  spater  charged  with  a  rose  gules  crowned  or."  An 
augmentation  to  the  arms  of  the  Barber-Surgeons  was  subsequently  granted  by 
Hervey,  1 561.  "  A  chief  paly  argent  and  vert,  on  a  pale  gules,  a  lion  passant  or, 
between  two  spaters  argent,  on  each  a  double  rose  gules  and  argent,  crowned 
or."     Crest  and  supporters  as  above. 

BARBER-SURGEONS  (Exeter).     Quarterly  sable  and    argent,   over   all    on  a 
cross  gules,  a  lion  passant  guardant  or,  on  the   ist  and  4th  quarters  a  chevron 
between  three  fleams  argent  on  the  2nd  and   3rd  quarters,  a  rose  gules,  seeded 
or,  barbed  vert,  regally  crowned  proper.     Motto — "  De  praescientia;  Dei." 
[No  authority.] 


60 


BAR 


BARBADOS,  SEE  OF 


COMPANY  OF  BARBERS  AND  SURGEONS 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BARBER-SURGEONS,  Company  of  (Dublin).  Parted  by  a  cross  of  England 
charged  with  a  lion  passant  guardant  crowned  or,  these  two  coats-armour 
quartered,  the  first  argent,  a  chevron  gules  betwixt  3  cinquefoils  azure,  the 
second  azure  a  harp  crowned  or,  the  third  as  the  second,  the  fourth  as  the 
first.  Crest  on  a  wreath  argent  and  gules,  St  Mary  Magdalene.  Mantling,  gules 
and  argent.  Supported  by  a  Leopard  proper  and  an  Irish  Greyhound  argent, 
each  gorged  with  a  ducal  coronet  and  standing  on  a  Scroll  with  their  motto, 
viz.,  "  Christi  salus  nostra." 

[Granted  by  Wm.  Roberts,  Ulster  King  of  Arms,  circa  1645.] 
The    grant    recites   that   these  arms  may  be    used   at    the   funerals   of  the 
members  of  the  Company. 

BARCELONA  (Spain).  Quarterly  :  i  and  4,  argent,  a  cross  gules  ;  2  and  3,  or, 
four  pallets  gules. 

BARKING,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arm.s. 

BARNARD'S  INN  (London).  Per  pale  indented  ermine  and  sable,  a  chevron 
gules,  fretty  or. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

BARNSLEY  (Yorkshire).  Argent,  on  a  chevron  gules,  between  two  shuttles 
fessewise  in  chief,  and  in  base  as  many  pickaxes  in  saltire  proper,  a  falcon 
wings  elevated  and  holding  in  the  dexter  claw  a  padlock  or,  between  two  boars' 
heads  couped  of  the  last,  each  holding  in  the  mouth  a  cross  pattee  fitchee  in 
pale  of  the  first,  a  chief  sable,  thereon  a  cross  pattee  between  two  covered  cups 
also  or.  Crest — A  gryphon  argent,  wings  elevated  sable,  resting  the  dexter 
claw  on  an  escutcheon  also  argent,  charged  with  a  shuttle  palewise  also  sable. 
Supporters — On  the  dexter  side  a  miner,  his  pit  lamp  suspended  from  his  neck, 
supporting  in  his  exterior  hand  a  pick-axe  proper.  On  the  sinister  side  a  glass- 
blower,  supporting  in  his  exterior  hand  a  blowpipe,  issuaut  therefrom  in  base  a 
glass  bottle,  all  proper.     Motto — "  Spectemur  agendo." 

[Arms  and  crest  granted  by  Sir  Albert  William  Woods,  Knt.,  Garter 
Principal  King  of  Arms;  Robert  Laurie,  Clarenccux  King  of  Arms;  Walter 
Aston  Blount,  Norroy  King  of  Arms,  12th  November  1869.  Supporters 
granted  13th  August  1913.] 


62 


BARCELONA  (SPAIN) 


BARNARD'S  INN 


BARNSLEY 


THE  BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

BARNSTAPLE  (Devonshire).     Gules,  a  castle  argent. 

Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.     Visitation  of  Devonshire,  1620. 

BARRHEAD.  Has  no  arms.  Those  in  use  are  derived  from  the  arms  of  the  old 
Dukedom  of  Lennox,  viz.,  Quarterly,  i  and  4  azure,  three  fleurs-de-lis  within  a 
bordure  engrailed  or;  2  and  3,  three  hearts  each  charged  with  a  cross  within  the 
double  tressure  ;  over  all  an  inescutcheon  of  the  arms  of  Lennox  argent,  a  saltire 
engrailed  between  four  roses  gules  Crest — A  bull's  head  crowned.  Supporters 
— Two  wolves.  Motto — "  Virtute  et  labore." 
[All  quite  bogus.] 

BARROW-IN-FURNESS  (Lancashire).  Gules,  on  a  bend  between  a  serpent 
nowed  in  chief  and  a  stag  trippant  in  base  or,  an  arrow  pointing  upwards  to  a 
bee  volant  proper,  upon  a  chief  argent,  on  waves  of  the  sea  a  paddle-wheel 
steamship  under  steam  and  canvas  also  proper.  Crest — Out  of  the  battlements 
of  a  tower  a  ram's  head  proper,  armed  and  collared  or.     Motto — "  Semper  sursum." 

Granted  by  Sir  Charles  George  Young,  Knt.,  Garter  Principal  King  of 
Arms  ;  Robert  Laurie,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms  ;  Walter  Aston  Blount,  Norroy 
King  of  Arms,  13th  December  1867. 

The  ram's  head  is  an  allusion  to  the  fact  that  Sir  James  Ramsden  (of  Furness 
Abbey)  was  the  principal  landowner  in  the  district. 


64 


BARRHEAD 


BARNSTAPLE 


BARROW-IN-FURNESS 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
BARROW-IN-FURNESS,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan,  he  has  no  official  arms. 

BASINGSTOKE  (Hampshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents 
the  Archangel  Michael  holding  in  his  dexter  hand  a  sword  and  in  his  sinister 
a  spear,  and  standing  upon  the  body  of  a  dragon  lying  upon  its  back,  the  spear 
thrust  through  the  neck  of  the  dragon.  The  legend  is  "  Sigillum  comune  ville 
de  Basingstoke  com  Sovthton." 

BASKET  MAKERS,  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  Azure,  three  cross 
baskets  in  pale  argent  between  a  prime  and  an  iron  on  the  dexter  and  a 
cutting-knife  and  an  outsticker  on  the  sinister  of  the  second.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  a  cradle,  therein  a  child,  rocked  at  the  head  by  a  girl 
and  at  the  feet  by  a  boy  both  vested  all  proper.  Motto — "  Let  us  love  one 
another." 

[These  arms  are  of  no  authority.] 

BASLE,  (Switzerland).     Argent,  the  head  of  a  crozier  sable. 

BASLE,  Canton  (Switzerland).  Argent,  the  head  of  a  crosier  sable.  Supporter — 
Dexter,  a  wyvern  proper. 

BASUTOLAND.     No  warrant  assigning  arms  has  as  yet  been  issued  to  Basutoland. 

BATH,  City  of  (Somersetshire).  Party  per  fesse  embattled  azure  and  argent,  the 
base  masoned,  in  chief  two  bars  wavy  of  the  second,  over  all  a  sword  in  pale  gules, 
hilt  and  pommel  or. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

The  arms  are  blazoned  in  Burke,  however,  as  party  per  fesse  embattled 
azure  and  gules,  the  base  masoned  sable  and  charged  with  two  crosses  bottonnee 
of  the  last  as  fortifications;  in  chief  two  bars  wavy  argent,  over  all  a  sword  in 
pale  of  the  last,  hilt  and  pommel  or,  on  the  blade  a  key. 

The  Corporation  have  assumed  and  use  as  Supporters  on  the  dexter  side  a 
lion  and  on  the  sinister  a  bear,  but  these  are  of  absolutely  no  authority.  Berry 
adds  a  note  that  in  a  manuscript  in  the  British  Museum,  No.  1445,  the  arms  of 
Bath  are  thus  blazoned,  viz.,  per  fesse  embattled  gules  and  water  proper,  viz.,  the 
base  water  proper,  the  chief  masoned  sable,  over  all  a  sword  in  pale  argent,  hilt 
and  pommel  or.  And  the  like  arms  are  painted  on  the  roof  of  the  Abbey  Church 
at  Bath. 


66 


BASLE 


BASKET  MAKERS'   COMPANY 


BATH 


BASLE,  CANTON 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BATH  ABBEY.     Azure,  two  keys  in  bend  sinister  addorsed  and  conjoined  in  the 
bows,  interlaced  with  a  sword  in  bend  dexter,  all  argent. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.j 

BATH  KING  OF  ARMS.     No  arms  have  as  yet  been  assigned  to  this  office. 

BATH  COLLEGE.      Uses  the  arms  of  the  City  of  Bath,  with  the  motto,  "  Possunt 
quia  posse  videntur." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

BATH  AND  WELLS,  See  of  Azure,  a  saltire  per  saltire  and  quarterly  or  and 
argent. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

These  are  the  arms  of  Wells  only,  the  See  in  fact,  though  having  a  double 
name,  being  but  one  bishopric  of  which  the  seat  is  at  Wells.  Burke's  Peerage 
states  the  arms  of  the  See  of  Bath  to  have  been  identical  with  those  of 
Winchester  save  that  the  field  is  azure. 

Debrett's  "Peerage"  gives  "the  coat  of  Wells  charged  for  Bath  Abbey  with  a 
crosier  argent  in  pale  between  a  sword  in  bend  sinister  and  two  keys  in  bend 
addorsed  and  conjoined  in  the  bows  proper."  This  combination  appears  on  the 
seal  of  Bishop  Bekington  (1443-65)  and  without  the  crosier  on  the  seal  of 
Bishop  Montagu  (1608-16),  but  either  form  appears  to  be  unauthorised. 

Crockford  impales  the  Arms  of  Bath  (dexter),  as  quoted  by  Burke,  with 
those  of  Wells  (sinister).     This  combination  is  also  spurious. 

BATHGATE  (Co.  Linlithgow).  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  is  rather  wonderful,  of  the 
landscape  variety.     Motto — "  Commune  bonum  intra  mures." 

BATHURST,  See  of  (Australia).       Azure,  two  pastoral  staves  in  saltire  proper 
between  four  estoiles  argent,  in  chief  a  Paschal  lamb  of  the  second. 
[Of  no  authority.] 


68 


BATH  ABBEY 


BATH  AND  WELLS,  SEE  OF 


BATHURST,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BATLEY  (Yorkshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  displays  an  escutcheon 
party  per  chevron  azure  and  argent,  on  a  chevron  gules  between  in  chief  a 
fleece  on  the  dexter  side  and  a  garb  on  the  sinister  side  (?  both  or),  and  in  base 
a  cross  patonce  lozenge  pierced  sable,  three  mullets  of  six  points  .  .  .  Crest — 
A  dove  (?)  holding  in  its  beak  a  branch.     Motto — "  Floreat  industria." 

BATTERSEA,  Borough  of  (London).  Has  no  arms.  Those  in  use  are  per  pale 
indented  azure  and  argent.  Crest — A  dove  holding  in  its  beak  an  olive  branch, 
all  proper. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

BATTERY-WORKS.     Refer  to  Mineral  and  Battery  Works,  Society  of. 

BAVARIA,  Kingdom  of.  Quarterly:  i,  Sable,  a  lion  rampant  double  queued  or, 
crowned  gules  (Palatinate  of  the  Rhine);  2,  per  fesse  dancette  gules  and  argent 
(Franken) ;  3,  bendy  sinister  of  six  argent  and  gules,  a  pale  or  (Burgau) ; 
4,  argent,  a  lion  rampant  azure,  crowned  or  (Veldenz) ;  over  all  on  an  in- 
escutcheon  the  arms  of  Bavaria  fusilly  bendy  argent  and  azure.  Supporters — 
Two  lions  regardant  queue  fourche  proper,  crowned  or. 


70 


BATLEY 


BATTERSEA 


BAVARIA 


THE   BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

BAXTERS  (Bakers).  Incorporated  Trade  (Edinburgh).  Azure,  on  a  chief  wavy 
or,  charged  with  two  bars  wavy  of  the  field,  a  dexter  hand  issuing  from  a  cloud 
proper,  suspending  a  balance  and  scales  between  three  garbs  of  the  second  two 
and  one. 

[Not  matriculated  in  Ljon  Register.     Refer  sub  Edinburgh.] 

BEAUMARIS  (Angflesea).  Has  no  arinoiial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  an 
ancient  ship  with  one  mast  and  sail  furled.  At  the  masthead  is  flying  a  doubly, 
forked  pennon,  and  just  below  the  pennon  and  above  the  sail  is  fixed  to  the 
dexter  side  of  the  mast  a  tower.  Below  on  the  dexter  side  of  the  mast  is  an 
escutcheon  charged  with  three  lions  pa.ssant  guardant,  and  on  the  sinister  side  a 
castle  with  four  towers.  The  legend  is  "  SI.  commune  communitatis  ville  de 
Beaumaris."  Berry  adds  a  note,  the  Corporation  used  for  arms,  gules,  three  lions 
passant  guardant  or. 

BECCLES  (Suffolk).  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  represents  a  minster  or  church  with 
the  legend  "  Sigillum  concilii  municip.  Becclesise." 

BECHUANALAND  PROTECTORATE.     No  arms  exist  for  this  Protectorate. 

BEDFORD,  County  of.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Upon  a  coloured  sheet  of  the 
"  Arms  of  the  Counties  of  England  and  Wales,"  which  has  been  published,  a 
kind  of  travesty  upon  the  seal  of  the  town  of  Bedford  is  given,  namely,  argent, 
an  eagle  displayed  with  wings  inverted  and  surmounted  upon  the  breast  with  a 
quadrangular  castle  gules.  It  is  of  course  of  no  authority.  The  seal  of  the 
County  Council,  however,  shows  the  following  arms,  apparently  invented 
therefor,  namely,  argent,  on  a  mount,  a  tree,  in  base  water  all  proper,  on  a 
chief  azure,  a  plough  of  the  second,  between  on  the  dexter  side  a  garb  or,  and 
on  the  sinister  a  pair  of  cloth  shears  also  proper. 

BEDFORD  (Bedfordshire).  Argent,  an  eagle  displayed,  and  with  wings  inverted 
looking  towards  the  sinister  sable,  ducally  crowned  or,  and  surmounted  upon  its 
breast  by  a  castle  of  three  degrees  or. 

Confirmed  to  the  Mayor,  Bayliffes,  Burgesses,  and  Commonalty  of  the 
Town  of  Bedford  by  William  Hervey,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms,  7th  June  1566. 

Prior  to  this  in  the  records  of  the  College  of  Arms  is  an  entry  also  signed 
by  William  Hervey,  Clarenceux,  of  the  Coat  "  per  pale  argent  and  gules,  a  fess 
azure,"  with  the  note,  "  These  Arms  are  of  Aunceentie  belonging  and  apperteyn. 
ing  to  ye  Towne  and  Borough  of  Bedford  tyme  out  of  mynd." 

[Burke  blazons  the  eagle  as  gules.'] 

BEDFORD  COLLEGE  FOR  WOMEN  (London).  Argent,  between  two 
flaunches  paly  bendy  or  and  sable,  a  cross  patee  throughout  gules,  voided 
of  the  field,  surmounted  by  an  open  book  of  the  second,  on  a  chief  of  the  third 
an  antique  lamp  gold  inflamed  proper. 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  13th  August  1913.] 

72 


v^^^ 


BAXTERS  (BAKERS) 


BEDFORD 


BEDFORD  COLLEGE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BEDLAM.     Refer  to  Bethlehem. 

BEDWIN,  GREAT.     See  Great  Bedwin. 

BELFAST  (Co.  Antrim).  Party  per  fesse  argent  and  azure,  in  chief  a  pile  vair,  and 
on  a  canton  gules  a  bell  argent;  in  base,  a  ship  with  sails  set  argent,  on  waves 
of  the  sea  proper.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  wolf  proper,  ducally  gorged  and 
chained  or ;  (sinister)  a  sea-horse  gorged  with  a  mural  crown  proper.  Crest — 
A  sea-horse  gorged  with  a  mural  crown  proper.  Motto — "  Pro  tanto  quid 
retribuamus." 

Granted  by  Sir  John  Bernard  Burke,  C.B.,  Ulster  King  of  Arms,  30th  June 
1890. 

Upon  a  seal  referred  to  in  the  will  of  Henry  Le  Squire,  dated  1643,  and 
which  is  still  in  existence,  the  arms  exactly  as  granted  are  engraved,  with  the 
solitary  exception  that  the  two  sea-horses  are  without  mural  coronets,  and  that 
they  are  surmounted  by  an  Esquire's  helmet  and  mantling.  "  Master  Le  Squire  " 
above  mentioned  was  sovereign  of  the  town  1635-36  and  '39.  He  was  then 
agent  and  seneschal  to  the  Lord  Edward  Chichester.  The  dexter  supporter  and 
the  pile  vair  are  of  course  derived  from  the  Chichester  achievement. 

In  Burke's  "  General  Armory"  the  arms  are  wrongly  blazoned  as  per  fess 
argent  and  azure,  in  chief  a  pile  vair,  in  base  a  ship  with  sails  set  of  the  field,  on  a 
canton  of  the  second,  a  tower  of  the  first.  Crest — A  sea-horse  proper.  Supporters 
— (Dexter)  a  wolf,  (sinister)  a  sea-horse,  both  proper.  The  grant  is  certainly 
dated  later  than  the  last  edition  of  the  "  Armory,"  but  the  arms,  so  far  as  the 
Editor  is  able  to  ascertain,  have  never  been  so  used.  This  description  of  them 
appears  to  have  been  taken  from  a  note  in  the  handwriting  of  Sir  William 
Betham,  Ulster  King  of  Arms.  For  some  reason  the  sea-horses  have  been 
frequently  wrongly  credited  with  wings.  An  interesting  pamphlet  to  which  I 
am  indebted  has  been  published,  entitled,  "  An  Enquiry  into  the  History  and 
Authenticity  of  the  Belfast  Arms,"  and  is  by  John  Vinycomb,  F.S.A. 

BELFAST,  Queen's  University  of.     Refer  to  University. 

BELGIUM,  Kingdom  of.  Sable,  a  lion  rampant  or.  Supporters — Two  crowned 
lions  rampant  or,  each  holding  a  banner  tierced  in  pale  sable,  or,  and  gules. 
Motto — "  L'union  fait  la  force." 


74 


BELFAST 


BELGIUM 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BELTURBET  (Co.  Cavan).  Or,  a  tower  with  dome  and  pennon  gules,  in  base 
waves  of  the  sea  proper ;  on  a  chief  azure,  a  harp  of  the  field,  between  on  the 
dexter  side  a  rose  argent,  and  on  the  sinister  a  thistle,  also  proper. 

[Granted  by  Molyneux,  Ulster  King  of  Arms.] 

There  is  no  official  record  of  the  grant,  but  a  very  rough  pen-and-ink  sketch 
with  the  following  note  is  amongst  other  papers  [bound  up  in  Ulster's  Office  and 
labelled  "  Draft  Grants  "].  The  "  waves  of  the  sea  "  in  the  sketch  are  represented 
in  the  old  heraldic  way  as  barry  wavy  azure  and  argent. 

"  The  Armes  of  the  Toune  or  Borogh  of  Beoltirbert  in  the  County  of  Cavan, 
set  forth  at  the  request  of  Stephen  Butler  als  Botterler  Eqr.  first  Provost  of  that 
Borogh  and  at  the  request  of  the  free  burgesses  of  the  same  for  Confirmation 
whereof  I  have  heere  onto  set  my  hand  and  Seale  this  2ith  of  June,  Ano.  Dni. 
1613,  the  eleventh  yeere  of  the  raigne  of  the  most  high  and  mightie  Prince 
James  by  the  grace  of  God  King  of  greate  Britaine  France  &  Ireland, 
defender  of  the  fayth  &c." 

BENDIGO,  See  of.     Quarterly:  i,  two  bendlets  wavy;  2,  a  spade  and  pickaxe  in 
saltire  ;  3,  a  garb  ;  4,  a  bunch  of  grapes. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

BERGEN  (Norway).     Azure,  on  rocks  in  base  vert,  a  castle  triple-towered  argent. 

BERKHAMSTEAD  (Hertfordshire).     Or,  a  castle  embattled  triple-towered  and 
domed  azure,  on  each  of  the  outer  domes  a  banner  argent,  charged  with  a  cross 
gules,  all  within  a  bordure  sable,  bezantee. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

BERKHAMSTED  SCHOOL.  Per  pale  dexter  gules  two  swords  in  saltire  points 
upwards  proper,  in  the  centre  chief  point  the  letter  "  D  "  impaling  sinister  argent, 
on  a  bend  gules  a  naked  man  holding  in  his  dexter  hand  above  his  head  a 
(?  wreath  or  wrestling  collar),  and  in  the  dexter  chief  point  a  duck,  all  proper. 
Motto — "  Virtus  laudata  crescit." 

[Of  no  authority:  they  are  really  the  arms  of  the  founder.  Dean  Incent  of 
St  Paul's,  temp.  Henry  VIII.] 

BERKSHIRE,  County  of.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Upon  a  coloured  sheet  of 
the  "  Arms  of  the  Counties  of  England  and  Wales,"  which  has  been  published, 
it  is  credited  with  "Gules  five  heads  affrontee  in  saltire  argent  couped  in  some 
peculiar  manner  below  the  shoulders  vested  azure  and  crowned  (with  most 
peculiar  coronets)  or."  This  is  evidently  a  perversion  of  the  seal  and  arms 
of  Reading. 


76 


BENDIGO,   SEE  OF 


BERKHAMSTEAD  SCHOOL 


BERKHAMSTEAD 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BERLIN  (Prussia).  Per  pale  dexter  argent,  an  eagle  displayed  sable,  crowned 
and  with  Sachsen  or,  and  charged  on  the  breast  with  a  gold  cypher  of  the  letters 
F.  R.  the  dexter  claw  holding  an  orb  azure,  banded  and  surmounted  by  a  cross 
also  or,  the  sinister  claw  holding  a  sceptre  (for  Prussia) :  sinister,  argent,  an 
eagle  displayed  gules  with  Sachsen  or,  on  the  head  an  Electoral  Bonnet  proper 
on  the  breast  an  escutcheon  azure,  charged  with  a  sceptre  in  pale  or,  the  dexter 
claw  holding  a  sceptre  and  the  sinister  a  sword  proper  (for  Brandenburg)  on  an 
inescutcheon  in  base,  surmounted  by  a  mural  crown  or,  the  old  arms  of  the  city 
of  Berlin,  namely  argent,  a  bear  rampant  sable. 

BERMONDSEY,  Borough  of  (London).  Quarterly  azure  and  gules,  in  chief  a 
lion  passant  guardant  supporting  with  the  dexter  paw  a  crosier  erect  between 
two  Roman  B's,  in  the  third  quarter  a  battle-axe  erect,  blade  to  the  sinister 
entiled  by  a  ducal  coronet,  and  in  the  fourth  quarter  an  ancient  ship  of  three 
masts,  sails  set  and  flags  flying  to  the  dexter,  all  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  a  lion  passant  guardant  gules  charged  on  the  shoulder  with  a  Roman  B, 
supporting  with  the  dexter  paw  a  crosier  erect,  both  or.  Motto — "  Prosunt 
gentibus  artes." 

[Granted  25th  March  1901.] 

BERMUDAS,  The  (or  Somers  Islands,  otherwise  the  Summer  Islands). 
Argent,  on  a  mount  vert,  a  lion  sejant  aff"ronte  gules,  supporting  between  the 
fore-paws  an  antique  shield  azure  thereon  a  representation  of  the  wreck  of  the 
ship  "  The  Sea  Venture  "  (A.D.  1609)  all  proper.     Motto—''  Quo  fata  ferunt." 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  19 10.] 

[The  edge  of  the  antique  shield  is  gold.  The  "  Sea  Venture"  was  the  ship 
of  Admiral  Sir  George  Somers,  who  first  colonized  the  islands.] 

BERMU  DAS  COM  PAN  Y  (The  Company  of  Merchants  of  the  Summer  Islands). 
Argent  a  ship  in  a  wrought  sea  wrecked  between  two  rocks,  all  proper.  Crest — 
On  a  wreath  of  the  colours  (argent  and  gules)  on  a  mount  vert,  a  boar  standing 
between  two  palm-trees  proper.  Supporters — Two  Tritons  proper.  Motto — 
"  Periissemus  nisi  periissemus." 

[Granted  by  Borough,  Garter  1635.     Misc.  Gts.,  iv.  5.] 

BERNARD'S  INN.     Refer  to  Barnard's  Inn. 


78 


BERLIN 


|PR05UNT-6ENTlBLl5_^ 
BERMONDSEY 


THE  BERMUDAS 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BERNE,  Canton  (Switzerland).  Gules,  on  a  bend  or,  a  bear  passant  sable. 
Supporter — On  the  sinister  side  a  bear  rampant  sable,  girt  with  a  belt,  thereto  a 
sword  ;  all  proper. 

BERNE  (Switzerland).     Gule.s,  on  a  bend  or,  a  bear  passant  sable. 

BERVIE  (Kincardineshire).     Has  not  matriculated  any  arms.     The   seal  shows 
"  an  heraldic  rose  "  ;  and  "  Gules,  a  rose  argent,"  have  been  quoted  as  the  arms  ; 
but  the  oiificial  notepaper  of  the  town  is  stamped  with  a  rose  stalked  and  leaved, 
the  stalk  upwards,  within  the  legend  "  Bervie  Town  Arms  "  ! 
[A  little  heraldic  knowledge  might  not  be  amiss  in  Bervie.] 

BERWICK,  NORTH.     See  North  Berwick. 

BERWICK,  Council  of  the  County  of.  Argent,  on  a  mount  vert,  a  bear  sable, 
collared  and  chained  or,  standing  in  front  of  a  tree  proper. 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Office,  the  loth  day  of  October  1890.] 

BERWICK-UPON-TWEED  (Northumberland).  Has  no  armorial  bearings. 
The  seal  represents  a  bear  standing  upon  a  mount  and  against  a  tree  all  between 
two  escutcheons  each  charged  with  France  and  England  quarterly,  above  is 
placed  under  a  Gothic  canopy  the  figure  of  a  king  seated.  The  legend  is  "  Sigilii 
maioratus  villa  Berwici  super  Twedam."  In  Burke's  "  General  Armory  "  this  is 
blazoned  as  a  coat-of-arms  in  the  following  words  : — "  Ar.  or  a  mount  a  bear 
standing  against  a  tree,  all  ppr.,  the  bear  collared  and  chained  or,  in  fesse  two 
escutcheons,  on  each  the  Arms  of  France  and  England  quarterly,  on  a  chief  of 
the  first  (sic)  a  king  crowned  and  habited  of  the  second,  holding  in  his  dexter 
paw  (sic)  a  mount  and  in  the  sinister  a  sceptre,  both  gold."  Save  for  the 
anatomical  error,  and  that  the  chief  is  depicted  as  "azure,"  Debrett's  "  House  of 
Commons  "  follows  Burke,  but  adds  the  Motto,  "  Victoria  gloria  merces."  Upon 
the  seal  of  the  County  Council  of  Northumberland  the  arms  of  the  County 
of  Berwick  are  taken  and  used  as  the  arms  of  Berwick-upon-Tweed,  and  in  a 
description  of  the  seal  in  an  article  on  County  Council  seals  the  tree  is  called 
a  "  Wych-elm." 

BESANCON  (France).  Or,  a  double-headed  eagle  displayed  sable,  crowned  of 
the  field  and  armed  gules. 

BETHLEHEM  HOSPITAL.  (Founded  as  a  Priory  in  1247,  established  as  an 
hospital  for  lunatics  in  1446,  and  refounded  by  Edward  VI.  in  1546).  Argent, 
two  bars  sable,  a  label  of  five  points  throughout  gules,  on  a  chief  azure  an 
estoile  of  sixteen  points  or,  charged  with  a  plate,  thereon  a  cross  of  the  third 
between  a  human  skull  in  a  cup  on  the  dexter  side,  and  a  basket  of  bread,  i.e., 
wastell  cakes,  all  of  the  fifth,  on  the  sinister  side. 
[Of  no  authority.] 


80 


BERNE,  CANTON 


BERWICK,   COUNCIL  OF  THE 
COUNTY  OF 


BESANCON 


L  I  G 


BETHLEHEM  HOSPITAL 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BETHNAL  GREEN  (London).     Has  no  arms. 

BEVERLEY,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

BEVERLEY  (Yorkshire).  Argent,  three  bars  wavy  azure,  on  a  chief  of  the  last 
a  castor-beaver,  its  head  turned  biting  off  the  castor  {i.e.  the  fur)  or. 

These  are  the  arms  at  present  made  use  of,  but  in  the  visitation  books, 
drawings  of  three  distinct  seals  are  shown,  each  plainly  bearing  a  coat-of-arms, 
but  in  none  of  these  are  the  tinctures  marked.  The  first  shows  a  coat  .  .  .  three 
bars  wavy  .  .  .  and  in  chief  a  castor-beaver,  its  head  turned  and  biting  off  the 
castor.  This  has  the  legend  "  Beverlay."  The  second,  which  is  the  largest 
shows  a  coat  .  .  .  three  bars  wavj'  ...  on  a  chief  ...  a  castor-beaver,  its 
head  turned  biting  off  the  castor.  .  .  .  This  has  the  legend  "  Sigil.  '  Maior. 
Gubernat  et  Burgeus  Villre  de  Beverla.'"  The  third  seal,  which  in  size  is 
between  the  two,  shows  a  coat  quarterly  I  and  4  ...  an  eagle  displayed,  .  .  . 
ducally  crowned  ...  2  and  3  .  .  .  three  bars  wavy  .  .  .  and  in  chief  a  castor- 
beaver  with  its  head  turned  biting  off  the  castor.  .  .  . 

Burke  and  Berry  give  a  coat  which  agrees  with  none  of  the  foregoing, 
namely,  Quarterly  i  and  4  or,  an  eagle  displayed  azure,  2  and  3  argent,  three 
bars  wavy  azure,  on  a  chief  of  the  last  a  castor-beaver  with  his  head  turned 
biting  off  the  castor,  all  or. 

BEWDLEY  (Worcestershire).  Argent,  an  anchor  in  pale  azure,  the  anchor  sur- 
mounted with  a  fetterlock  or,  on  the  dexter  side  of  the  anchor  a  sword  erect  of 
the  second,  hilt  and  pommel  also  or,  on  the  sinister  side  of  the  anchor,  a  rose 
gules. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms,  at  the  Visitation  of  Worcester,  1634.] 

BEXHILL-ON-SEA,  Borough  of  (Sussex).  Ermine,  a  cross  double  parted  and 
fretted  gules  between  in  the  first  quarter  a  mitre  and  in  the  second  a  demi-lion 
passant  guardant  conjoined  to  the  demi-hulk  of  a  ship  both  or,  in  the  third  an 
estoile  sable,  and  in  the  fourth  a  mallard  proper,  on  a  chief  argent,  above  waves 
of  the  sea  a  demi-sun  in  splendour  issuant  from  the  upper  part  of  the  centre  of 
the  chief  also  proper,  all  within  a  bordure  azure  charged  with  eight  martlets  of 
the  third.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  on  a  mound  of  sand  a  Martello 
tower  proper.     Motto — "  Sol  et  salubritas.  " 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  21st  January  1907.] 

BIDEFORD  (Devonshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  a 
bridge  consisting  of  one  arch  and  two  demi-arches  over  a  river.  On  the  river  is 
a  single-masted  vessel,  one-half  of  which  appears  to  have  passed  through  the 
bridge,  but  with  the  mast  and  round  top  on  the  other  side. 


82 


BEVERLEY 


BEWDLEY 


BEXHILL-ON-SEA 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BIGGAR  (Lanarkshire).  Has  no  arms.  Bigger  rubbish  than  the  heraldry  of  its 
seal  one  would  have  to  travel  far  to  find.  The  shield  is  divided  per  pairle 
reversed,  the  dexter  side  showing  a  plough  in  a  ploughed  field  and  the  sinister 
a  garb  in  a  cornfield.  The  base  is  presumably  argent;  on  a  wreath  a  goat's 
head  erased.     Motto — "  Let  the  deed  shaw." 

BIRKENHEAD  (Cheshire).  Quarterly  or  and  argent,  on  a  cross  gules  between  a 
lion  passant  of  the  last  in  the  first  quarter,  an  oak  tree  issuant  from  a  mount 
proper  in  the  second,  an  estoile  azure  in  the  third,  and  two  lions  passant  of  the 
third  in  the  fourth,  a  crosier  in  pale  of  the  first,  and  two  crescents  in  fesse  of  the 
second.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  upon  a  rock  proper  in  front  of  a 
crosier  erect  or,  a  lion  azure  resting  the  dexter  paw  on  an  anchor  also  or, 
Motto — "  Ubi  fides  ibi  lux  et  robur." 

[This  grant,  dated  28th  August  1878,  is  printed  "  Hist.  Soc.  of  Lanes,  and 
Cheshire,"  xlii.  13.] 

BIRMINGHAM  (Warwickshire).  Quarterly  first  and  fourth  azure,  a  bend 
of  five  lozenges  or,  second  and  third  per  pale  indented  of  the  last  and  gules ; 
over  all  a  fesse  ermine,  thereon  a  mural  crown  of  the  second.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  a  mural  crown,  issuant  therefrom  a  dexter  arm  embowed, 
the  hand  holding  a  hammer  all  proper,  together  with  the  Motto,  "  Forward." 
Supporters — On  the  dexter  side  a  man  habited  as  a  smith  (representing  Industry), 
holding  in  the  dexter  hand  a  hammer  resting  on  an  anvil,  all  proper,  and  on  the 
sinister  side  a  female  figure  (representing  Art)  proper,  vested  argent,  wreathed 
round  the  temples  with  laurel  vert,  tied  by  a  riband  gules,  holding  in  the  dexter 
hand  resting  on  the  shield  a  book  bound,  also  gules,  and  in  the  sinister  a  painter's 
pallette  or,  with  two  brushes  proper. 

[The  arms  were  granted,  April  3,  1889,  and  the  supporters,  April  4,  1S89.] 


84 


BIRKENHEAD 


BIRMINGHAM 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BIRMINGHAM,    See    of.     Per    pale    indented  or  and    gules,  five  roundels,  two, 
two  and  one,  and  in  chief  two  crosses  pattee,  all  counterchanged. 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  1904.] 

BIRMINGHAM  UNIVERSITY.     Sec  University  of  Birmingham. 

BIRMINGHAM.     Refer  to  King  Edward's  Grammar  School. 

BISHOPS  CASTLE  (Shropshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  repre- 
sents a  domed  castle  with  the  letters  I.  R.  (James  Rex)  in  chief,  and  in  base  the 
date,  1609. 

BIT  MAKERS'  COMPANY.     Refer  to  Loriners'  Company. 

BLACKBURN  (Lancashire).  Argent,  a  fesse  wavy  sable,  between  three  bees 
volant  proper,  on  a  chief  vert,  a  bugle  stringed  argent,  between  two  fusils  or. 
Crest — A  shuttle  or,  thereon  a  dove,  wings  elevated  argent,  and  holding  in  its  beak 
the  thread  of  the  shuttle  reflexed  over  the  back  and  an  olive  branch  proper. 
Motto—'  Arte  et  labore." 

[Granted  by  Sir  Charles  George  Young,  Knt.,  Garter  Principal  King  of 
Arms,  J.  Pulman,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms,  Robert  Laurie,  Norroy  King  of 
Arms,  February  14,  1852.] 

BLACKPOOL,  Borough  of  (Lancashire).  Barry  wavy  of  eight  sable  and  or,  a 
seagull  volant  proper,  on  a  chief  argent,  a  thunderbolt  also  proper,  between  a 
fleur-de-lis  and  a  lion  rampant,  both  gules.  Crest — Upon  a  wreath  of  the  colours, 
on  the  battlements  of  a  tower  or,  the  sails  of  a  windmill  saltirewise  proper, 
surmounted  in  the  centre  by  a  rose  gules,  barbed  and  seeded,  also  proper 
Motto — "  Progress." 

[Granted  loth  June  1899.] 

BLACKSMITHS,  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  1325.)  Sable, 
a  chevron  or,  between  three  crowned  hammers  proper.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of 
the  colours,  a  mount  vert,  thereon  a  phoenix  with  wings  endorsed  proper  firing 
herself  with  the  sunbeams  of  the  last,  and  by  the  agitation  and  working  of  her 
wings  she  kindleth  certain  sticks  of  cinnamon  and  other  spices.  Motto — "By 
hammer  and  hand  all  arts  do  stand."  (Ancient  motto  —  "As  God  wills, 
so  be  it.") 

[Arms  confirmed  and  crest  altered  by  Sir  Wm.  Segar,  Garter,  24th  June 
1611.] 

BLACKSMITHS  and  SPURRIERS.  The  original  name  of  the  Blacksmiths' 
Company,  to  which  refer. 


86 


BIRMINGHAM,  SEE  OF 


BLACKBURN 


x^mt 


BLACKPOOL 


BLACKSMITHS,  COMPANY  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

BLACKSMITHS  OF  DUBLIN,  Corporation  of.  (Charter  14  Edward  IV.,  1474.) 
Sable,  on  a  chevron  between  three  hammers  argent,  crowned  or,  a  dexter  gauntlet 
between  two  steel  gads  sable.  Crest — On  a  wreath  argent  and  sable,  a  phoenix 
in  flames  of  fire  proper.  Mantling  gules,  doubled  argent.  Supported  on  the 
sinister  side  by  an  armed  man  holding  in  his  left  hand  a  shield  sable,  thereon 
a  hammer  argent  crowned  or,  and  on  the  dexter  side  a  dragon  azure  with  fire 
issuing  out  of  his  mouth  proper.     Motto — "  By  hammer  and  hand  all  arts  stand." 

[Granted  by  Carney,  Ulster,  March  20,  1656.] 

This  grant  recites  that  the  arms,  without  crest  and  supporters  or  motto, 
may  be  displayed  at  the  funerals  of  deceased  members  of  the  Companj-. 

BLAIRGOWRIE  (Perthshire).  Has  no  arms.  The  Burgh  Seal  was  designed  by 
Mr  John  A.  R.  Macdonald,  C.E.,  architect  of  that  town,  who  seems  proud  of  it. 
It's  about  as  appalling  as  any  to  be  found  amongst  the  Scottish  Police  Burgh 
Seals,  which  is  saying  a  good  deal.  The  shield  is  per  fesse  and  the  chief  per 
pale.  In  the  first  division  on  a  wreath  is  a  garb,  the  crest  of  Blair  of  Blair,  in 
the  second  on  a  wreath  is  a  birds'  nest,  not  forgetting  the  birds  (stated  to 
be  young  ravens  and  to  represent  the  crest  of  Drummond  of  Blair).  In 
base  is  a  representation  of  "ye  Brig  o'  Blair."  To  prevent  any  error  it  is  so 
labelled  underneath.  Motto — "  Bhlair  gobhainn  righ." 
[Quite  bogus,  of  course.] 

BLANDFORD  (Dorsetshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  which  is 
remarkably  well  cut,  shows  an  escutcheon  of  England,  viz.  (gules)  three  lions 
passant  guardant  in  pale  (or),  a  label  of  three  points  throughout  ermine  ;  on 
either  side  of  the  escutcheon  and  entwined  with  the  scroll-work  of  its  design  is 
an  ostrich  feather  erect,  and  all  between  the  letters  D.L.  The  legend  runs, 
"  Sigillvm  Bvrgentivm  Villae  de  Blanford  Forvm." 

BLOEMFONTEIN,    See   of  (South  Africa).     Azure,  a  saltire  argent,  over  all 
a  flaming  sword  erect  in  pale  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

BLUE-COAT  SCHOOL.     Refer  to  Christ's  Hospital. 

BLUEMANTLE  PURSUIVANT  OF  ARMS.     Badge— k  mantle  azure. 

BLUNDELL'S    SCHOOL   (Tiverton).      Gules,    two  pallets    argent.      Crest— r^ 
squirrel  sejant.     Motto — "  Pro  patria  populoque." 

[Of  no  authority.] 


88 


BLOEMFONTEIN,  SEE  OF 


'^ 

K 

) 

#1    * 

//u 

^/H-PO^ 


BLUNDELL'S  SCHOOL 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
BOARD  OF  ORDNANCE.     Refer  to  Ordnance. 

BODMIN  (Cornwall).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  a  king 
crowned  and  holding  in  his  dexter  hand  a  sceptre  and  seated  under  a  canopy. 
The  legend  is  "  Sigill.  comune  burgensium  Bodminie." 

BODY  GUARD  FOR  SCOTLAND,  The  King's.  Refer  to  Archers,  the  Royal 
Company  of. 

BOHEMIA.     Refer  to  Austria. 

BOLIVIA.     A  landscape — refer  to  illustration. 

BOLOGNA  (Italy).  Quarterly  :  i  and  4,  argent,  a  cross  gules,  on  a  chief  azure,  three 
fleurs-de-lis  or  separated  by  the  points  of  a  label  of  four  points  gules  ;  2  and  3, 
azure,  the  word  "  Libertas,"  in  letters  of  gold  in  bend  (or  bend  sinister). 

BOLTON  (Lancashire).  Gules,  two  bendlets  or,  a  shuttle  with  weft  pendent 
between  an  arrow  point  upwards  and  a  mule  spinning  spindle  in  chief  palewise 
all  of  the  last,  and  an  escocheon  in  base  of  the  second,  thereon  a  rose  of  the 
first,  barbed  and  seeded  proper.  Crest — Upon  a  rocky  moor,  an  elephant  statant 
proper,  on  its  back  a  castle  or,  and  thereon  a  rose,  as  in  the  arms,  the  trapping 
per  pale  gules  and  vert  and  charged  with  a  mitre,  also  or.  Motto — "  Supera 
moras." 

[Granted  by  Sir  Albert  William  Woods,  Knt,  Garter  Principal  King  of  Arms, 
Walter  Aston  Blount,  Clarenceu.x  King  of  Arms,  George  E.  Cokayne,  Norroy 
King  of  Arms,  June  S,  1890.] 


90 


zuz^ 


BOLOGNA 


BOLIVIA 


BOLTON 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BOMBAY,  Presidency  of.  No  warrant  assigning  arms  to  the  Presidency  of  Bombay 
has  as  yet  been  issued. 

BOMBAY,  City  of  Azure,  three  ships  under  sail  lateen  rigged  proper,  a  chief  or, 
thereon  a  lion  passant  guardant  gules,  between  tvvfo  pallets  sable,  each  charged 
with  an  ostrich  feather  erect  argent.  And  for  a  Crest — Upon  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  a  lion  passant  guardant  gules,  crowned  with  an  eastern  crown  gold, 
supporting  with  the  dexter  forepaw  an  escutcheon  or,  charged  with  a  sprig  of  the 
cotton-tree  slipped  and  fruited  proper.  And  for  Supporters — On  the  dexter  side 
a  lion  or,  and  on  the  sinister  side  a  leopard  proper,  each  gorged  with  an  eastern 
crown,  and  pendent  therefrom  an  escutcheon  azure,  charged  with  a  mullet  argent. 
Motto—''  Urbs  Prima  in  Indis." 

[Arms  and  crest  granted,  September  20,   1877,   and    supporters,  October 
2,  1877.] 

BOMBAY,  See  of     Sable,  a  key  in  bend  sinister  surmounted  by  a  crosier  in  saltier 
between  two  eastern  crowns  in  pale  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

BOMBAY  UNIVERSITY.     Refer  to  University. 

BO'NESS.     Has  no  arms.     Those  in  use  on  the  seal  are  "argent,  on  waves  of  the 
sea  a  three-masted  ship  in  full  sail,  all  proper."     Motto — "  Sine  metu." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

BONNET  MAKERS,  Incorporated  Trade  (Edinburgh).  Argent  a  fesse 
between  three  bonnets  azure  impaled  with  or,  a  chevron  gules  between  three 
woolpacks  proper. 

[Not  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register.     Refer  sub  Edinburgh.] 

BOOKBINDERS'  GUILD  (Germany).  Gules,  a  bookbinders'  press  or,  in  chief 
a  bound  book  of  the  last.  Crest — an  arm  brandishing  a  hammer  or  mallet  sable 
the  handle  or,  vested  in  a  sleeve  gules,  cuffed  or,  the  sleeve  continuing  into  a 
mantling  of  gules  and  or. 


92 


BOMBAY 


BOOKBINDERS'  GUILD 


BOMBAY,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BOOTLE-CUM-LINACRE  (Lancashire).  Argent,  on  a  chevron  between  three 
fleurs-de-lis  azure,  as  many  stags'  heads  caboshed  or,  on  a  chief  sable,  three  mural 
crowns  of  the  field.  Crest — Upon  a  rock  a  lighthouse  proper.  Motto — "  Respice 
aspice  prospice." 

[Granted  by  Sir  Albert  William  Woods,  Knt,  Garter  Principal  King  of  ArmS) 
Robert  Laurie,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms,  Walter  Aston  Blount,  Norroy  King  of 
Arms,  November  4,  1869.] 

BORDEAUX  (France).  Gules,  on  the  battlements  of  a  gateway  argent,  a  lion 
passant  or,  in  base  a  crescent  of  the  second,  a  chief  azure,  seme-de-lis  or 

BORNEO.  That  part  of  the  island  of  Borneo  which  is  British  Territory  is 
administered  by  the  British  North  Borneo  Company  to  which  refer., 

BORROWSTOUNNESS.     Refer  to  Bo'ness. 

BOSNEY  (Cornwall).  Burke  in  his  "General  Armory"  says,  "The  Seal  represents 
a  castle  with  three  towers  embattled  and  domed  and  joined  to  each  other  by  a 
circular  wall,  all  on  a  mount ;  in  the  base,  water." 

BOSNIA.  Gules,  issuing  from  the  sinister  flank  an  arm  embowed  proper,  vested 
gules  and  holding  a  sabre  argent.  , 


94 


BOOTLE-CUM-LINACRE 


P     4f      4b      4t 


BORDEAUX 


BOSNIA 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BOSTON  (Lincolnshire).  Sable,  three  coronets  composed  of  crosses  pattee  and 
fleurs-de-lis  in  pale  or.  Crest — A  woolpack  charged  with  a  ram  couchant  all 
proper.     Supporters — On  either  side  a  mermaid  proper,  ducally  crowned  azure. 

The  arms,  crest,  and  supporters  were  allowed  and  confirmed,  ist  December 
1 568,  by  Robert  Cook,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms. 

BOSTON  SCHOOL  (Boston,  Lincolnshire).     Uses  the  arms  of  the  town. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

BOTTLEMAKERS'  AND  HORNERS'  COMPANY.  This  is  the  ancient  name 
of  the  Homers'  Company  to  which  refer. 

BOUILLON.     Refer  to  Liege,  Bishopric  of 

BOULOGNE  SUR  MER  (France).  Or,  on  an  inescutcheon  gules,  between  three 
torteaux,  a  cock  argent. 

BOURNEMOUTH  (Hants).  Quarterly  or  and  azure,  a  cross  flory  between  a  lion 
rampant,  holding  between  the  paws  a  rose  in  the  first  and  fourth  quarters,  six 
marlets,  two,  two  and  two  in  the  second,  and  four  salmons  naiant  and  in  pale  in 
the  third,  all  counterchanged.  Crest — Upon  a  mount  vert  a  pine  tree  proper,  in 
front  four  roses  fessewise  or.     Motto — "  Pulchritudo  et  salubritas." 

[Granted  by  Sir  Albert  William  Woods,  Knt,  Garter  Principal  King  of  Arms, 
Walter  Aston  Blount,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms,  George  E.  Cokayne,  Norroy 
King  of  Arms,  24th  March  1891.] 

BOW-STRING  MAKERS.     Refer  to  Long  Bow-String  Makers. 


96 


BOSTON 


BOULOGNE 


BOURNEMOUTH 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BOWYERS,  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).     Sable,  on  a  chevron  or,  between 
three  floats  argent,  as  many  mullets  pierced  of  the  first.     Crest — On  a  wreath  or 
and  azure,  three  long-bows  interlaced  one  erect  and  two  in  saltire  gules,  stringed 
or.     Motto — "  Crecy,  Poitiers,  Agincourt."     Mantled,  sable,  furred  ermine. 
[Arms  and  crest  granted  by  Holme,  Ciarenceux,  4  Henry  VH.,  1489.] 

BOZEN  (Tyrol,  Austria).     Argent,  on  a  fesse  gules,  a  mullet  of  six  points  or. 

BRABANT,  Province  of  (Belgium).     Sable,  a  lion  rampant  or. 

BRABANT  MERCHANTS.     Refer  to  Flanders  Merchants. 

BRACKLEY  (Northamptonshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  arms  of  Egerton 
and  Stanley  have,  however,  been  appropriated  and  are  borne  quarterly,  namely, 

1  and  4  argent,  a  lion  rampant  gules,  between  three  pheons  sable  (for  Egerton), 

2  and  3,  argent,  on  a  bend  azure,  three  stags'  heads  cabossed  or  (for  Stanley). 
Crests — I.  A  lion  rampant  gules,  supporting  an  arrow  proper,  barbed  and  flighted 
argent  (for  Egerton).  2.  On  a  chapeau  gules,  turned  up  ermine,  an  eagle  with 
wings  endorsed  or,  standing  on  a  child  proper,  swaddled  gules  banded  argent 
(for  Stanley).  The  arms  are  so  given  in  Burke's  "  General  Armory,"  and  appear 
upon  the  seal,  and  the  seal  is  duly  recorded  in  the  Visitation  Books,  but  with  the 
note  added  thereto — "This  Seal  was  presented  to  the  Corporation  by  John,  Earl 
of  Bridgwater,  Lord  of  the  Manor,  soon  after  the  Restoration."  The  above  arms 
were  of  course  his  own,  but  I  doubt  if  the  entering  of  them  as  upon  the  seal  at 
the  visitation,  particularly  as  the  note  above  quoted  was  added,  conferred  them 
upon  the  Corporation. 

BRADFIELD  COLLEGE.     Uses    a    device,  viz.,   Within  a  circle  inscribed    with 
the  words,  "  Coll.  S.  Andrese.     Bradfield.     Berks,"  a  saltire  gules  entwined  by 
a  scroll,  thereon  the  motto,  "  Benedictus  es,  O  Domine  Doce  me  statuta  tua." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

BRADFORD  (Yorkshire).  Per  pale  gules  and  azure,  on  a  chevron  engrailed 
between  three  bugle-horns  stringed  or,  a  well  sable.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  a  boar's  head  (without  tongue)  erased  or,  in  front  of  the  trunk  of  a  tree 
sprouting  proper,  together  with  the  Motto — "  Labor  omnia  vincit.  Supporters — 
On  the  dexter  side,  a  ram  sable,  horned  or,  and  gorged  with  a  wreath  of  white 
roses  proper;  and  on  the  sinister  side,  an  Angora  goat  argent,  horned  or,  and 
gorged  with  a  collar  gules,  thereon  three  roses  also  argent.  Motto — "  Labor 
omnia  vincit."  Badge — A  ram's  head  caboshed  argent,  horned  and  crowned  with 
a  civic  crown  or. 

[The    arms    and    crest    were    granted    October    18,    1847,    the    supporters 
December  31,  1907,  the  Badge,  January  31,  1908.] 


98 


BRACKLEY 


BOWYERS,  COMPANY  OF 


CITY  OF  BRADFORD 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BRADFORD  GRAMMAR  SCHOOL  (Bradford,  Yorks).     Uses  the  arms  of  the 
City,  and  the  motto,  "  Hoc  age." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

BRANDENBURG,  Province  of  (Prussia).  Argent,  an  eagle  displayed  gules,  on 
the  head  an  electoral  bonnet  proper,  beaked,  legged  and  with  sachsen  or,  the 
dexter  claw  holding  a  sceptre  and  the  sinister  a  sword,  charged  on  the  breast 
with  an  inescutcheon  azure,  thereon  a  sceptre  in  pale  or. 

The  foregoing  arms  appear  to  be  borne  (a)  on  the  breast  of  an  eagle  dis- 
played sable,  crowned,  beaked  and  legged,  and  with  sachsen  or,  holding  in  the 
dexter  claw  a  sceptre  and  in  the  sinister  an  orb  proper ;  or  {b)  surmounted  by 
an  electoral  bonnet  and  supported  by  (dexter)  a  wild  man  wreathed  about  the 
head  and  middle  with  oak-leaves  and  supporting  a  club,  and  (sinister)  a  man  in 
complete  armour,  all  proper ;  or  (c)  without  the  bonnet  but  with  a  crest  out  of  a 
coronet  or,  a  sceptre  in  pale  of  the  same  between  two  eagle's  wings  sable,  charged 
with  sachsen  and  seme  of  linden  leaves  or.  Supporters — As  before,  but  holding  in 
their  exterior  hands  banners — the  dexter  of  Prussia,  the  sinister  of  Brandenburg. 

BRAUNSCHWEIG.     Refer  to  Brunswick. 

BRAZENOSE  COLLEGE,  Oxford.  (Founded  15 15  by  William  Smith,  Bishop 
of  Lincoln.)  The  escotcheon  divided  into  three  parts  paleways  the  centre 
or,  thereon  an  escotcheon  charged  with  the  Arms  of  the  See  of  Lincoln,  ensigned 
with  a  mitre,  all  proper,  the  dexter  side  argent,  a  chevron  sable,  between  three 
roses  gules,  seeded  or,  barbed  vert  (being  the  Arms  of  the  founder,  William 
Smith),  on  the  sinister  side  the  Anns  of  Sir  Richard  Sutton,  of  Presbury, 
Chester,  Knt.,  who  finished  the  College,  viz.,  quarterly :  1  and  4,  argent,  a 
chevron  between  three  bugle-horns  stringed  sable  (Sutton) ;  2  and  3,  argent,  a 
chevron  between  three  crosses  fiory  sable  (Samsbury). 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms  at  the  Visitation  of  the  County  of  Oxford, 
1574.  A  visitation  record  of  arms  is  in  trick  or  colour,  no  verbal  blazon  being 
attached.  The  blazon  above  quoted  is  that  usually  adopted,  but  it  is  hardly 
correct  to  describe  the  escutcheon  as  divided  into  three  parts,  because  the  outer 
divisions  are  wider  than  the  central  one  which  latter  is  the  width  of  a  pale.] 

BRAZIERS'  COMPANY.     Refer  to  Armourers  and  Braziers. 


TOO 


'BRANDENBURG 


BRAZENOSE   COLLEGE (OXFORD) 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BRAZIL,  United  Republic  of.  The  device  now  used  is  a  star  surrounded  by 
golden  rays.  Tiie  five  points  of  the  star  are  fimbriated  throughout  with  gules 
and  or  and  each  ray  of  the  star  is  party  of  vert  and  or,  i.e.  of  the  national  colours. 
The  star  is  charged  with  a  circular  disc  of  azure,  the  disc  being  surrounded  by  a 
gilt  edged  blue  border  containing  twenty  silver  stars  for  the  twenty  provinces. 
Within  this  border,  likewise  on  a  blue  ground  appears  the  constellation  of  the 
Southern  Cross.  Under  the  star  are  placed  a  branch  of  the  cofi'ee-plant  and 
one  of  the  tobacco  plant  arranged  in  orle,  and  over  these  but  behind  the  star  a 
sword  in  pale  proper,  pommel  and  hilt  or,  the  hilt  surmounted  by  a  blue  ribbon 
which  bears  in  gold  letters  the  name  of  the  Confederated  State  and  the  date  of 
its  establishment— viz  :  "  Estados  Unidos  de  Brazil — 15  de  Novembre  de  1889." 
[The  former  Arms  of  Brazil  were  established  by  decree  iSth  September 
1822,  and  were  "a  sphere  upon  a  red  cross  in  a  field  of  gold  within  a  circle  of 
nineteen  stars  in  a  bordure  of  azure,  in  the  lower  part  a  dragon,  symbol  of  the 
House  of  Braganza :  and  in  the  upper  part  a  Royal  Crown.  A  translation  of 
the  decree  in  extension  appears  in  Berry's  "  Encyclopaedia  of  Heraldry,"  vol.  i.] 

BRECHIN  (Forfarshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The  seal 
represents  a  saint  seated  beneath  a  canopy  and  supporting  in  his  lap  with  his 
sinister  hand  a  crucifix,  and  with  the  right  raised  in  the  act  of  benediction. 
Below  is  an  escutcheon  charged  with  the  arms  of  the  Lordship  of  Brechin, 
namely,  Argent,  three  piles  gules.  The  legend  is  "  Sig.  civitatis  de  Brechin." 
This  is  sometimes  quoted  as  a  coat-of-arms,  namely,  azure,  in  the  porch  of  a 
Gothic  church,  its  lower  extremities  terminating  in  the  nombril  point  argent,  a 
saint  sitting  proper,  habited  of  the  field,  in  base  an  escutcheon  of  the  second 
charged  with  three  piles  issuing  from  the  chief  and  meeting  in  the  base  point 
gules. 

BRECHIN,  Lordship  of     Or,  three  piles  in  point  gules. 
[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  1744  and  1867.] 

BRECHIN,  Bishop  of  According  to  Crockford  the  arms  in  use  are  "  Or,  three 
piles  in  point  gules."  These  arms  were  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register  in  1744 
by  Maule  of  Inverkeilour,  and  in  1867  by  Knight-Erskine  of  Pittodrie,  as  part  of 
their  personal  arms,  as  a  quartering  for  the  Lordship  of  Brechin  to  which  the 
Arms  properly  appertain.     Their  use  by  the  Bishop  is  most  improper. 


BRAZIL 


r.,  I  c 


BRECHIN,  LORDSHIP  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BRECKNOCKSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  but  the  following  are  used  and 
appear  on  the  seal  of  the  County  Council,  namely,  quarterly  i  and  4  sable,  a 
fesse  or,  between  two  swords,  that  in  chief  point  upwards,  and  that  in  base  point 
downwards  proper ;  2  and  3  or,  three  eagles  displayed  „„„„.,  [In  an  article  on 
the  County  Council  Seals  in  the  County  and  Local  and  Government  Magazine, 
by  Allan  VVyon,  these  are  termed  rere-mice  (bats)].  Motto — "  Undeb  hedd 
llwyddiant  "  (Unity,  peace,  prosperity). 

BRECKNOCK  or  BRECON,  Borough  of  (Brecknockshire).  Has  no  arms.  But 
T.  Dineley  assigns  arms  in  his  "  Notitia  Cambro-Britannica — a  Voyage  of  North 
and  South  Wales  "  now  known  as  "  The  Beaufort  Progress  "  in  the  year  1684, 
and  blazons  these  arms  "  Diamond,  a  mantle  of  estate  or  robe  ruby,  double 
ermine,  ouched  Topaz  garnished  with  strings  fastened  thereto  fretwayes 
dependent  and  tasselled  of  the  same."  In  other  words  "sable,  a  robe  of  estate 
gules,  lined  ermine  with  strings  tied  and  tasselled  or." 

This  device  is  more  frequently  in  use  as  a  badge  than  as  a  charge  upon  a 
shield.     The  mantle  is  sometimes  represented  azure. 

BREGENZ,  County  of.     Azure,  a  pale  ermine. 

BREMEN  (Germany).  Gules,  a  key  in  bend  wards  upwards  in  chief  argent. 
Mantling — Gules  and  argent.  Crest — Out  of  a  coronet  or,  a  demi-lion  proper 
holding  in  his  paws  a  key  in  pale  wards  upwards  argent.  Supporters — Two  lions 
rampant  regardant  proper. 

BRENTFORD  (Middlesex).     Has  not  yet  obtained  arms. 


X04 


BRECON 


BREGENZ,  COUNTY  OF 


BREMEN 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BRESLAU  (Province  of  Silesia,  Prussia).  Quarterly:  i,  gules,  a  lion  rampant 
argent  (Bohemia)  ;  2,  Silesia  ;  3,  or,  a  W  sable  (Wratislavia) ;  4,  gules,  issuing 
from  a  reversed  coronet  the  bust  of  St  John  the  Evangelist  (supposed  to  have 
been  originally  the  bust  of  St  Dorothea,  and  over  all  the  symbol  of  St  John  the 
Baptist — viz. :  the  head  proper  in  a  charger  argent).  Mantling — Gules  and  argent. 
Crest — Between  two  flags  barry  of  gules  and  argent,  and  issuing  from  a  coronet 
the  bust  of  St  John  the  Evangelist. 
[Granted  1530.] 

BREWERS,  Worshipful  Company  of  London.  (Incorporated  1445.)  Gules,  on  a 
chevron  argent,  between  three  pairs  of  barley  garbs  saltirewise  banded  proper, 
as  many  tuns  sable,  hooped  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  dcmi- 
Moorish  woman  couped  at  the  knees  proper,  her  hair  dishevelled  or,  habited  sable, 
fretty  argent,  her  arms  extended  holding  in  each  hand  three  ears  of  barley  of 
the  second.     Motto — "  In  God  is  all  our  trust." 

[Granted    by    Hawkesley,    Clarenceux,  23rd    July    1468.      Confirmed   and 
augmented  35th,  Henry  VIII.] 

BREWERS'  CORPORATION  OF  DUBLIN.  Per  chevron  azure  and  or,  in  chief 
a  malt-shovel  erect  between  two  garbs  and  in  base  a  tun,  all  counter-changed. 
Crest — A  castle  or.  Stipporters — Dexter,  a  female  figure  representing  "  Harvest "  ; 
sinister,  a  like  figure  representing  "  Plenty,"  both  vested  and  wreathed  about  the 
temples,  the  dexter  holding  in  her  dexter  hand  over  her  shoulder  three  ears  of 
wheat,  and  the  sinister  holding  in  her  exterior  hound  a  cornucopia,  therefrom 
issuing  flowers.     Motto — "  In  God  is  all  our  trust." 

[Granted  by  Richard  Carney,  Ulster,  7th  September  1697.] 

BREWERS  (Exeter).     Used  the  same  arms  as  the  Brewers'  Company  of  London. 
[No  authority.] 

BRICKLAYERS'  COMPANY.     Refer  to  Tylers  and  Bricklayers. 

BRICKLAYERS  AND  PLASTERERS,  Company  of,  of  the  City  of 
Dublin.  Quarterly :  two  Coates,  the  first  is  azure,  a  flower  de  luce  or, 
betweene  a  brick  axe  and  a  mason's  line  in  cheife  and  trowell  in  base  argent,  the 
second  or,  on  a  chevron  gules  betweene  a  hamer  and  trowell  in  cheife  a  brush 
in  base  proper,  a  flower  de  luce  of  the  first  betweene  two  Roses  argent,  the  third 
as  the  second  and  the  fourth  as  the  first.  Crest — A  castle  with  two  towers 
parted  per  pale  gules  and  argent,  out  of  the  first  an  arme  holding  a  brick  axe 
proper,  out  of  the  second  an  arme  holding  a  lathing  hamer,  and  supported  with 
two  Geomitritions  proper,  with  this  motto,  "  Lahore  et  virtute  gloria." 

[Granted  by  Richard  St  George,  Ulster  King  of  Arms,  April  16,  1671.] 


106 


BRESLAU 


BREWERS,  COMPANY  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BRICKLAYERS  AND  TILERS  (Gateshead).  Azure,  a  chevron  or,  in  chief  a 
fleur-de-lis  argent,  between  two  brici<  axes  paleways  of  the  second,  in  base  a  bundle 
of  laths  of  the  same.  Crest — A  dexter  arm  embowed  vested  per  pale  or  and  gules, 
cuffed  argent,  holding  in  the  hand  proper  a  brick-axe  or.  Motto — "  In  God  is  all 
our  trust." 

[Of  no  authority.     Taken  from  Gateshead  Charter,  1671.] 

BRICKMAKERS'  COMPANY  (London).  Refer  to  Bricklayers'  or  Tylers' 
Company. 

BRIDEWELL  HOSPITAL  (London).     Argent,  a  cross  and  in  the  first  quarter 
a  sword  erect  gules,  on  a  chief  azure,  a  rose  argent,  between  two  fleurs-de-lis  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

BRIDGE  OF  ALLAN.     Has  no  arms,  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 

BRIDGNORTH  (Shropshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Two  seals  are  recorded 
in  the  visitation  books  of  the  College  of  Arms,  one  showing  simply  issuing  from 
battlements  an  embattled  gateway  with  portcullis  surmounted  by  three  towers, 
the  centre  one  taller  than  the  others  and  triple-towered,  all  within  the  legend 
"  Sigill.  communitatis  de  Bruges."  The  other  seal  shows  upon  a  mount  (or  this 
may  be  intended  to  represent  waves)  an  embattled  gateway  with  portcullis,  and 
rising  in  the  centre  from  the  battlements  a  tower  pyramidically  domed,  on  the 
dexter  side  of  the  tower  an  escutcheon  of  St  George  and  on  the  sinister  side  an 
escutcheon  of  France  and  England  quarterly  :  all  within  the  legend  "  Sigillum 
officij  ballivor  libertatis  ville  de  bruges."  The  device  upon  this  last  seal,  though 
in  this  case  the  castle  is  plainly  on  a  mount,  is  usually  used  as  the  arms  of  the 
town,  with  the  Motto  "  Fidelitas  urbis  salus  Regis,"  which  of  course  refers  to  the 
part  played  by  the  town  in  the  Civil  Wars.  Burke  and  Berry,  whilst  both  giving 
a  note  saying  that  the  seal  [evidently  referring  to  the  former  of  the  two]  shows 
a  castle  only,  quote  a  coat,  "  Azure,  a  castle  argent,  a  canton  of  the  last."  How 
this  originated  one  is  at  a  loss  to  understand,  and  the  editor  can  answer  from 
considerable  personal  knowledge  of  the  town  that  such  a  coat  is  never  made 
use  of. 

In  the  visitation  books  rather  an  interesting  note  is  added  to  the  drawings 
of  the  seals,  as  follows  : — "  These  arc  the  scales  now  used  by  towne  of  Bruges 
in  the  countie  of  Salop  aunciently  so  called,  but  of  late  times  corruptly  nomi- 
nated Bruge-north  or  Brugge-north,  when  indeed  that  attribute  of  North  ought 
to  be  Morfe,  as  standing  upon  the  side  of  the  forest  of  Morfe  in  the  said 
countie." 


108 


Did 


BRIDEWELL  HOSPITAL 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BRIDGWATER  (Somersetshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  repre- 
sents a  castle  upon  a  bridge,  within  the  legend  "  Sigillum  Maioris  et  ballorum 
burgi  ac  villae  de  Bridgwater." 

Burke,  in  his  "  General  Armory,"  however,  ascribes  arms  to  the  town  as 
follows  : — 

"  Bridgewater,  Town  of,  (Somersetshire). — Gu.  a  castle  with  three  towers 
an,  the  dexter  and  sinister  tower  domed,  the  castle  standing  on  a  bridge  in 
base  over  a  river,  all  ppr.,  on  the  dexter  side  of  the  centre  tower  an  estoile, 
and  on  the  sinister  a  fleur-de-lis,  both  or.  The  Corporation  Seal  is  very  ancient, 
and  represents  a  castle  surmounted  by  two  others  placed  pyramidically  and 
embattled.  The  castle  stands  on  a  bridge  of  Gothic  work,  with  water  under- 
neath ;  on  each  side  of  the  first  castle  a  domed  tower  surmounted  with  a  ball, 
the  grand  entrance  portcullised  at  the  top,  and  against  the  door  a  man's 
head  couped  close  in  chief,  on  the  dexter  side  an  estoile,  on  the  sinister  a 
fleur-de-lis. 

"  Bridgwater,  Town  of  (Somerset). — Ar.  an  arch  of  a  bridge,  extended  and 
triple-towered  gu.  in  base  water  with  three  ships  therein,  all  ppr." 

Debrett  gives  Burke's  first  selection. 

BRIDPORT  (Dorsetshire).     Gules,  a  castle  with  two  towers  argent,  over  each  a 
fleur-de-lis  or,  in  chief  a  lion  passant  guardant,  crowned  of  the  last,  the  base 
barry  wavy  of  eight  of  the  second  and  azure  :  in  the  portway  three.  .  .  . 
Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms. 

BRIGHOUSE  (Yorkshire).  Or,  on  a  pale  sable,  between  in  chief  two  roses  gules, 
barbed  and  seeded  proper,  and  in  base  two  crescents  of  the  second,  a  lion  rampant 
of  the  field.  And  for  the  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  upon  the  battle- 
ments of  a  tower  argent,  charged  with  two  crescents  fessewise  sable,  a  leopard's 
face  of  the  first,  between  two  roses  gules,  barbed,  slipped  and  seeded  proper. 
Motto — "  Lahore  et  prudentia." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  1894.] 

BRIGHTON,  Borough  of  (Sussex).  Argent,  two  dolphins  naiant  sable,  a  bordure 
azure,  charged  with  si.x  martlets  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  two 
dolphins  in  saltire,  heads  downwards,  sable,  between  as  many  branches  of  coral 
gules.     Motto—"  In  Deo  fidemus." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  14th  April  1897.] 


BRIDPORT  (DORSETSHIRE) 


BRIGHTON 


BRIGHOUSE 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BRISBANE,  See  of  (Australia).  Azure,  the  figure  of  our  Saviour  as  the  Good 
Shepherd  proper. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

BRISBANE.     Refer  to  Emmanuel  College. 

BRISTOL  (Gloucestershire).  Gules,  on  the  sinister  side,  a  castle  with  two  towers 
domed  all  argent,  on  each  dome  a  banner  charged  with  the  cross  of  St  George, 
the  castle  on  a  mount  vert,  the  dexter  base  water  proper,  thereon  a  ship  of  three 
masts  or,  sailing  from  a  port  in  the  dexter  tower,  her  fore  and  main  masts  being 
visible  sable,  the  rigging  of  the  last,  and  on  each  a  round  top  of  the  fifth,  on  the 
foremast  a  sail  set,  and  on  the  main-mast  a  sail  furled  of  the  second.  And  for  a 
Crest — Upon  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  two  arms  embowed  and  interlaced  in 
saltire,  issuing  from  clouds,  the  dexter  hand  holding  a  snake  all  proper,  and  the 
sinister  holding  a  pair  of  scales  or.  Supporters — On  either  side,  on  a  mount  vert, 
a  unicorn  sejant  or,  armed,  maned  and  unguled  sable.  Motto — "Virtute  et 
industria." 

Berry  and  Burke  blazon  the  arms,  gules  on  the  sinister  side,  a  castle  with 
two  towers  domed,  on  each  a  pennon  all  argent,  the  castle  on  a  mount  in  the 
sinister  base  vert,  the  dexter  base  barry  wavy  of  six  argent  and  azure,  thereon  a 
ship  with  three  masts,  sailing  from  behind  the  castle  or,  the  fore  and  main  mass 
in  sight  sable  on  each  two  sails  of  the  second.  Crest — On  a  wreath  two  arms 
embowed  and  interlaced  in  saltire  issuing  from  clouds  all  proper,  in  the  dexter 
a  snake  vert,  in  the  sinister  a  pair  of  scales  or  balance,  or.  Suppoi-ters — Two 
unicorns  sejant  or,  on  a  mount  vert,  maned  and  armed  sable.  Motto — "  Virtute 
et  industria." 

But  Berry  gives  a  note  : — "  The  above  blazon  is  taken  from  a  drawing  sent 
by  the  Corporation.  This  drawing  differs  in  the  following  particulars  from  that 
of  the  Arms,  Supporters,  etc.,  of  the  city  of  Bristol  as  entered  in  the  Visitation 
of  the  County  of  Gloucester,  taken  in  1623,  viz. —  In  the  Visitation  Book,  the 
dexter  base  is  water  ppr.,  in  the  tower  near  the  centre  is  a  large  port,  from 
whence  the  ship  is  sailing,  and  on  each  tower  is  a  banner  ar.  charged  with 
Cross  of  St  George  gu." 

Mr  L.  Acland  Taylor,  Librarian  of  the  Bristol  Museum  and  Reference 
Library,  writes  me  (i8th  November  1898) : 

"  I  am  interested  in  tracing  the  earliest  representation  of  the  Bristol  City 
Arms,  and  in  accounting  for  the  various  representations  of  the  same  as  used  in 
this  city.  I  have  had  some  correspondence  on  the  subject  with  the  Heralds' 
College  and  have  obtained  from  this  source  a  sketch  showing  a  ship  coming  out  of 
a  tower  so  similar  to  the  illustration  given  in  your  work,  'The  Book  of  Public 
Arms,'  the  difference  being  but  slight,  and  in  minor  details. 

"  In  addition  to  this  sketch  I  have  a  painting  certified  by  Mr  Ambrose  Lee, 
Bluemantle,  which  is  stated  to  be  taken  from  the  earliest  representation  in  the 
College  records.  This  painting  differs  materially  from  the  sketch  inasmuch  as 
the  ship  is  sailing  from  between  two  towers,  as  it  might  naturally  be  expected  it 

112 


BRISBANE,   SEE  OF 


^O/i., 


:r.  ) 


BRISTOL 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

would  do.  Mr  Lee  in  a  communication  to  me  on  the  subject  suggests  an  ex- 
planation for  the  differences  in  recorded  blazons  by  the  fact  that  the  '  actual 
Grant  does  not  exist,  nor  any  copy  of  the  blazon,  hence  the  exact  terms  of  such 
blazon  cannot  be  known,  and  can  only  be  approximately  deduced  from  the 
various  authentic  representations  of  the  Arms  in  existence.'  Mr  Lee  con- 
tinues : — '  At  the  time  of  the  Heralds'  Visitation  the  City  Authorities  would 
have  produced  their  authority  for  the  use  of  the  Arms,  but  what  form  this 
"  authority  "  or  proof  took,  we  do  not  at  the  present  time  know.  Anyhow  it 
was  sufficient  and  the  arms  were  duly  entered,  probably  from  a  copy  of  the 
original  arms  in  the  possession  of  the  Corporation,  thus  a  copy  of  a  copy  became 
recorded  here,  with  some  slight  variations  reproduced  in  each  subsequent  repro- 
duction.' Mr  Lee  continues  '  from  a  heraldic  point  of  view  any  one  of  the  five 
or  six  representations  of  the  Bristol  Arms  which  occur  in  the  records  here, 
tho'  differing  in  details  are  equally  right,  but  from  an  antiquarian  point  of  view 
the  oldest  representation  (that  in  the  painting  sent)  which  embodies  most  clearly 
the  idea  present  in  each  of  them,  but  more  or  less  obscured  in  the  later  repre- 
sentations, viz.  that  of  a  city  which  is  a  port,  out  of  which  vessels  proceed,  and 
not  (as  in  the  stamp  on  your  letter)  a  castle  with  half  a  ship  seen  on  the  sea 
behind  \t;  for  this  latter  representation  no  authority  exists  here.'" 

BRISTOL,  See  of.     Sable,  three  ducal  crowns  in  pale  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

BRISTOL,  Dean  of.     Sable  [but  ?  azure],  three  open  crowns  in  pale  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

BRISTOL,  University  of.     Refer  to  University  of  Bristol. 

BRISTOL,  Queen  Elizabeth's  Hospital.     Refer  to  Queen  Elizabeth's  Hospital. 


114 


BRISTOL,   SEE  OF 


BRISTOL,  DEAN  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BRISTOL  MERCHANTS  ADVENTURERS,  Society  of.  Barry  wavy  of  eight 
argent  and  azure,  on  a  bend  or,  a  dragon  passant  with  wings  indorsed  and  tail 
extended  vert,  on  achief  gules,  a  lion  passant  guardant  of  the  third,  between  two 
bezants.  Crest — In  a  ducal  coronet  or,  a  main-mast  of  the  last  with  pennon 
flying  argent,  charged  with  a  cross  gules,  on  the  round  top  a  man  in  armour 
proper,  on  his  dexter  arm  a  truncheon,  his  sinister  hand  supporting  a  carved 
shield  of  the  second,  from  the  round  top  six  pike  staves,  three  on  each  side 
issuing  bendways  of  the  first,  the  rigging  from  the  round  top  to  the  coronet  sable. 
Supporters — The  dexter,  a  mermaid  in  the  sea,  all  proper  crined  or,  the  middle  fins 
at  the  joining  of  the  bodies  of  the  last,  holding  in  her  sinister  hand  a  mirror  of  the 
first,  and  supporting  with  her  dexter  hand  an  anchor  of  the  second,  cabled 
proper:  the  sinister  supporter,  a  winged  satyr  proper  standing  on  a  mount  v^rt, 
winged  and  legged  or,  holding  in  his  sinister  hand  a  scythe  the  blade  in  base, 
all  proper.  Motto — Indocilis  pauperiem  pati. 
[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.] 

BRITISH  AMERICAN  LAND  COMPANY.  Argent,  on  a  saltire  azure,  between 
an  oak-tree  eradicated  in  chief,  two  bee-hives  in  fess  and  a  ship  under  sail  in 
base  all  proper,  a  cornucopia  gold,  a  chief  ermine,  thereon  a  lion  passant 
guardant  or,  between  a  thistle  slipped  also  proper  and  a  harp  also  gold.  Crest 
— A  plough  proper  in  front  of  a  garb  or.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  woodman 
habited  proper  holding  in  the  exterior  hand  an  axe  also  proper,  (sinister)  a 
reaper  habited  proper  holding  in  the  exterior  hand  a  sickle  also  proper.  Motto 
— "  Neu  segnes  jaceant  terrse." 

[Heralds'  College,  Gts.  xl.  115,  117.] 

BRITISH  CENTRAL  AFRICA  PROTECTORATE.  No  warrant  has  been 
issued  assigning  arms,  but  the  Admiralty  publish  as  the  device  of  the  Governor 
to  be  placed  upon  the  Union  flag  a  disc  tierced  in  bend  sinister  or,  argent  and 
sable,  over  all  a  tree  proper. 

BRITISH  COLUMBIA,  Province  of  (Dominion  of  Canada).  Argent,  three 
bars  wavy  azure,  issuant  from  the  base  a  demi-sun  in  splendour  proper,  on  a 
chief  the  Union  device  charged  in  the  centre  point  with  an  antique  crown  or. 
Motto — "  Splendor  sine  occasu." 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  31st  March  1906.] 


116 


BRISTOL  MERCHANTS  ADVENTURERS 


BRITISH  COLUMBIA 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BRITISH  EAST  AFRICA.  No  warrant  has  been  issued  assigning  arms,  but  the 
Admiralty  publish  as  the  device  of  the  Governor  to  be  placed  on  the  Union 
Flag  a  white  disc  charged  with  a  lion  rampant  gules. 

BRITISH  GUIANA.  No  warrant  assigning  arms  has  as  yet  been  issued  to  British 
Guiana.  The  device  published  by  the  Admiralty  is  a  ship  on  the  sea  in  full  sail, 
with  the  motto  "  Damns  petimusque  vicissim." 

BRITISH  HONDURAS.  Per  chevron  and  in  chief  per  pale  argent,  or  and  azure, 
in  the  dexter  chief  a  squaring  axe  in  bend  sinister  surmounted  by  a  paddle  in 
bend ;  on  the  sinister  chief  a  beating  axe  in  bend  surmounted  by  a  saw  in  bend 
sinister ;  and  in  base  on  waves  of  the  sea  a  ship  in  full  sail  all  proper,  and  a 
canton  of  the  Union  device.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  mahogany 
tree  proper.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  negro  proper,  breeches  argent,  holding  over 
his  shoulder  in  his  dexter  hand  a  beating  axe  as  in  the  arms,  (sinister)  a  like 
negro  holding  over  his  shoulder  in  his  sinister  hand  a  paddle  as  in  the  arms. 
Motto — "  Sub  umbra  floreo." 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  2Sth  January  1907.] 

BRITISH  NEW  GUINEA.  No  warrant  assigning  arms  has  as  yet  been  issued 
to-  British  New  Guinea. 

BRITISH  NORTH  BORNEO  COMPANY.  Azure,  in  base  on  waves  of  the  sea 
a  native  boat  of  North  Borneo  with  sails  manned  and  oars  in  action  proper,  a 
chief  or,  thereon  a  lion  passant  guardant  gules.  Crest — Upon  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  two  arms  embowed,  that  on  the  dexter  side  being  an  arm  of  a  native  of 
North  Borneo  proper,  that  on  the  sinister  being  an  arm  vested  azure,  cuffed 
argent,  the  hands  grasping  a  staff  proper  thereon  hoisted  a  flag  flowing  to  the 
sinister  or,  charged  with  a  lion  guardant  gules.  Supporters — On  either  side  a 
Dyak  of  North  Borneo,  that  on  the  dexter  supporting  with  his  exterior  hand 
a  native  shield  and  that  on  the  sinister  supporting  in  his  exterior  hand  a  native 
sword  point  downwards  all  proper.     Motto — "  Pergo  et  perago." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  20th  and  21st  July  1882.  The  Governor  of 
Sabah  (British  North  Borneo  Company)  flies  a  yellow  flag  with  an  orange  border 
charged  with  a  lion  rampant  gules.] 


118 


BRITISH  HONDURAS 


BRITISH  NORTH  BORNEO  COMPANY 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BRITISH  SOUTH  AFRICA  COMPANY.  Gules,  per  fesse  bezanty  and  semee  of 
ears  of  wheat  or,  on  a  fesse  wavy  argent  between  two  bulls  statant  in  chief  and 
an  elephant  in  base  all  proper  three  lymphads  with  oars  sable.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  a  lion  passant  guardant  or,  supporting  with  the  dexter 
fore  paw  an  elephant's  tusk  erect  proper.  Supporters — On  either  side  a  spring- 
bok proper. 

[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.] 

BRITISH  WEST  AFRICA.  Refer  to  Gambia,  Gold  Coast  Colony,  Sierra  Leone, 
Lagos,  Northern  Nigeria. 

BRIXEN,  Principality  of     Gules,  a  paschal  lamb  proper,  the  diadem  or. 


BRITISH  SOUTH  AFRICA  COMPANY 


BRIXEN 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BRODERERS,  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  25th  October 
1 561).  Paly  of  six  argent  and  azure,  on  a  fesse  gules  between  three  lions  of 
England  passant  guardant  or,  two  broches  saltirewise  between  as  many 
trundles  {i.e.  quills  of  gold  thread)  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours  the  Holy 
Dove  displayed  argent,  radiated  or.  Supporters — Two  lions  or,  guttc  de  sang. 
Motto—"  Omnia  De  super." 

[Granted  17th  August  155S.     Grant  printed  "  Misc.  Gen.  et  Her.,"  i.  1S3.] 

BRODERERS.     Refer  to  Embroiderers. 

BROMLEY,  Borough  of  (Kent).  Quarterly  gules  and  azure,  on  a  fesse  wavy 
argent,  three  ravens  volant  proper,  between  in  the  first  quarter  two  branches  of 
broom  slipped  of  the  third,  in  the  second  a  sun  in  splendour,  in  the  third  an 
escallop  shell  or,  and  in  the  fourth  a  horse  forcene  also  argent.  Crest — On  a  wreath 
of  the  colours,  upon  two  bars  wavy  azure  and  a  gent,  an  escallop  shell  as  in  the 
arms,  between  two  branches  of  broom  proper.  Motto — "  Dum  cresco  spero." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  igth  April  1904.] 

BROMSGROVE  SCHOOL.  Argent,  two  chevronels,  between  six  martlets  gules, 
an  inescutcheon  of  Ulster.     Motto — "  Deo  vicino  rege." 

[Of  no  authority,  being  the  arms  of  Sir  Thomas  Cookes,  Bart.,  the  founder.] 

BROUGHTY  FERRY  (Co.  Forfar).     Has  no  arms,  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 


BRODERERS,  COMPANY  OF 


BROMSGROVE  SCHOOL 


BROMLEY 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BROWN-BAKERS  COMPANY  (London).  (Incorporated  9th  June  1621.)  Vert, 
a  chevron  quarterly  or  and  gules,  between  three  garbs  gold,  on  a  chief  barry 
wavy  of  six  argent  and  azure,  an  anchor  lying  fesseways  or,  the  beam  and  ring 
to  the  sinister,  from  the  bottom  of  the  chief  a  hand  issuing  from  clouds  all 
proper  holding  a  pair  of  scales  which  are  on  the  chevron  or.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  an  arm  embowed  vested  quarterly  or  and  gules,  cuff 
argent,  holding  erect  in  the  hand  proper  a  garb  gold. 
[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.] 

BRUGES  (Belgium).  Barry  of  eight  argent  and  gules,  a  lion  rampant  azure, 
crowned  and  collared  or. 

BRUNSWICK  (Germany).  Argent,  a  battlemented  wall  issuing  in  base,  above 
the  battlements  within  an  open  gateway  issuing  therefrom  all  proper,  a  lion 
rampant  gules. 

BRUNSWICK,  Duchy  of  Quarterly:  i  or,  semeof  hearts  gules,  a  lion  rampant  azure 
(Luneberg),  2  gules,  two  lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  or  (Brunswick),  3  azure, 
a  lion  rampant  argent,  crowned  gules  (Everstein),  4  gules,  a  lion  rampant  or 
within  a  bordure  compony  argent  and  azure  (Homburg),  5  or,  a  lion  rampant 
gules,  crowned  azure,  6  gules,  three  bars  and  in  chief  a  lion  passant  or,  7  per  fess 
in  chief  or,  two  bears'  paws  sable  (Hoya),  in  base  per  fesse  in  chief  barry  of  four 
gules  and  argent  (New  Bruchhausen),  the  base  gyronny  of  eight  argent  and 
azure  (Old  Bruchhausen),  8  azure,  an  eagle  displayed  argent,  armed  gules, 
(Diepholz),  9  barry  of  four  argent  and  gules,  a  pale  counter-changed  (Hohnstein), 
10  argent,  a  stag's  attire  gules  (Reinstein),  11  argent,  a  stag  trippant  sable 
(Klestenberg),  12  argent,  a  stag's  attire  sable  (Blankenburg).  Supporters — Two 
savages,  each  supporting  a  club  and  wreathed  about  the  head  and  middle  with 
leaves.     Motto — "  Nee  aspera  terrent." 


134 


BRUGES 


BRUNSWICK 


BRUNSWICK,  DUCHY  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BRUSSELS  (Belgium).  Gules,  St  Michael  or,  overthrowing  the  devil  sable. 
Upon  the  escutcheon  is  placed  a  coronet  of  pearls  and  behind  the  shield  which 
is  supported  by  two  lions  or,  standing  on  a  natural  compartment  vert,  two  lances 
in  saltire  or,  on  each  a  flag  fringed  of  the  last,  the  dexter  charged  with  the  arms 
of  Brabant  (sable  a  lion  rampant  or)  and  the  sinister  with  the  same  arms  of 
Brussels. 

BUCCLEUCH,  Duke  of.     Refer  to  Granton,  Port  and  Harbour  of. 

BUCHAREST  (Roumania).    Tierced  in  fess  azure,  or  and  gules,  on  a  mount  in  base 

vert  a  representation  of  St habited  proper,  holding  over  his  dexter  shoulder 

a  cross  or,  and  supporting  with  his  sinister  hand  a  javelin  also  proper,  headed 
argent.     Motto — "  Patria  sidreptul  men." 

BUCKHAVEN.     Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 

BUCKIE  (Banffshire).     Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  But  upon  a  coloured  sheet 
of  the  armorial  bearings  of  the  Counties  of  England  and  Wales  it  is  credited 
with  something  or  other  suggested  by  the  arms  of  the  town  of  Buckingham, 
which  appear  to  be  generally  used,  and  to  which  refer. 

BUCKINGHAM  (Buckinghamshire).  Party  per  pale  sable  and  gules,  a  swan  with 
wings  expanded  and  inverted  argent,  ducally  gorged  or. 

The  swan  is  almost  universally  quoted  as  chained,  but  it  does  not  so  appear 
in  the  visitation  books,  though  Vincent  gives  it  with  the  chain.  Moreover,  the 
colours  are  usually  quoted  gules  and  sable,  and  the  swan  is  shown  with  the  wings 
endorsed. 


126 


BRUSSELS 


BUCKINGHAM 


BUCHAREST 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BUDA-PEST  (Hungary).  Gules,  a  fesse  wavy  argent  between  towers  with  a  domed 
turret  in  chief  and  a  castle  triple-towered,  each  tower  domed,  in  base  or. 

BULGARIA.  Azure,  on  a  bend  gules,  bordered  and  cotised  argent,  a  wolf  passant 
gules. 

[These   are   the   arms  of  Bulgaria,  as  formerly   borne   by  Austria.     As   an 
independent  State  different  arms  have  been  adopted.] 

BULGARIA,  Kingdom  of.  Gules,  a  lion  rampant  crowned  or.  Supporters — On 
either  side  a  lion  rampant  guardant  queue-fourchcje  supporting  a  tilting-spear  or, 
and  flying  therefrom  to  the  exterior  a  banner  tierced  in  fess  argent,  vert  and 
gules. 

BUNBURY,  See  of.  Argent,  two  swords  in  saltire  proper,  points  upwards,  a  chief 
per  pale  azure  and  gules,  on  the  dexter  side  four  stars,  on  the  sinister  a  three- 
masted  ship. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

BURFORD  (Oxfordshire).  A  drawing  appears  in  the  visitation  books  at  the 
College  of  Arms  of  a  lion  rampant  guardant,  but  it  is  difficult  to  say  whether  it 
be  a  seal  or  a  coat-of-arms.     It  has  no  tinctures,  but  likewise  no  legend. 

BURGHEAD.     Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 


128 


BUDA-PEST 


BUNBURY,  SEE  OF 


BULGARIA 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS     . 

BURMA.     No  warrant  assigning  arms  has  as  yet  been  issued  to  Burma,  but  the 
following  arms  are  in  general  use  : — "  Or,  a  peacock  in  his  pride  proper." 
[They  are  quite  unauthorised.] 

BURNLEY  (Lancashire).  Or,  a  chevron  engrailed  gules,  between  in  chief  two  fusils 
and  in  base  a  lion  rampant  sable,  a  chief  wavy  of  the  last,  thereon  a  dexter  hand 
erect  couped  at  the  wrist  argent,  between  two  bees  volant  of  the  first.  Crest 
— On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  upon  a  mount  vert,  a  stork  argent,  beaked  and 
membered  gules,  holding  in  the  dexter  foot  a  stone,  and  in  the  beak  a  cotton- 
flower  slipped  both  proper.  Motto — "  Pretiumque  et  causa  laboris." 
[Granted  1862.] 

BURNLEY,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

BURNTISLAND  (Fifeshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  arms.  The  seal  at 
present  in  use  represents  a  three-masted  ship  with  sails  furled  upon  waves  of  the 
sea.  The  legend  is  "  Sigillum  burgi  de  Burntisland."  This  is  sometimes  quoted 
as  a  coat-of-arms,  with  the  field  azure  and  the  ship  argent.  Another  seal 
represents  a  fish  within  the  legend  "  Success  to  the  Herring  Fishing." 

BURSLEM  (Staffordshire).  Quarterly  or  and  gules,  a  cross  parted  and  fretty 
counterchanged  between  a  Portland  vase  proper  in  the  first  and  fourth  quarters, 
a  scythe  the  handle  of  the  first,  the  blade  proper  in  the  second,  and  a  fret  couped 
argent  in  the  third.  And  for  a  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours  in  front  of  a 
garb  or,  a  fleur-de-lis  gules  between  two  branches  of  laurel  in  orle  proper.  Motto 
— "  Ready." 

[Granted  by  Sir  Albert  William  Woods,  Knt.,  Garter  Principal  King  of 
Arms,  Robert  Laurie,  Esquire,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms,  Walter  Ashton 
Blount,  Norroy  King  of  Arms,  8th  October  1878.] 


13° 


BURMA 


BURNLEY 


BURSLEM 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BURTON-ON-TRENT  (Staffordshire).  Has  no  arms.  Those  claimed  for  the 
town  and  given  in  Burke's  "General  Armory"  and  in  Debrett's  "House  of 
Commons  "  are  "  Barry  wavy  of  six  argent  and  azure,  on  a  chief  gules  an  eagle 
displayed  between  two  fleurs-de-lis  or."  Upon  the  Corporation  notepaper  a 
motto  is  added,  namely,  "  Honor  alit  artes,"  but  the  arms  are  there  engraved 
"  Azure  three  bars  wavy  argent,  on  a  chief  gules,  etc.,  etc."  This  of  course  is 
colour  upon  colour  and  a  breach  of  heraldic  law.  The  escutcheon  is  also 
surmounted  by  a  mural  coronet,  borne  after  the  manner  of  a  coronet  of  rank. 
This  is  a  piece  of  absurdity  which  cannot  be  too  highly  deprecated.  In  some 
MS.  collections  in  the  College  of  Arms,  which,  not  being  Records,  are  not 
considered  authoritative,  a  coat  is  given  for  Burton,  namely,  "  Barry  wavy  of 
eight  argent  and  azure,  on  a  chief  gules  a  peacock  in  his  pride  proper,  between 
two  fleurs-de-lys  or,"  but  this,  which  is  almost  identical  with  the  coat  of 
Newark,  has  never  been  officially  recognised  as  of  any  authority.  The  Town- 
Clerk,  writing  to  the  editor,  adds,  "  The  Seal  docs  not  represent  the  arms  of  the 
Borough,  as  the  Town  Council  did  not  care  to  go  to  the  expense  of  taking  them 
out."  Apparently  Burton  does  not  rise  to  the  occasion.  Can't  somebody  get 
up  a  subscription  ? 

BURY  (Lancashire).  Quarterly  argent  and  azure,  a  cross  party  and  fretty  counter- 
changed  between  an  anvil  sable  in  the  first  quarter,  a  fleece  or  in  the  second,  two 
shuttles  in  saltire  threads  pendant  proper  in  the  third,  and  three  culms  of  tlie 
papyrus  plant  issuing  from  a  mount  also  proper  in  the  fourth.  Crest — Upon  a 
mount  a  bee  volant,  between  two  flowers  of  the  cotton-tree  slipped  all  proper 
Motto — "  Vincit  omnia  industria." 

[Granted  by  Sir  Albert  William  Woods,  Knt.,  Garter  Principal  King  of  .\rms, 
Robert  Laurie,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms,  Walter  Aston  Blount,  Norroy  King  of 
Arms,  28th  February  1877.] 

BURY,  Accountants'  Institute  of.  Arms  are  given  for  this  Society  in  Burke's 
"  General  Armory."  This  is  presumably  an  error,  as  the  arms  quoted  are  those 
of  the  town  of  Bury. 

BURY-ST-EDMUNDS  (Suffolk).  Azure,  three  pairs  of  arrows  in  saltire  or,  each 
pair  enfiled  with  a  ducal  coronet  of  the  last.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours 
a  wolf  sejant  proper,  and  resting  upon  the  wreath  between  its  paws  tlie  head  of 
a  man,  couped  at  the  neck  of  the  last,  ducally  crowned  or.  Recorded  in  the 
College  of  Arms.  [Grant  dated  29th  Nov.  1609.  See  Catalogue  of  Heraldic 
Exhibition,  71.]  Motto — "  Sacrarium  regis  cunabula  legis."  The  seal  simply 
shows  the  crest,  but  the  wolf  is  there  placed  in  a  peculiar  position,  neither  sejant 
nor  couchant,  and  holding  the  head  in  the  de.xter  forepaw  apparent!)'  b)'  the 
hair. 


BURTON-ON-TRENT 


BURY-ST-EDMUNDS 


BURY  (LANCASHIRE) 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

BUTCHERS,  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  1 6th  September 
1605.)  Azure,  two  pole-axes  in  saltire  or  blades  inwards  argent,  between  two 
bull's  heads  couped  in  fesse  of  the  last,  on  a  chief  argent,  a  boar's  head  couped 
gules  between  two  block  brushes  {i.e.  bunches  of  holly)  vert.  C7rst — On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  a  winged  bull  argent,  the  horns,  tip  of  the  tail  and 
wings  addorsed  or,  and  about  the  head  a  nimbus  proper.  Supporters — On 
either  side  a  winged  bull  argent,  winged,  armed  and  unguled  or,  and  over  each 
head  a  nimbus  proper.  Motto — "  Omnia  subjecisti  sub  pedibus,  oves  et  boves." 
[The  arms  and  crest  were  granted,  College  of  Arms,  7th  February  1540. 
There  is,  however,  no  authority  for  the  supporters.] 

BUTCHERS,  Incorporation  of  (Aberdeen).  Gules,  three  fleshers'  knives  fessways 
in  pale,  and  on  the  dexter  side  an  axe  paleways,  edge  towards  the  sinister, 
all  the  blades  proper,  and  hafted  argent,  in  the  middle  chief  a  tower  triple- 
towered  of  Aberdeen.    Motto — "  Virtute  vivo. 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  isth  May  1682.] 

BUTCHERS,  CORPORATION  OF  (Dublin).  Gules,  two  axes  in  saltire  argent 
between  in  chief  a  bull's  head  couped  or,  in  base  a  garb  of  the  last  and  in  the 
flanks  two  boars'  heads  couped  close  argent,  in  the  centre  fesse  point,  on  an 
escutcheon  or,  a  portcullis  sable.  Crest — A  cubit  arm  vested  argent,  the  hand 
proper  holding  an  axe  or.  Supporters — Two  bulls  or.  Jllotto — "  Vita;  mors  nobis." 
[Granted  by  Carney,  Ulster  King  of  Arms,  1657.] 

BUTCHERS    (Exeter).     Used   the   same    Arms,  Motto   and    Supporters   as    the 
Butchers'  Company,  London. 
[No  authority.] 

BUTCHERS.     Refer  to  Fleshers. 

BUTESHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  which  have  been  invented  and 
are  used  b)'  the  county  are  very  similar  to  the  arms  used  by  the  town  of 
Rothesay,  and  are  party  per  pale,  the  dexter  side  party  per  fesse  gules  and 
argent  in  chief  three  cinquefoils  two  and  one,  and  in  base  a  lymphad  ;  the  sinister 
side  or,  a  fesse  chequy  azure  and  argent. 

CAICOS  ISLANDS.     Refer  to  Turk's  and  Caicos  Islands. 

CAITHNESS.     Azure,  a  ship  under  sail  or. 

[This  coat  is  borne  for  Caithness  by  the  Earls  of  Caithness  and  some  other 
members  of  the  Sinclair  familj-.] 


134 


BUTCHERS,   COMPANY  OF 


U  B  L  I  C   ) 

bra\:> 


i/r,r.Ar.'-y 


CAITHNESS 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CAITHNESS,  County  of.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  County 
Council  exhibits  the  crest  (a  cock  proper)  and  the  Motto  ("Commit  thy  work  to 
God  ")  of  the  Earl  of  Caithness.  The  arms  of  the  old  Earldom  of  Caithness, 
which  form  a  part  of  Lord  Caithness's  achievement,  are  "  Azure  a  ship  under 
sail  or." 

CAITHNESS,  See  of  Azure,  a  crown  of  thorns  or,  between  three  crosses  of  St 
Andrew  couped  proper. 

[Even  Woodward   stigmatises    this  coat  as  a  modern  assumption,  and  he 
seldom  so  criticises,  so  that  it  must  be  very  spurious.] 

CAITHNESS.     Refer  to  Moray,  Ross  and  Caithness,  Bishop  of 

CAIUS  COLLEGE.     See  Gonville  and  Caius  College. 

CALABRIA,  Duchy  of.     Sable,  a  cross  argent  (or,  "  argent,  a  cross  potent  sable  "  ). 

CALAIS  (France).     Per  pale  (dexter)  sable,  on  a  cross  between  four  keys  or,  wards 
upwards  and  to  the  dexter,  a  fleur-de-lis  gules  ;  impaling  (sinister)  barry  wavy 
argent  and  sable,  a  lion  rampant  or. 
[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.] 

CALCUTTA,  City  of.  Per  chevron  or  and  sable,  a  lion  passant  guardant  gules 
between  two  palm-trees  eradicated  in  chief  vert,  and  a  ship  under  sail  in  base 
argent.  Crest — Issuant  out  of  an  Eastern  Crown,  a  sea-lion  holding  in  the 
dexter  paw  a  lotus-flower  leaved  and  slipped  proper.  Supporters — On  either 
side  a  representation  of  an  adjutant  bird  holding  in  the  beak  a  serpent  proper, 
charged  on  the  shoulder  with  an  Eastern  Crown  or.  Motto — "  Per  ardua  stabilis 
esto." 

[Granted  by  two  patents,  both  dated  26th  December  1S96.] 


136 


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CALAIS 


CALCUTTA 


THE   BOOK   OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CALCUTTA,  See  of.     Per  fesse  indented  ermine  and  gules,  a  crosier  in  bend  or, 
headed  argent  surmounted  of  an  open  book  proper  in  base,  two  palm  branches 
in  saltire  vert,  surmounted  of  a  mitre  gold  in  chief. 
[Granted  1814,  College  of  Arms,  Gts.  28,  204.] 

CALEDONIA,  "The  Colony  intended  to  be  established  in  America  by  the 
Indian  and  African  Company  of  this  Kingdom."  Azure,  on  a  saltire  argent, 
between  a  ship  under  sail  flagged  of  Scotland  in  chief  proper,  a  Peruvian 
sheep  in  base,  a  camel  on  the  dexter  and  an  elephant  on  the  sinister  (proper), 
the  first  two  of  these  loaded,  the  last  bearing  a  turret  argent,  over  all  an 
escutcheon  gules,  charged  with  a  thistle-head  crowned  or,  the  shield  being 
adorned  and  surrounded  with  two  thistles  issuing  disposed  in  orle  and  crossing 
each  other  at  foot  and  top,  with  this  motto  in  an  escroll  above — "  Materna 
muniunt  arma." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  15th  April  1698.] 

CALEDONIA,  See  of,  Canada.     Azure,  a  saltire  argent,  surmounted  by  a  pastoral 
staff  or,  over  all  in  the  fess  point  an  open  book  proper  ;  on  a  chief  barry  wavy 
of  the  first  and  second  a  salmon  naiant  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

CALGARY,  See  of,  Canada.     Argent,  a  cross  gules  between  four  beavers  proper, 
on  a  chief  wavy  azure,  a  key  in  bend  and  a  crosier  in  bend  sinister  saltireways, 
surmounted  by  an  open  book  all  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

CALLANDER.  Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic.  Motto —  "  Benledi  saw 
the  cross  of  fire." 

CALNE  (or  Cawne,  Wiltshire).  (Sable),  a  tower  towered  and  domed  (argent) 
between  two  feathers  (of  the  last)  each  feather  in  an  escrol  (or),  and  a  like  feather 
in  the  gateway  of  the  tower. 

Recorded  at  the  Visitation,  but  the  entry  in  the  books  thereof  at  the  College 
shows  no  tinctures. 


13S 


CALCUTTA,   SEE  OF 


CALEDONIA,  SEE  OF 


CALNE 


CALGARY,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CAMBERWELL,  Borough  of  (London).  Quarterly  gules  and  argent,  a  cross 
quarterly  between  a  well  in  the  first  and  fourth  quarters,  a  chevron  couped  between 
three  cinquefoils  in  the  second  and  a  lion  rampant  in  the  third  all  counter-changed. 
Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  in  front  of  a  crosier  erect  gules,  a  hind 
lodged  argent,  guttee-de-sang  and  pierced  through  the  neck  with  an  arrow 
fessewise  sable.     Motto—''  All's  well." 

[Granted  7th  May  igoi.] 

The  second  quarter  is,  of  course,  taken  from  the  arms  used  by  Duhvich 
School,  in  reality  those  of  John  Alleyne,  its  founder. 

CAMBRIDGESHIRE  COUNTY  COUNCIL.  Azure,  a  bend  wavy  and  a  double 
tressure  flory  counterflory,  both  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  castle 
charged  with  an  open  helmet,  both  proper.  Supporters— On  either  side  a  great 
bustard  proper. 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  17th  June  1914.] 

CAMBRIDGE  (Cambridgeshire).  Gules,  a  bridge  throughout  fesseways  surmounted 
by  three  towers,  in  chief  a  fleur-de-lis  or,  between  two  roses  argent,  the  base 
barry  wavy  argent  and  azure,  thereon  three  ships  each  with  one  mast  and 
yardarm  and  sail  furled  sable.  Crest — On  a  mount  vert,  a  bridge  (?)  argent. 
Supporters — On  either  side  a  sea-horse,  the  upper  part  gules,  the  lower  part 
proper  finned  or. 

In  the  Visitation  of  the  Country  in  the  year  16S4  it  is  stated  that 
the  arms,  crest,  and  supporters  were  granted  by  Robert  Cooke,  Clarenceux 
King  of  Arms,  June  7,  1575.  The  record  retained  in  the  College  of  Arms  of 
the  said  grant  starts  "  A  creast  with  Supporters  confirmed  to  the  auncient  armes 
of  the  Towne  &  broughe  of  Cambridge,"  blazons  the  achievement  as  follows, 
"  Gules  a  bridge  in  chief  a  flower  de  luce  gold  between  two  roses  silver  on  a 
poynt  wave  three  botes  sables  the  creast  on  a  mounte  verte  a  bridge  silver.  The 
Supporters  two  neptunes  horses,  the  upper  part  gules,  the  nether  part  proper 
fyned  gold." 

The  drawing  of  the  Crest,  of  which  the  illustration  is  an  exact  representation, 
is  not  very  like  a  bridge.  Burke  in  his  "General  Armory"  makes  several 
mistakes  in  blazoning  the  arms. 

CAMBRIDGE,  University  of.     See  University  of  Cambridge. 

CAMBRIDGE  UNIVERSITY.  Refer  to  the  University  of  Cambridge,  and  to  the 
several  colleges,  viz. : — Ayerst  Hall,  Cavendish,  Christ,  Clare  Hall,  Corpus 
Christi,  Downing,  Emmanuel,  Gonville  and  Caius,  Jesus,  King's,  King's  Hall, 
Magdalen,  Michael  House,  Pembroke  Hall,  Peterhouse,  Queens',  St  Catherine's 
Hall,  St  John's,  Sidney  and  Sussex,  Selwyn,  Trinity,  Trinity  Hall  ;  and  refer 
to  University  Library  and  Regius  Professors  sub  Cambridge. 

140 


CAMBERWELL 


COUNTY  COUNCIL  OF  CAMBRIDGE 


CAMBRIDGE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CAMBRIDGE  UNIVERSITY,  Regius  Professors.  B>'  a  grant  dated  13th 
November  1590,  Robert  Cooke,  Clarenceux,  granted  "  to  the  five  '  readers'  arms 
and  crests  which  the  said  lecturers  and  professors  might  give  and  beare 
lawfully  to  them  and  their  successors  in  like  place  and  office  for  ever."  This 
grant  is  printed  in  extcnso  in  the  Genealogical  Magazine,  July  iSg8,  Voi.  ii., 
p.  125.  The  original  grant,  which  is  still  in  the  possession  of  the  University  of 
Cambridge,  was  exhibited  at  the  Heraldic  Exhibition  in  London  in  i>S94.  The 
arms  granted  were  as  follows  : — 
To  the  Phisicke  Reader  : 

Azure,  a  fesse   ermines,  between  three  lozenges  gold,  on  a   chief  gules,  a 
lyon  guardant  gold  marked  in  his  syde  with  this  letter  M  sable.     Crest—  On  a 
wreath  gold  and  azure,  a  Quinquangle  silver  called  simbolum  sanitatis. 
To  the  Lawe  Reader  : 

Purple,  a  cross  moline  gold,  on  a  chief  gules,  a  lyon  passant  gardant  gold 
marked  on  his  side  with  this  letter  L  sable.     Crest — On  a  wreath  purple  and 
gold  a  bee  volant  gold. 
To  the  Divinity  Reader  : 

Gules,  on  a  cross  ermine,  between  four  doves  silver,  a  book  of  the  first  leaves 
gold  clasped,  vested  in  the  midst  with  this  Greek  letter  Q  (Theta)  sable.     Crest 
— On  a  wreath  silver  and  gules,  a  dove  volant  silver  with  an  olive  branch  vert  in 
his  beak. 
To  the  Hebrew  Reader: 

Silver,  the  Hebrew  letter  n  (Tawe)  sable,  on  a  chief  gules  a  lyon  passant 
guardant  gold  marked  in  his  syde  with  this  letter  H  sable.     Crest — On  a  wreath 
silver  and  sable  a  turtle  dove  azure. 
To  the  Greek  Reader  : 

Party  per  chevron  silver  and  sable,  in  the  first  these  two  Greek  letters 
A  (Alpha)  and  Q,  (Omega)  sable,  and  in  the  second  a  cicade  or  grasshopper  silver, 
on  a  chief  gules,  a  lyon  passant  guardant  gold,  marked  in  his  side  with  this 
letter  G  sable.  Crest — On  a  wreath  silver  and  sable  an  owl  silver,  legs,  beak 
and  ears  gold. 

All  the  helmets  are  said  to  be  manteled  gules,  doubled  silver. 

Refer  to  Philosophy  School. 


142 


CAMB.  UNIV.  PHISICKE  READER 


CAMB.  UNIV.  LAWE  READER 


U  D  L  I  G  ) 


CAMB.   UNIV.  DIVINITY  READER 


CAMB.  UNIV.  HEBREV/  READER 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CAMELFORD  (Cornwall).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Berry  gives,  Argent,  a 
camel  passing  through  a  ford  of  water  all  proper. 

CAMPBELTOWN  (Argyllshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings. 
The  seal  shows  an  escutcheon  quarterly  of  four.  In  the  first  quarter  is  a  tower 
on  a  mount,  the  second  is  gyronny  of  eight  or  and  sable,  in  the  third  quarter  is 
a  lymphad,  and  in  the  fourth  a  fret.  (The  second  and  third  quarter  are 
evidently  taken  from  the  arms  of  Campbell,  Dukes  of  Argyll.)  The  Motto 
surrounding  the  escutcheon  is  "  Ignavis  precibus  fortuna  repugnat,"  and  the 
Legend,  "  Sigillum  comune  burgi  de  Campbeltn." 

CANADA,  Dominion  of.  Consequent  upon  the  formation  of  the  Dominion  of 
Canada  in  1S67  a  Royal  Warrant  was  issued  in  1869  (printed  in  F.  E.  Hulme's 
"  Flags  of  the  World,"  p.  81),  by  which  arms  were  assigned  to  the  four  provinces 
of  Ontario,  Quebec  (previously  called  Upper  Canada  and  Lower  Canada 
respectively),  Nova  Scotia  and  New  Brunswick,  and  authorising  the  four  coats 
to  be  borne  together  quarterly  for  the  Dominion  as  follows : — 

Quarterly:  i.  For  Ontario — Vert,  a  sprig  of  three  leaves  of  maple  slipped 
or,  on  a  chief  argent,  the  cross  of  St  George. 

2.  For  Quebec — Or,  on  a  fesse  gules,  between  two  fleurs-de-lis  azure  in  chief, 
and  a  sprig  of  three  leaves  of  maple  vert  in  base,  a  lion  passant  guardant  or. 

3.  Vox  Nova  Scotia — Or,  on  a  fesse  wavy  azure,  between  three  thistles  proper, 
a  salmon  naiant  argent. 

4.  For  New  Brunswick — Or,  on  waves,  a  lymphad  with  oars  in  action  proper, 
on  a  chief  gules,  a  lion  passant  guardant  or. 

Nothing  official  has  since  been  done  up  to  the  present  time  to  modify  the 
force  of  the  warrant  or  change  its  provisions,  and  the  foregoing  remains  the  legal 
and  official  coat  of  arms  of  the  Dominion.  In  1870  the  Province  of  Manitoba 
was  formed  and  admitted  into  the  Union;  British  Columbia  followed  in  1871, 
and  Prince  Edward  Island  in  1S73,  and  since  then  Alberta  and  Saskatchewan. 
Legitimate  Arms  exist  for  all  the  foregoing  (to  which  refer),  and  from  time  to 
time  unofficial  representations  are  to  be  found  in  which  some  or  all  are  introduced 
into  the  arms  of  the  Dominion  as  additional  quarterings.  This  practice  is  at 
present  unauthorised  and  improper.  I  understand,  however,  that  at  the  moment 
of  writing  the  question  of  the  arms  of  the  Dominion  is  under  consideration, 
though  whether  the  result  will  be  one  single  and  simple  coat  for  the  Dominion 
or  the  inclusion  of  additional  quarterings  remains  to  be  seen. 

No  crest,  supporters  or  motto  were  assigned  to  the  Dominion  in  the  original 
Royal  Warrant,  and  though  crests  and  supporters  are  on  record  for  Ontario  and 
for  Nova  Scotia,  it  would  be  quite  incorrect  to  add  them  to  the  Dominion 
escutcheon. 

The  badge  of  a  maple-leaf  appears  to  be  very  generally  accepted  as  a  floral 
badge  for  Canada,  but  it  has  as  yet  no  official  recognition. 

The  quartered  coat  is  borne  in  the  flag  of  the  Governor-General,  the  shield 

144 


A^n 


CAMELFORD 


CAMB.   UNIV.  GREEK  READER 


CANADA 


CAMPBELTOWN 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

being  placed  in  a  white  disc  in  the  centre  of  the  flag  within  wreaths  which  are 
of  maple-leaves  instead  of  the  oak-leaves  prescribed  for  similar  flags  in  other 
parts  of  the  King's  Dominions  and  ensigned  by  the  Imperial  crown. 

The  Lieutenant-Governors  bear  the  arms  of  their  respective  provinces  upon 
their  flags  within  a  similar  wreath,  but  without  the  crown. 

No  arms  have  been  officially  assigned  to  the  North-West  Territories. 

[Refer  also  to  the  Hudson  Bay  Company.] 

CANADA  COMPANY.  Argent,  on  a  cross  of  St  George  gules,  a  lion  passant 
guardant  or,  in  the  first  quarter  a  beaver,  in  the  second  a  saw  surmounted  by  an 
axe  in  saltire,  in  the  third  a  plough,  and  in  the  fourth  a  garb,  the  whole  proper, 
a  chief  erminois,  thereon  a  rose  gules  charged  with  another  argent,  barbed  and 
seeded  proper  between  a  thistle  on  the  dexter  side  slipped  and  leaved  and  a 
trefoil  on  the  sinister,  both  also  proper.  Crest — On  a' wreath  of  the  colours,  an  oak- 
tree  eradicated  proper.  Supporters — On  either  side  a  lion  guardant  or,  the  dexter 
supporting  a  flag-staff  proper,  flowing  therefrom  a  banner  azure,  charged  with 
the  cross  saltire  of  St  Andrew  argent,  the  sinister  supporting  a  like  flag-staft 
with  a  banner  argent,  charged  with  the  cross  saltire  of  St  Patrick  gules. 
Motto — "  Non  mutat  genus  solum." 

[College  of  Arms,  Gts.  xxxv.  213,  215.] 

CANARY  COMPANY.  (Incorporated  17th  March  1664.)  Argent,  a  cross  gules,  on 
a  chief  azure  a  lion  passant  guardant,  between  two  bunches  of  grapes  stepped 
or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  mountain  as  representing  the  Peak 
of  Teneriffe  proper.  Supporters — Two  falcons  with  wings  endorsed  or,  belled 
of  the  last. 

[Granted  by  Walker,  Garter,.  1665.] 

CANTERBURY   (Kent).      Argent   three   Cornish   choughs   two   and    one   sable, 
beaked  and  legged  gules,  on  a  chief  of  the  last  a  lion  passant  guardant  or. 
Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms. 

CANTERBURY.     Refer  to  King's  School. 

CANTERBURY,  Archbishopric  of.  Azure,  the  cross-staff  of  an  Archbishop  in 
pale  or  surmounted  of  a  pall  proper. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

In  the  case  of  Canterbury  the  pall  is  always  depicted  as  charged  with  four 
crosses  pat^e  fitchee  at  the  foot.  These  arms  first  appear  on  the  seal  of  Archbishop 
Simon  Islip,  1349- 1366. 


146 


CANADA  COMPANY 


CANTERBURY 


UBLi ; ; 


CANTERBURY,  ARCHBISHOPRIC  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CANTERBURY,  Dean  and  Chapter  of.  Two  coats  are  recorded  in  the  College 
of  Arms  : — 

(a)  A  cross  charged  with  a  Roman  figure  X  surmounted  by  the  Roman 
figure  I. 

{l>)  A  cross  engrailed  ermine,  in  the  first  quarter  a  crescent. 

No  colours  are  given  for  either  coat.  The  first  mentioned  is  the  one  always 
used,  the  field  being  made  azure,  the  cross  argent,  and  the  monogram  sable. 

CAPE  BRETON  ISLAND.  Although  this  was  formerly  a  distinct  colony,  no 
warrant  was  ever  issued  assigning  arms  to  it,  and  it  is  now  incorporated  with  the 
Province  of  Nova  Scotia. 

CAPE  COLONY,  or  The  Colony  of  the  Cape  of  Good  Hope.  Gules,  a  lion 
rampant  between  three  annulets  or,  on  a  chief  argent,  as  many  hurts  each 
charged  with  a  fleur-de-lis  of  the  second.  Ct'est — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours, 
the  figure  of  Hope  proper,  vested  azure,  resting  the  dexter  arm  on  a  rock  and 
supporting  with  the  sinister  hand  an  Anchor  sable  entwined  with  a  cable  also 
proper.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  gnu,  (sinister)  an  oryx  [gems  buck],  both 
proper.     Motto — "  Spes  bona." 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  29th  May  1876.  The  warrant  is  printed  in 
extenso.  Genealogical  Magazine,  September  1900,  Vol.  iv.,  p.  185.  Refer  to  South 
Africa.] 

CAPE  OF  GOOD  HOPE,  Province  of  the  (Union  of  South  Africa).     Gules,  a 
female  figure  representing   Hope,   resting  the  dexter   arm   upon   a  rock   and 
supporting  with  the  sinister  hand  an  anchor  argent. 
[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  4th  May  191 1] 


148 


CANTERBURY,  DEAN  OF 


PROVINCE  OF  CAPE  OF  GOOD  HOPE 


CAPE   COLONY 


THE   BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

CAPE  TOWN  (Cape  of  Good  Hope).  Or,  an  anchor  erect  sable,  stock  proper, 
from  the  ring  a  riband  flowing  azure  and  suspended  therefrom  an  escutcheon  gules, 
charged  with  three  annulets  of  the  field.  Cresi— On  a  wreath  of  the  colours, 
upon  the  battlements  of  a  tower  proper,  a  trident  in  bend  dexter  or,  surmounted 
by  an  anchor  and  cable,  in  bend  sinister,  sable.  Supporters — (Dexter)  standing 
on  a  rock  a  Female  Figure  proper,  vested  argent,  mantle  and  sandals  azure, 
on  her  head  an  estoile  radiated  or,  and  supporting  with  her  exterior  hand  an 
anchor  also  proper ;  (sinister)  standing  on  a  like  rock  a  lion  rampant  guardant 
gules.     Motto — "  Spes  bona." 

[The  arms  were  confirmed  and  the  crest  was  granted  by  Sir  Albert  Woods, 
K.C.B.,  K.C.M.G.,  Garter;  G.  E.  Cokayne,  Clarenceux,  and  W.  H.  Weldon, 
Norroy,  and  the  Supporters  were  granted  by  Sir  Albert  Woods,  by  patents  dated 
29th  December  1899. 

On  the  1 2th  June  1S04  the  Commissioner-General  Magister,  J.  A.  de  Mist, 
authorised  the  City  Council  to  make  use  of  a  Town  Seal  or  Arms  as  follows  : — 
"The  arms  of  Capetown  shall  be  an  anchor  of  sable  on  a  field  of  gold,  the 
emblem  of  Good  Hope  covered  by  the  arms  of  the  Founder  of  this  Colony — van 
Riebeeck — which,  according  to  the  drawings  in  acknowledged  and  accredited 
works,  consist  of  three  gold  rings  on  a  red  field  with  the  circumscription  '  Seal 
of  the  Cape.'" 

This  Dutch  grant  is  set  out  in  full  in  the  Patent  of  Grant  and  Confirmation 
of  1899,  ^1*^  *^his  Patent,  together  with  a  facsimile  of  the  Dutch  Grant,  is  printed 
in  extenso  in  the  Genealogical  Magazine,  August  1900,  Vol.  iv.,  p.  156.] 

CAPE  TOWN,  See  of.     Quarterly  azure  and  sable,  in  the  first  and  fourth  a  lion 
rampant  argent,  in  the  second  and  third  three  open  crowns  paleways  or,  over 
all  on  a  cross  of  the  last  an  anchor  of  the  second  in  the  fesse  point  and  in  the 
honour  point  an  escutcheon  of  the  arms  of  Burdett-Coutts. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

CAPE  OF  GOOD  HOPE  UNIVERSITY.  Refer  to  the  University  of  the  Cape 
of  Good  Hope. 


150 


CAPE  TOWN 


CAPE  TOWN,  SEE  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

CARDIFF,  City  of  (Glamorganshire).  Erected  into  a  city  October  28,  1905. 
Argent,  on  a  mount  vert,  a  dragon  rampant  gules,  supporting  in  front  of  a  leek 
issuing  from  the  mount  a  flag-staff  erect  proper,  flowing  therefrom  to  the  sinister 
a  Banner  of  the  third,  charged  with  three  chevronels  of  the  first.  Crest — A 
Tudor  rose  on  three  ostrich  feathers  argent,  issuing  out  of  a  mural  crown  proper. 
Supporters — On  the  dexter  side  a  goat  and  on  the  sinister  side  a  sea-horse,  both 
proper.  Mottoes — (over  crest)  "  Deffro  mae'n  Ddydd,"  (under  arms)  "  Y  ddraig 
goch  ddyry  gychwyn." 

[The  arms  were  granted  by  patent,  August  26,  1906.  The  crest  was 
assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  dated  October  6,  1906,  under  the  hand  of  His 
Majesty  King  Edward  VII.,  the  same  being  exemplified  by  a  subsequent 
patent.  The  supporters  were  granted  by  Sir  Alfred  Scott-Gatty,  Garter  King 
of  Arms,  by  patent  dated  February  25,  1907.  Prior  to  the  elevation  of  Cardiff 
to  the  dignity  of  a  city,  arms,  sometimes  "  gules,  three  chevronels  or, "  sometimes 
with  the  tinctures  reversed,  were  used  as  the  arms  of  Cardiff,  and  were  supposed 
to  be  derived  from  the  arms  of  the  De  Clares.  These  are  perpetuated  in  the  new 
arms,  the  national  emblems  of  the  leek  and  the  red  dragon  being  introduced.  The 
crest  is  derived  from  the  badge  of  the  Prince  of  Wales,  hence  the  necessity  of  the 
Royal  Warrant,  the  Tudor  rose  {i.e.  a  white  rose  within  a  red  rose)  being  taken 
from  the  old  seal  of  the  borough.] 

CARDIGANSHIRE.  Has  no  amorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  County  Council 
represents  a  view  of  the  University  College,  Aberystwith,  with  the  Motto 
"  Goreu  arf,  arf  dysc."  This,  the  editor  is  informed,  is  the  Welsh  for  "  The  best 
weapon  is  the  weapon  of  knowledge,"  another  rendering,  perhaps,  of  the  ancient 
proverb,  "  Knowledge  is  power." 

CARDIGAN  (Cardiganshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  is  described 
in  Burke's  "  General  Armory  "  as  representing  an  antique  castle  triple-towered 
and  embattled,  and  on  the  reverse  a  ship  under  sail.  The  seal  in  use  at  present, 
according  to  an  impression  which  has  been  forwarded  to  me,  is  divided  into  two 
compartments,  that  on  the  dexter  side  having  a  castle  therein,  and  a  ship 
occupying  the  sinister  division.  The  seal  has  the  motto,  "  Anchora  spei  cereticas 
est  in  te  Domine."  The  legend  is  "  Sigillum  commune  burgensium  de  Cardigan." 
But  the  Mayor's  notepaper  represents  an  escutcheon  party  per  pale,  on  the 
dexter  side  a  triangular  castle,  and  on  the  sinister  side  a  ship  at  sea  in  full  sail. 


IS* 


CARDIFF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CARDINALL  COLLEGE,  OXFORD.  Azure,  on  a  cross  engrailed  argent,  a 
lion  passant  gules  between  four  leopards'  faces  of  the  field,  in  the  first  quarter 
a  griffin  passant  supporting  a  column  or,  in  the  second  quarter  an  open  book 
argent,  leathered  gules,  garnished  or,  on  a  chief  of  the  last  a  Cardinal's  hat  of 
the  third,  between  a  torteau  charged  with  two  crosses  in  saltire  of  the  fourth  and 
a  key  of  the  second  encircled  by  a  crown  of  the  fourth,  and  a  hurt  charged  with 
a  lion  rampant  argent,  collared  of  the  fourth,  and  a  saltire  of  the  last. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

CARDMAKERS"  COMPANY.     Refer  to  Makers  of  Playing  Cards. 

CARINTHIA.     Refer  to  Austria. 

CARLINGFORD  (Co.  Louth).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in  Ulster's 
Office.  Those  attributed  to  the  Corporation  in  Lewis's  "  Topographical 
Dictionary "  are  decidedly  unique.  They  represent  a  man  armed  cap-a-pie, 
brandishing  in  his  dexter  hand  a  sword,  and  between  in  chief  an  eagle  rising 
from  a  demi-globe  and  in  base  a  tower,  on  the  dexter  side  are  three  birds,  two 
'     and  one,  and  on  the  sinister  side  a  ship  of  three  masts. 

CARLISLE  (Cumberland).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  Corporation  seal 
represents  a  peculiar  kind  of  cross  couped  (differing  greatly  from  the  form  now 
made  use  of),  closely  resembling  a  cross  potent,  charged  in  the  centre  with  a 
rose,  and  between  four  others.  Burke,  in  his  "  General  Armory,"  quotes  the 
arms — "  Vert  the  base  wavy  of  six  (sic)  ar.  and  az  ,  thereon  a  castle  between 
two  roses  or,  on  a  chief  gu.  a  lion  pass,  guard,  of  the  fourth."  Two  escutcheons 
are  now,  however,  invariably  made  use  of.  The  dexter  one,  the  tinctures  of 
which  are  unknown,  shows  a  cross  pattee  (?)  charged  in  the  centre  with  a  rose 
and  between  four  others.  The  sinister  one  is  "  vert  the  base  barry  wavy  of  six 
argent  and  azure,  and  issuing  therefrom  a  castle  between  two  roses  or,  on  a  chief 
gules  a  lion  passant  guardant  of  the  fourth,"  with  the  motto,  "  Be  just  and 
fear  not." 

CARLISLE,  See  of.     Argent,  on  a  cross  sable,  a  mitre,  labelled  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 
These  arms  date  back  to  about  the  reign  of  Edward  VI. 


'54 


CARLINGFORD 


CARLISLE,  SEE  OF 


CARLISLE 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CARLISLE,  Dean  of.     Argent,  a  cross  sable  (?). 
[Of  no  authority.] 

CARLOW,  County.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

CARLOW,  Town  of  (Co.  Carlow).  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  but  Burke's 
"General  Armory"  quotes  the  following  : — "  Ar.  a  castle  triple-towered  ppr.,  on 
the  centre  tower  a  staff,  thereon  a  flag  per  pale  or  and  vert,  charged  with  a  lion 
rampant  gules." 

CARLSRUHE  (Baden,  Germany).  Or,  on  a  bend  gules,  the  word  "Fidelitas" 
in  letters  of  gold. 

CARMARTHENSHIRE.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

CARMARTHEN  (Carmarthenshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal 
displays  the  following  arms,  Gules,  a  castle  triple-towered,  between  two 
ostrich  feathers  erect  argent,  on  each  of  the  outer  towers  a  Cornish  chough 
respecting  the  centre  tower,  and  in  base  a  lion  passant  guardant  or.  Motto, 
"  Rhydd  did  hedd  a  Llwyddiant."  Sometimes  the  lion  is  depicted  regardant, 
sometimes  couchant,  and  sometimes  in  the  portway  of  the  castle. 

CARMEN'S  COMPANY  (London).  (Made  a  Fellowship  by  Act  of  Common 
Council,  2ist  June  1668.)  Has  no  arms,  but  makes  use  of  the  supposed  arms  of 
the  City  of  London. 

The  Carmen  of  London  were  anciently  incorporated  with  the  Fraternity  of 
Fullers,  under  the  name  of  Woodmongers,  but  for  their  malpractices  they 
thought  it  convenient  in  1668  to  surrender  their  charter  to  avoid  a  greater 
punishment,  and  the  Carmen  were  re-appointed  a  Fellowship.  The  Woodmongers 
Company  [to  which  refer]  used  arms. 


156 


CARLISLE,  DEAN  OF 


CARLO W,  TOWN  OF 


CARLSRUHE 


CARMARTHEN 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
CARNARVONSHIRE.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

CARNARVON  (Carnarvonshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Burke  gives 
"  Three  eagles  displayed  in  fesse,"  and  Debrett  illustrates  arms  as  "  Vert  three 
eagles  displayed  in  fesse  or."  The  arms  are  of  course  those  of  Owen  Gwynedd, 
King  of  North  Wales. 

CARNIOLA.     Refer  to  Austria. 

CARNOUSTIE.  Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic.  Motto — "  Augurium 
favet." 

CAROLINA,  Province  of  (North  America).  .  .  .  two  cornucopia  in  saltire,  mouths 
upwards  .  .  .  Crest — A  buck  trippant  .  .  .  Supporters — (Dexter)  an  Indian 
woman  holding  a  baby  in  her  arms,  and  at  her  side  a  small  Indian  boy  holding 
an  arrow;  (sinister)  an  Indian,  on  his  head  a  crown  of  feathers  and  holding  a 
large  arrow.     Motto — "  Domitus  scultoribus  orbis." 

[There  is  a  docket  of  the  above  arms  in  the  College  of  Arms  with  this  note  : 
"The  Arms,  Crest  and  Supporters  of  the  Province  of  Carolina  drawn  from  the 
Impression  of  the  Great  Seal  of  that  province  fix't  to  the  Patent  granted  to 
Laurence  Cromp,  Esqr.,  late  York  Herald,  to  be  principal  Herald  of  the  said 
Province,  under  the  hands  of  his  Excellency  John,  Lord  Granville,  Palatine,  and 
the  Right  Honble.  the  rest  of  the  True  and  Absolute  Proprietors  of  the  said 
Province,  dated  the  first  day  of  June  Anno  Dni.  1705."] 

CAROLINA,  North,  U.S.A.  (State  Device.)  The  figure  of  Plenty  strewing 
from  an  inverted  cornucopia,  the  fruits  of  the  earth  at  the  feet  of  Liberty,  who 
holds  in  the  right  hand  a  scroll  of  the  constitution,  the  sea  and  ships  in 
perspective. 

CAROLINA,  South,  U.S.A.  (State  Device.)  In  base,  an  oak-tree  eradicated, 
lying  fessewise  in  pale  a  palm-tree,  pendant  therefrom  a  shield,  inscribed 
"July  4,"  and  at  the  foot  two  bundles  of  arrows  in  saltire,  united  by  a  scroll, 
with  the  motto — "  Ouis  separabit  "  :  the  sea  and  mountain  in  perspective. 


158 


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CAROLINA,  PROVINCE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CARPENTARIA,  See  of.  Or,  on  a  chevron  gules,  a  paschal  lamb  proper,  a  bordure 
azure,  bezanty. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

CARPENTERS,  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  -th  July 
1477.)  Argent,  a  chevron  engrailed  between  three  pairs  of  compasses,  their 
points  expanded  towards  the  base  sable.     Motto — "  Honour  God." 

[Granted  by  T.  Hawkeslow,  Clarenceux,  24th  November  1466.  The  grant 
is  printed  in  Jupp's  "  History  of  the  Carpenters'  Company,"  p.  10.] 

CARPENTERS,  JOYNERS,  COOPERS,  WHEELWRIGHTS,  AND 
SAWYERS,  Company  of  (Durham).  The  Banner  of  St  Cuthbert  "with 
arms  appertaining  to  their  trades." 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

CARPENTERS'  COMPANY  (Villefranche).  Azure,  in  chief  a  pair  of  com- 
passes expanded  and  in  base  a  square  both  or. 

CARPENTERS'  COMPANY  (Bayonne,  France).  Sable,  an  axe  bendways 
argent. 

CARPENTERS'  COMPANY  (Angers,  France).  Azure,  in  chief  a  mallet  and 
in  base  an  axe  fesseways  argent. 

CARPENTERS.  Refer  to  Wrights,  and  refer  to  Stornoway,  Incorporated 
Trades  of 

CAR  RAIL.     See  Crail. 

CARRICKFERGUS  (Co.  Antrim).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the 
Port  and  Customs  of  Carrickfergus  shows  an  escutcheon  charged  with  three 
harps,  two  and  one.  But  the  seal  of  the  town  represents  upon  water  a  castle 
triple-towered,  the  port  open,  in  chief  two  birds,  and  on  either  side  of  the  castle 
foliage.  The  legend  is  "  Sigillum  comunede  Cragferg."  The  editor  is  indebted 
to  a  pamphlet  published  by  Mr  John  Vinycomb  for  the  foregoing  information. 

CARRICK-ON-SUIR  (Co.  Tipperary).  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  and  the  seal 
simply  exhibits  the  Legend,  "  Carrick-on-Suir  Town  Commissioners." 

CARRICK-ON-SHANNON  (Co.  Leitrim).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

CASHEL  (Co.  Tipperary).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Burke's  "  General 
Armory,"  quotes,  however,  "  Vert  a  castle  triple-towered  ar.  on  the  centre 
tower  a  double-tongued  pennant  on  a  staff  or." 

CASHEL,  See  of.     Gules,  two  keys  in  saltire,  wards  upwards  or. 

[This  coat,  which  is  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office,  remains  in  use,  but  through 
the  disestablishment  of  the  Irish  Church  it  is  really  extinct,  and  its  present  use 
is  illegal.] 

1 60 


/\  ^ 


CARPENTERS'   COMPANY  (LONDON) 


CARPENTARIA,  SEE  OF 


CASHEL 


CASHEL,   SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CASHEL,    AND    EMLY,    WATERFORD     AND     LISMORE,    Bishop    of. 

According    to    Crockford  only    the    Arms  of    Cashel    are    made    use    of,    but 
Woodward  impales  the  two  coats  of  Cashel  and  Waterford. 

C'ASLAV  (Czaslau,  East  Bohemia).  Gules,  a  battlemented  town-wall  argent, 
the  port  ouvert,  and  rising  from  behind  the  wall  three  battlemented  towers,  and 
issuant  from  each  of  the  exterior  towers  a  watchman  habited  in  azure  with  black 
hat  and  feathers,  blowing  a  horn  or  :  in  the  centre  chief  point  an  inescutcheon 
of  the  arms  of  the  Kingdom  of  Bohemia,  viz.,  gules,  a  lion  rampant  argent. 
[Granted  to  the  town  by  King  Wladislaw  II.,  22nd  May  1472.] 
Since  at  least  1532  the  arms  have  been  surmounted  by  a  mural  crown. 

CASTILE,  Kingdom  of.     Gules,  a  castle  triple-towered  or. 

CASTLE  DOUGLAS  (Kirkcudbright).  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  shows  the 
Douglas  crest  of  the  crowned  heart  between  two  wings  and  the  motto, 
"  Forward." 

CASTLE  MARTYR  (Co.  Cork).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

CASTLEBAR  (Co.  Mayo).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

CASTLE-RISING  (Norfolk).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents 
a  castle  with  three  towers  domed,  on  each  a  pennon,  in  the  centre  over  the  gate- 
way a  latticed  window. 

CASTLETOW^N  (Isle  of  Man).      Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

CATANIA  (Italy).  Argent,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert,  in  front  of  an  elephant 
statant  sable,  the  figure  of  Minerva,  habited,  supporting  with  her  de.xter  hand 
a  lance  erect  and  resting  her  sinister  on  a  shield  all  proper. 

CATHERINE  HALL  (Cambridge).     Gules,  a  Catharine  wheel  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

CATTARO.      Argent,  a  lion  rampant  gules. 

CAVAN,  County.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

CAVAN,  Town  of  (Co.  Cavan).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

CAVENDISH  COLLEGE  (Cambridge).     (Now closed.)     .Sable,  three  stags'heads 
caboshed,  a  bordure  argent. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

CAWNE.     See  Calne. 


162 


C'ASLAV 


CATANIA 


CATHERINE  HALL 


CATTARO 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CENTRAL  AFRICA,  See  of.     Sable,  on  a  cross  argent,  a  roundle  of  the  same 
charged  with  a  monogram  of  the  letters  C.A. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

CEYLON.  Argent,  on  a  mount  vert  between  a  grove  of  eight  cocoanut  trees  and 
mountains  in  perspective  an  elephant  affrontee  all  proper. 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  17th  December  1906.] 

The  Admiralty  publish  for  use  upon  the  Union  Flag  by  the  Governor  of 
Ceylon,  a  device  consisting  of  a  disc  azure,  thereon  on  a  mount  vert,  a  temple, 
and  in  front  thereof,  an  elephant  proper,  the  whole  within  a  circular  band  of  red 
edged  and  ornamented  with  gold. 

CHAMBERLAIN.  Refer  to  Lord  Chamberlain  of  the  Household  in  England, 
Lord  Great  Chamberlain  of  England,  Lord  High  Chamberlain  of  Scotland. 

CHANCELLOR.     Refer  to  Lord  Chancellor  of  England. 

CHANDLERS.     See  Wax  Chandlers. 

CHANNEL  ISLANDS.     Gules,  three  lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  or. 

The  Channel  Islands,  the  sole  remaining  portion  of  the  Dukedom  of 
Normandy  still  appertaining  to  the  English  Crown,  are  not  a  portion  of  the 
United  Kingdom,  of  which  they  are  simply  a  dependency,  and  consequently, 
upon  the  coinage  and  elsewhere,  the  arms  of  Scotland  and  Ireland  are  not 
introduced.  One  instance  has  come  under  the  editor's  notice  in  which  the 
charges  are  distinctly  leopards.  Whether  such  a  practice  is  strictly  legal  is 
certainly  open  to  question.     Refer  to  "  Great  Britain." 

CHARD  (Somerset).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal,  which  is  of  a  pointed 
oval  shape,  represents  two  peacocks  (?)  of  most  wonderful  and  amazing  con- 
struction, one  on  either  side  of  a  central  floriated  ornament  adorned  with  two 
acorns.     The  legend  is  "  Sigillum  burgi  de  Chard,  1570." 

CHARKOW  (Russia).  Argent,  a  horse's  head  couped  sable,  on  a  chief  gules,  a 
mullet  or,  between  two  bezants. 


164 


CEYLON 


CENTRAL  AFRICA,  SEE  OF 


CHARKOW 


CHANNEL  ISLANDS 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CHARLEMONT  (Co.  Armagh).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  device  of  a 
Royal  Crown  within  rays  of  the  sun  is  sometimes  attributed  to  the  town. 

CHARLESTOWN  (Aberlour).  Has  no  arms.  Those  upon  the  seal  are  the 
arms  of  Grant  of  Elchies,  "Gules,  a  boar's  head  between  three  antique  crowns, 
or."  Crest — An  oak-tree,  and  above  the  Motto — "  Craig  a  crochan."  Under  the 
arms,  "  Stand  fast." 

CHARLEVILLE  (Co.  Cork).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  "The  Seal  of  the 
Mayoralty  of  the  Staple  of  Borrough  of  Charleville"  exhibits  an  embattled 
gateway.     This  placed  upon  an  escutcheon  appears  to  do  duty  for  the  town. 

CHARTERED  ACCOUNTANTS.     Refer  to  Accountants. 

CHARTERED  INSTITUTE  OF  SECRETARIES.     Refer  to  Secretaries. 

CHARTER  HOUSE,  or  Sutton's  Hospital.  Or,  on  a  chevron  between  three 
annulets  gules,  as  many  crescents  of  the  first. 

[These  are  the  arms  of  Sutton,  the  founder,  but  there  is  no  official  authority 
for  their  use  by  the  School  or  Hospital.] 

CHARTERHOUSE  SCHOOL.  Or,  on  a  chevron  between  three  annulets  gules 
as  many  crescents  or.     Motto — "  Deo  dante  dedi." 

[Of  no  authority,  being  the  arms  of  Thomas  Sutton,  the  founder.] 

CHATHAM  (Kent).  Argent,  a  fesse  chequy  gules  and  or,  between  in  chief  two  ancient 
ships  with  three  masts  and  sails  proper,  colours  flying  of  the  second,  and  in  base 
a  sword  of  the  fourth,  pommel  and  hilt  of  the  third  surmounted  by  a  trident  in 
saltire  and  entwined  with  a  wreath  of  laurel  also  proper.  Crest — Out  of  a  naval 
crown  or,  a  trident  erect,  enfiled  with  a  wreath  of  laurel  proper.  Motto — "  Loyal 
and  true." 

Granted  August  r,  1891. 

CHEESEMONGERS'  GUILD  (Ghent).  Gules,  above  a  cheese-knife  proper, 
the  handle  or,  a  pair  of  scales  of  the  last,  the  weighing  slabs  argent,  and  in  chief 
two  circular  cheeses  proper. 

CHEKIANG,  See  of.     Refer  to  Mid-China. 


166 


CHARLEMONT 


CHARLESTOWN 


CHARTERHOUSE  SCHOOL 


CHATHAM 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CHELMSFORD  (Essex).  Argent,  a  bridge  of  three  arches  proper,  in  chief  two 
croziers  in  saltire  between  as  many  lions  rampant  azure,  in  base  two  bars  wavy 
of  the  last.  Crest — Upon  a  rock  proper,  a  crozier  in  pale  or,  surmounted  by  two 
swords  in  saltire  points  upwards  proper,  pommels  and  hilts  or,  interlaced  by  a 
wreath  of  oak  vert.  Motto — "  Many  minds  one  heart." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  February  6,  1889.] 

CHELSEA,  Borough  of.  Gules,  within  a  cross  voided  or,  a  crozier  in  pale  of  the 
last,  in  the  first  quarter  a  winged  bull  statant,  in  the  second  a  lion  rampant 
regardant,  both  argent ;  in  the  third  a  sword  point  downwards  proper,  pommel  and 
hilt  gold  between  two  boars'  heads  couped  at  the  neck  of  the  third  ;  and  in  the 
fourth  a  stag's  head  caboshed  of  the  second.     Motto — "  Nisi  Dominus  frustra." 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

The  crozier  indicates  the  time  when  the  Abbot  of  Westminster  was  Lord 
of  the  Manor  of  Chelsea;  the  winged  bull  stands  for  the  patron  saint  of  the 
parish,  St  Luke  ;  the  lion  rampant  is  for  Cadogan  :  the  sword  and  the  boars' 
heads  for  Sir  Hans  Sloane,  and  the  stag's  head  for  Stanley.  Sir  Hans  Sloane, 
whose  collections  originated  the  British  Museum,  was  Lord  of  the  Manor,  which 
he  bequeathed  to  his  daughter.s,  one  becoming  Lady  Cadogan  and  the  other 
marrying  into  the  Stanley  family. 

CHELTENHAM  (Gloucestershire).  Or,  a  chevron  engrailed  gules,  between  two 
pigeons  in  chief  and  an  oak  tree  eradicated  in  base  proper,  on  a  chief  azure  a 
cross  flory  argent,  between  two  open  books  also  proper,  binding  and  clasps  of 
the  first.  And  for  the  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  upon  a  mount  be- 
tween two  branches  of  oak  a  fountain,  thereon  a  pigeon  all  proper.  Motto — 
"Salubritas  et  eruditio." 

Granted  February  26,  1887. 

CHELTENHAM  COLLEGE.     Per  bend  gules  and  sable,  on  a  bend  or,  between 
in  chief  two  swords  in  saltire  proper,  pommels  and  hilts  of  the  third,  and  in  base 
a  fasces  palewise  of  the  last,  a  mullet  of  the  first  between  two  fleurs-de-lis  of 
the  second.     Motto — "  Labor  omnia  vincit." 
[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.] 

CHEMISTS.     Refer  to  The  Pharmaceutical  Society. 


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CHELSEA,  BOROUGH  OF 


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CHEMNITZ  (Saxony).  Per  pale,  the  dexter  paly  of  four  or  and  azure,  the  sinister 
or,  a  lion  rampant  to  the  sinister  sable. 

CHESTER,  County  Palatine  of.  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  but  the  following 
appear  to  be  in  general  use,  namely,  azure,  three  garbs,  two  and  one  or  (being 
the  arms  of  the  old  Earls  of  Chester  and  the  arms  of  the  Earldom  of  Chester), 
within  a  garter,  and  surmounted  by  an  earl's  coronet.  Supporters — Two  dragons 
sejant  addorsed  gules  {i.e.  with  their  backs  to  the  escutcheon),  each  holding  in 
its  exterior  claw  an  ostrich  feather  argent  affixed  to  a  scroll.  Motto — "  Antiqui 
colant  antiquum  dierum."  The  garter,  coronet,  dragons,  and  ostrich  feathers, 
of  course,  have  palpable  reference  to  H.R.H.  the  Prince  of  Wales  being  Earl  of 
Chester.  The  arms  of  the  Earldom  of  Chester  appear  upon  the  second  great 
seal  of  Henry  IV.  ;  and  upon  the  seal  of  the  County  Council  of  Cheshire  the 
same  arms  appear,  though  in  this  case  flanked  on  either  side  by  an  ostrich 
feather  and  surmounted  by  an  open  coronet  composed  of  crosses  patt^e  and 
fleurs-de-lis. 

CHESTER,  City  of.     Gules,  three  lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  or,  being  the  arms 
of  England,  dimidiated  with  those  of  Randolph  de  Meschines,  Earl  of  Chester 
— namely,  azure  three  garbs  two  and  one  or.     Crest — A  sword  in  pale,  sheathed, 
encircled  by  a  fillet  adorned  throughout  with  gold.     Supporters — On  the  dexter 
side  a  lion  proper  gorged  with  a  ducal  coronet  argent,  and  on  the  sinister  side 
a  wolf  argent,  ducally  gorged  or.     Motto — "  Antiqui  colant  antiquum  dierum." 
Wreath  or,  gules,  and  azure.     Mantling  "  partly  red  and   partly  azure,  on  the 
inside  lined  with  silver."     The  helmet,  which  appears  always  to  be  used  with  the 
arms  of  Chester,  is  afifrontee  but  with  the  visor  closed.     The  following  translation 
of  the  original  grant,  which  is  dated  September  3,  15S0,  is  worthy  of  quotation  : 
"  To  all  and  Singular  both  Kings  of  Arms  and  Heralds  as  well  nobles  and 
other  who    shall  see  or  hear  this    writing  William   Flower  Esquire,  otherwise 
styled  Norroy  King  of  Arms  and  Chief  Herald  for  the  North  part  of  England 
sends  Eternal  Greeting  in  the  Lord.     Whereas  Venerable  Men  the  Mayor  and 
Citizens  of  the  City  of  Chester  as  also  their  predecessors  have  been  endowed 
with    many   and  distinguished   privileges   by  the   Kings    of   England  and  the 
Palatine   Earls  of  Chester  and  have  been   incorporated  by  the   name  of  the 
Mayor  and  Citizens  of  the  City  of  Chester  by  the  virtue  of  which  incorporation 
indeed  the  aforesaid  City  (as  also  other  Cities  of  the  Kingdom  of  England)  is 
rendered  much  more  renowned  and  notable  by  the  long  use  and  display  of  Arms 
or  insignia  BUT  SINCE  by  the  ancient  Arms  and  Insignia  of  the  aforesaid  City 
having  been  laid  aside   and  almost  entirely  eff"aced    from  Memory  they  have 
assumed  to  themselves  other  new  and  pretended  insignia  and  have  used  the 
same  for  many  past  years,  in  which  thing  a  grave  error  was  committed  by  the 
negligence  and  carelessness  of  those  whom  it  chiefly  concerned  AND  because 
there  is  neither  found  above  the  aforesaid  Ancient  Arms  or  Insignia  (which  has 
commonly  and  to  some  others  likewise  happened)  any  helmet  of  augmentation 
(which  they  call  tymbrum  or  Crest)  properly  emblazoned,  nor  at  the  sides  of 

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ANTIQUI'COI-'^NT:  «\NTlSUUM'OieF<.UM 


/BRAi:; 


CHESTER 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

the  Arms  collateral  Animals  (which  we  commonly  call  Supporters)  to  which 
the  guardianship  of  the  Shield  is  committed. 

"Therefore  I  the  aforesaid  Norrey  King  of  Arms  not  only  having  performed 
that  which  belongs  to  my  office  in  the  reformation  of  errors  of  former  times 
have  restored  to  the  said  City  fully  and  entirely  by  (these)  presents  the  ancient 
arms  or  insignia  distinguished  by  red  and  azure  or  blue  of  which  the  first  part 
(which  can  be  truly  stiled  Royal)  displays  as  splendidly  as  possible  three 
dimidiated  lions  passant  and  regardient  or,  but  the  other  part  borrowed  from 
Earls  palatine  themselves  bears  one  entire  garb  and  another  dimidiated  garb  or, 
before  it — And  moreover  having  been  earnestly  entreated  that  I  would  not  fail 
the  aforesaid  City  on  this  part,  but  that  rather  so  far  as  in  me  lies  I  should 
gratify  a  city  and  society  so  illustrious  and  so  well  deserving  of  our  prince  and 
country,  for  the  greater  and  more  ample  dignity  of  the  said  City  I  have  assigned 
for  crest  over  the  helmet  an  upright  sword  sheathed,  the  emblem  of  Majesty  and 
Justice,  encircled  by  a  fillet  adorned  throughout  with  gold  situated  over  a  collar 
distinguished  by  gold,  red,  and  azure  colours,  together  with  mantlings  and 
appendages  folded  partly  red  and  partly  azure,  on  the  inside  lined  with  silver. 
And  furthermore  I  have  appointed  for  the  support  of  the  buckler  or  shield  on 
the  dexter  a  Lion  crowned  about  the  neck  with  a  silver  crown,  and  on  the 
sinister  a  Wolf  argent  in  like  manner  girt  about  the  neck  with  a  golden  crown 
even  as  for  the  more  full  and  clear  understanding  of  these  I  have  caused  them 
to  be  illuminated,  delineated,  and  painted  more  to  life  in  their  proper  metals 
and  colours  in  the  margin  of  these  presents.  The  which  ancient  insignia  of  the 
shield,  together  with  the  apex  or  crest  of  a  helmet  placed  upon  it,  and  also  the 
aforesaid  collateral  animals  sustaining  and  supporting  the  said  shield.  I  the 
before  named  Norrey  King  of  Arms  by  virtue  and  authority  of  my  function 
and  office  granted  to  me  by  the  Queens  Majesty  in  this  behalf  that  I 
might  willingly  give  honour  to  the  Honourable  the  said  Mayor  and  citizens 
of  the  aforesaid  City  of  Chester  and  to  their  successors  to  the  greater  increase 
of  honour  and  dignity  and  perpetual  ornament  of  the  said  City  have  given 
delivered  and  by  these  presents  have  confirmed  in  perpetuity.  To  have 
to  use  and  to  display  for  the  sake  of  honour  in  whatsoever  place  and  at 
^^l)atsoever  ti'me  at  their  sole  will  and  pleasure  any  impediment,  contra- 
diction or  prohibition  which  God  forbid  notwithstanding.  In  Faith  and  testi- 
mony in  all  and  singular  of  which  I  the  aforesaid  Norroy  King  of  Arms  have 
by  these  presents  with  my  own  proper  hand  subscribed  my  name  and  by  the 
appending  of  the  Seal  of  my  Office  have  confirmed  this  my  present  diploma  Given, 
at  Chester  the  third  day  of  September  in  the  year  of  our  Saviour  Christ  1580 
and  in  the  22nd  year  of  the  reign  of  Her  Royal  Highness  Queen  Elizabeth. 

"  P  moy  Wyllam  Flower  Esquyer, 
alias  Norrey  R.  D'Armes. 

"  Confirmed  by  me  Richard  St  George  Norroy  King  at  Armes  in  my 
Visitation  161 3." 

CHESTER,  See  of.     Gules,  three  mitres  labelled  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

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THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CHESTER  or  STRAND  INN  (London).  Sable,  three  garbs  argent,  all  within  a 
bordure  gules. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

CHESTER  HERALD.     Badge,  a  garb. 

CHESTER,  Trade  Companies.     Refer  to  the  several  Trades. 

CHESTER.     Refer  to  King's  School. 

CHESTERFIELD  (Derbyshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  laie  seal 
showed  an  escutcheon  charged  with  a  fesse  and  thereon  a  lozenge.  No  tinctures 
were  shown,  but  upon  the  Corporation  notepaper  the  fesse  was  engraved  "  or." 
The  field  and  lozenge  being  left  argent,  this,  of  course,  was  bad  heraldry.  The 
legend  is  "  Burg  de  Chesterfield." 

But  the  Town-Clerk  has  been  good  enough  to  forward  me  a  printed  notice 
(as  under)  relating  to  a  resolution  of  the  Council.  Only  the  device  upon  the 
seal  is  officially  made  use  of,  but  the  subjoined  notice  seems  to  contemplate 
armorial  usage;  and  therefore  it  cannot  be  too  widely  known  that  as  arms  the 
design  is  bogus  and  not  of  the  least  authority.  It  is  a  pity  that  when  the 
matter  was  under  consideration  and  a  change  contemplated,  a  proper  and  formal 
grant  of  arms  was  not  obtained.     The  notice  runs  : — 

"  The  Arms  on  the  small  silver  Seal  of  seventeenth  century  date,  enlarged 
about  1818  for  the  Seal  lately  in  use,  are,  as  often  has  been  pointed  out,  bad 
heraldry,  namely,  metal  on  metal — a  mistake  that  probably  arose  through  the 
blunder  of  an  uneducated  engraver. 

"  The  seventeenth  century  Arms,  according  to  the  College  of  Arms,  were 
those  lately  used,  but  tinctured  '  gules  on  a  fesse  or  a  lozenge  azure.' 

"These  Arms  were  never  formally  granted.  There  is  no  explanation  forth- 
coming why  they  were  ever  adopted  and  used,  and  they  are  certainly  no  older  than 
the  seventeenth  century.  There  was  no  reason  why  they  should  not  be  discarded. 
On  the  contrary,  there  is  abundant  proof  of  the  old  Arms  (or  badge)  on  the  Cor- 
porate Seal  of  the  Borough,  which  were  in  use  for  some  centuries  before  the  seven- 
teenth century  Arms  were  used,  and  there  was  every  reason  to  assume  the  old,  or, 
proper,  Arms  without  alteration,  particularly  as  they  are  unique  and  highly 
interesting. 

"  From  the  nature  of  the  art  shown  in  the  impression  of  the  old  Borough 
Seal  attached  to  the  Charter  of  Elizabethan  date,  and  from  the  style  of  lettering, 
it  is  certain  that  the  Seal  from  which  this  impression  was  taken  was  of  thirteenth 
century  date,  and  hence,  in  all  probability,  was  the  first  Seal  designed  after  the 
granting  to  the  Borough  of  Henry  UI.'s  Charter.  Heraldically  the  Arms  of 
the  Elizabethan  Seal  may  be  described  as  a  Pomegranate  Tree,  eradicated  and 
fructed.  By  '  eradicated  '  is  meant  showing  its  roots  ;  by  '  fructed,'  in  a  state 
of  fruition.  Then  as  to  colours,  this  can  only  be  surmised  ;  but  if  used  as  Arms 
as  well  as  a  Seal,  they  will  be  needed.  Dr  Cox  suggests  that  the  field  should 
be  '  gules '  or  red,  and  the  tree  '  proper,'  that  is,  according  to  nature.     The 

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THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

description  would  then  read,  '  Gules  a  pomegranate  tree  eradicated  and  fructed 
proper.'  '  Proper'  would  give  the  colours  of  the  tree  dark-green  ;  of  the  roots 
brown ;  of  the  fruit  yellow.  The  fruit  is  intended  to  be  represented  '  seeded,' 
that  is,  burst  in  the  centre  and  showing  the  seeds,  which  was  usual  in  the 
heraldic  Pomegranates  ;  the  seeds  would  be  'gules'  or  red. 

"  It  may  be  added  that  the  town  of  Tregony,  Cornwall,  has  for  its  Arms  a 
single  Pomegranate ;  so  too  has  the  Kingdom  of  Granada — but  Chesterfield  is 
the  only  instance  in  heraldry,  private  or  corporate,  of  a  Pomegranate  Tree, 
though  other  trees  occur  rarely  as  Arms.  The  emblematic  meaning  of 
Pomegranate  is  'good.' 

"The  Council,  on  the  13th  June  1893,  unanimously  resolved  '  that  the  Arms 
of  the  Borough  be  resumed  and  used,  and  a  Seal  engraved  with  a  Pomegranate 
tree  eradicated  and  fructed  be,  and  the  same  was  adopted  as  and  for  the  Cor- 
porate Common  Seal  of  the  Borough,  and  that  the  Arms  and  Seal  of  the 
Borough  then  in  use  be  disavouched,  and  the  Seal  destroyed  in  the  presence  of 
the  Mayor  and  Town-Clerk.' 

"  Herewith  is  sent  a  wax  impression  of  the  new  Corporate  Seal  referred  to 
in  the  resolution." 


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CHICHESTER  (Sussex).  Argent,  gutt^e-de-poix,  on  a  chief  indented  gules,  a 
lion  passant  guardant  or.     Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms. 

A  manuscript  in  Ulster's  Office  shows  the  arms  as  per  fesse  argent  and 
chequy  or  and  gules,  in  chief  a  tower  triple-towered  azure.  It  would  be 
interesting  to  know  the  origin  of  this. 

CHICHESTER,  See  of.  The  correct  blazon  of  these  arms  is  "  Azure,  our 
Blessed  Lord  in  judgment  seated  on  His  throne  crowned,  and  a  glory  about  His 
head,  His  right  hand  upraised  in  benediction  and  His  left  holding  an  open  book 
all  or,  and  out  of  His  mouth  a  two-edged  sword,  point  to  the  sinister  gules." 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

Either  an  intentional  change  has  been  made  in  an  avoidance  of  idolatry,  or 
possibly  mere  error  has  crept  in,  but  this  coat  is  usually  blazoned  as  follows  : — 
"  Azure,  a  Presbyter  John  sitting  on  a  tombstone,  in  his  left  hand  a  mound,  his 
right  extended  all  or,  with  a  linen  mitre  on  his  head  and  in  his  mouth  a  sword 
proper." 

This  devicefirst  appearson  the  seal  of  Bishop  Richard  de  la  Wich  (1245-53). 

In  Woodward's  Ecclesiastical  Heraldry  it  is  stated  that  the  shield  is  borne 
"  between  two  golden  candlesticks  with  candles  illuminated  proper."  I  cannot 
find  any  official  authority  for  this,  and  if,  as  is  doubtless  the  case,  candlesticks 
are  to  be  found  in  some  early  seals,  their  position  can  only  be  that  of  appropriate 
ornament  rather  than  that  of  being  any  integral  part  of  the  armorial  insignia 
of  the  See. 

CHICHESTER,  Dean  of.     The  figure  of  Our  Lord  as  in  the  arms  of  the  See, 
between  the  Greek  letters  A  and  Q. 
[Of  no  authority.] 


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CHILI.  Azure,  in  base  a  volcano  and  mountains  proper,  in  the  middle  chief  point 
a  mullet  radiated  argent.     Crest. — An  eagle,  wings  expanded,  proper. 

Another  Coat. — Per  fesse  azure  and  gules,  a  mullet  of  five  points  argent. 
Crest — A  plume  of  three  ostrich  feathers  gules,  argent  and  azure.  Supporters — 
(Dexter)  a.-hdrse,  (sinister)  a'vulture;  both  crowned  or. 

CHINA.  Or,  a  Chinese  dragon  azure,  garnished  gules,  on  each  foot  five  distinct 
claws. 

Note. — "  It  is  said  that,  by  a  standing  law  of  the  empire,  no  mandarin  or 
nobleman,  on  pain  of  death,  shall  have  any  more  than  four  claws  to  each  foot 
of  the  dragon  which  he  hath  on  his  clothes,  or  on  his  shield  of  arms." 

CHINA,  Ecclesiastical  Sees.     Refer  to  North  China  and  Mid  China. 

CHIPPENHAM  (Wiltshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  recorded  in 
the  visitations  of  the  County  represents  a  tree,  and  suspended  therefrom  two 
escutcheons.  Burke,  in  his  "  General  Armory,"  blazons  the  whole  as  a  coat-of 
arms  as  follows  : — "  Argent,  a  tree  of  three  large  branches  vert,  between  two 
escutcheons — viz.,  that  on  the  dexter  azure  ten  billets  argent,  in  chief  a  label  of 
five  points  of  the  last,  the  sinister  escutcheon  or,  three  legs  in  armour  proper, 
garnished  or,  coupled  at  the  middle  of  the  thigh  two  and  one,  on  each  a  spur  of 
the  last.     Motto—'  Unity  and  loyalty.'  " 

CHIPPING  NORTON  (Oxfordshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal 
represents  upon  a  mount  a  castle,  the  two  towers  each  surmounted  by  a  cupola 
and  flag,  and  above  the  centre  battlements  the  letters  I.R.  The  legend  is 
"  Sigil.  Burg,  de  Chippingnorton.     Feby.  1606." 

CHIPPING  SODBURY  (Gloucestershire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The 
seal  recorded  in  the  visitation  books  shows  an  escutcheon  without  tinctures 
charged  with  three  lions  passant  guardant  in  pale.  This  is  probably  simply  the 
Royal  Coat.     The  legend  is  "The  Burough  of  Chipping  Sodbury,  1680." 

CHIPPING- WYCOMBE  (Buckinghamshire).     See  Wycombe. 

CHIRURGEONS'  COMPANY.     Refer  to  Barbers'  Company. 


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THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CHORLEY  (Lancashire).     Or,  on  a  chevron  gules,  three  escocheons  argent,  each 
charged  with  a  bhje-bottle  slipped  and  leaved  proper,  on  a  chief  of  the  second  a 
crown  vallary  of  the  first.     Motto — "Beware." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  July  3,  1882.] 

CHOTA  NAGPUR,  See  of  (India).     No  arms  exist. 

CHRISTCHURCH  (Hants).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  a 
saint  seated  beneath  a  canopy.  The  legend  is  "  Sj  comune  ville  xpi  ecclie  de 
Twinham." 

CHRIST  CHURCH  (London).  Azure,  the  representation  of  the  Trinity  argent 
being  expressed  by  four  plates,  two  in  chief,  one  in  the  middle  point,  and  one 
in  base,  conjoined  to  each  other  by  an  orle  and  a  ]">all  argent,  on  the  centre  plate 
is  the  word  "  Deus,"  on  the  dexter  chief  plate  "Tater,"  on  the  sinister  "  Filius," 
and  on  the  plate  in  the  base  the  words  "  Sanctus  Spiritus,"  on  the  three 
parts  of  the  pall  the  word  "  est,"  and  on  each  part  of  the  orle  the  words 
"  non  est." 

CHRIST  CHURCH  COLLEGE  (Oxford).  (Founded  1546,  by  Thomas  Wolsey, 
Cardinal,  and  Archbishop  of  York.)  Sable,  on  a  cross  engrailed  argent,  a  lion 
passant  gules,  between  four  leopards'  faces  azure,  on  a  chief  or,  a  rose  of  the 
third,  seeded  of  the  fifth,  barbed  vert  between  two  Cornish  choughs  proper. 
Above  the  shield  is  placed  a  Cardinal's  hat. 
[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.] 

CHRIST  CHURCH,  See  of(New  Zealand).     Azure,  on  a  cross  argent  the  mono- 
gram )lc  sable,  in  the  first  canton  three  estoiles,  one  and  two  of  the  second. 
[Of  no  authority.] 


180 


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CHORLEY 


CHRIST  CHURCH  COLLEGE  (OXFORD 


CHRIST  CHURCH,  SEE  OF  (NEW  ZEALAND) 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CHRIST  COLLEGE  (Cambridge).  (Founded  1505,  by  Margaret,  Countess  of 
Richmond,  daughter  and  sole  heir  of  John  Beaufort,  Duke  of  Somerset,  and 
mother  of  King  Henry  VH.)  Quarterly,  France  and  England,  within  a  bordure 
gobony  argent  and  azure. 

[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.] 

CHRISTIANIA  (Norway).     Azure,  a  representation  of  St seated  proper,  and 

vested  argent,  the  cloak  gules,  holding  in  the  dexterhand  a  (?  millstone)  and  in  the 
sinister  three  arrows,  points  downwards,  and  reclining  in  base  a  female  figure. 

CHRISTMAS  ISLAND.     Refer  to  Straits  Settlements. 

CHRIST'S  HOSPITAL  (Blue  Coat  School).     The  arms  of  the  City  of  London 
(argent,  a  cross  gules,  in  the  first  quarter  a  sword  erect  of  the  last)  on  a  chief 
azure,  a  rose  argent  between  two  fleurs-de-lis  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

CHURCH  OF  SCOTLAND.  Has  no  arms,  but  for  centuries  has  used  the  device 
of  a  Burning  Bush  with  the  motto,  "  Nee  tamen  consumebatur."  The  device  first 
appears  on  the  title-page  of  "  The  Acts  and  Proceedings  of  the  General  Assembly 
of  1690,"  with  the  Motto,  "  Not  consumed."  It  had,  however,  been  adopted  in  1 583 
at  the  Twelfth  National  Synod  of  the  French  Reformed  Church,  when  it  was 
resolved  that  a  seal  be  made,  and  on  this  seal  was  engraved  the  Burning  Bush 
with  the  words,  "  Flagror  non  Consumor."  The  Irish  Presbyterian  Church  uses 
the  Motto,  "  Ardens  sed  Virens." 


182 


CHRIST  COLLEGE  (CAMBRIDGE) 


CHRISTIANIA 


TO    ! 


CHRIST'S  HOSPITAL 


CHURCH  OF  SCOTLAND 


THE   BOOK   OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

CINQUE  PORTS,  CORPORATION  OF.  Per  pale  gules  and  azure  three  demi- 
lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  dimidiated  with  and  conjoined  to  as  many  demi- 
hulks  of  ships,  all  or. 

[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.  If  reference  be  made  to  the  arms  of  Dover 
(Mayor's  Seal),  Deal,  Romney,  Sandwich,  Hastings,  Rye,  and  Tenterden,  one 
cannot  help  wondering  whether  the  dimidiation  of  the  arms  of  England  with  the 
azure,  three  hulks  of  ships,  may  not  have  stood  for  the  Ro)'al  Naval  privileges 
and  duties  formerly  assigned  to  the  Cinque  i'orts  as  a  part  of  the  State.] 

CIRENCESTER  (Gloucestershire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  arms  used 
and  mentioned  by  Berry  as  erroneous  are  argent  {?)  a  phcenix  in  flames  proper. 
Debrett's  "  House  of  Commons  "  gives  them. 

CIVILIANS'  COLLEGE.     Refer  to  Doctors'  Commons. 

CLACKMANNANSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings:  nor  are  any  claimed. 
The  seal  of  the  County  Council  represents  the  old  Tower  on  Clackmannan  Hill, 
Clackmannan  being  the  county  town.  The  legend  is  "  Seal  of  the  County 
Council  of  Clackmannan." 

CLARE,  County.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

CLARE,  or  CLARENCE  (Honour  of).  Per  chevron  gules  and  azure,  two  lions 
rampant  combatant,  or. 

[The  arms  as  above  are  so  given  by  Burke  in  his  "  General  Armory  " — but  it  is 
not  without  interest  to  observe  that  the  arms  of  Sir  John  de  Clarence  (natural 
son  of  Thomas,  Duke  of  Clarence,  son  of  King  Henry  IV.)  were  per  chevron 
gules  and  azure  in  chief,  two  lions  counter-rampant,  and  in  base  a  fleur-de-lis,  or.] 

CLARE  HALL  (Cambridge).  (Originally  founded  by  Richard  Baden,  Chancellor  of 
Cambridge,  but  in  the  year  1347  he,  with  Walter  de  Thaxsted,  the  then  master, 
resigned  the  foundation  into  the  hands  of  Elizabetli,  daughter  of  Gilbert  de 
Clare,  Earl  of  Gloucester,  and  wife  of  John  de  Burgh,  Earl  of  Ulster,  when  it 
was  renamed  Clare  Hall.) 

Or,  three  chevrons  gules  for  Clare  impaling  or,  a  cross  gules  for  de  Burgh, 
both  within  a  bordure  sable,  guttee  d'or. 

[The  arms  of  the  wife  are  here  placed  on  the  dexter  side,  she  being  the 
foundress.     These  arms  are  recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

CLARENCEUX  KING  OF  ARMS.  Argent,  a  cross  gules,  on  a  chief  of  the 
second,  a  lion  passant  guardant  or,  crowned  of  the  last. 

[These  arms  of  office  are  either  borne  alone  or  impaled  on  the  de.xter  side  of 
the  personal  arms  of  Clarenceux.  The  escutcheon  is  surmounted  by  his  official 
crown.] 


184 


CINQUE  PORTS 


CIRENCESTER 


CLARE  HALL  (CAMBRIDGE) 


CLARENCEUX  KING  OF  ARMS 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CLEMENTS*  INN  (London).     Argent,  an  anchor  without  a  stock  in  pale  proper, 
with  a  capital  C  couchant  upon  it  sable. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

CLERGY,  Sons  of  the,  Corporation.     Refer  to  next  entry. 

CLERGYMEN'S  WIDOWS  AND  CHILDREN,  The  Society  for  the  Relief  of. 

Lozengy  argent  and  sable,  on  a  chief  purpure  a  cross  pattee  or,  between  two 
books  open  of  the  first,  garnished  and  clasped  of  the  fourth.  Crest- — On  a  wreath 
of  tlie  colours,  a  female  figure,  the  emblem  of  Charity,  vested  in  a  loose  garment 
sable,  head,  breast,  hands,  and  feet,  proper,  hair  dishevelled,  or,  accompanied 
with  three  naked  boys,  one  on  the  dexter  side  and  one  in  each  arm  of  the 
second,  crined  of  the  third.     Motto — "Quod  eorum  minimis  mihi." 

[These  arms,  said  to  have  been  designed  by  Sir  Christopher  Wren,  were 
granted  by  Dugdale,  Garter,  and  St  George,  Clarenceux,  29th  November  1685. 
No  fees  were  charged  by  these  officers  for  this  grant.] 

CLERKS.     See  Parish  Clerks. 

CLIFFORD'S    INN  (London;.     Chequy  or  and  azure,  a  fesse  gules,  all   within 
a  bordure  of  the  last  charged  with  eight  bezants. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

CLIFTON  COLLEGE.  Argent,  a  chevron  between  two  trefoils  slipped  in  chief 
and  a  garb  in  base  azure,  a  chief  gules,  thereon  a  ducal  coronet,  or,  between 
two  books  argent,  clasped  and  garnished  gold.     Motto — "  Spiritus  intus  alit." 

[Granted  Sth  April  1895.  The  Grant  is  printed  in  "The  Cliftonian,"  Vol. 
xiv..  No.  2.] 


186 


CLEMENTS    INN 


CLERGY  WIDOWS'  AND  ORPHANS'  SOCIETY 


O     O     Ol 

u 

u 

ip^ 

LLi^oj 

n 


CLIFFORD'S  INN 


CLIFTON    COLLEGE 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CLITHEROE  (Lancashire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Burke's  "General 
Armory  "  quotes  "  Az.  on  a  mount  vert,  a  castle  embattled,  with  three  towers 
domed,  on  each  a  pennon  all  or." 

CLOCKMAKERS,  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  22nd  August 
163 1.)  Sable,  a  clock,  each  of  the  four  pillars  of  the  case  erected  on  a  lion 
couchant,  and  on  each  capital  a  globe,  thereon  a  cross  pattee,  and  on  the  dome 
of  the  case  an  Imperial  crown,  all  or.  The  helmet  mantled  gules,  doubled 
argent.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  sphere  or.  Supporters — (Dexter) 
An  emblematical  figure  representing  Time,  (sinister)  the  portrait  of  an  Emperor 
in  his  robes,  on  his  head  an  Imperial  crown,  and  in  his  sinister  hand  a  sceptre, 
all  proper.     Motto — "  Tempus  rerum  imperator." 

[Granted  by  Sir  Edward  Walker,  Garter,  31st  January  167 1-2.] 
The  original  grant  is  exhibited  in  the  Guildhall,  London. 

CLOGHER,  See  of  Azure,  a  bishop  in  pontifical  robes  seated  on  his  chair  of 
state,  and  leaning  towards  the  sinister,  his  left  hand  supporting  a  crozier,  his 
right  hand  upraised  in  benediction,  all  or,  the  feet  upon  a  cushion  gules  tasselled 
gold. 

[This  coat,  which  is  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office,  remains  in  use,  but  through 
the  disestablishment  of  the  Irish  Church  it  is  really  extinct  and  its  present 
use  is  illegal.] 


188 


CLITHEROE 


CLOGHER,  SEE  OF 


CLOCKMAKERS'  COMPANY 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CLONFERT,  See  of.     Azure,  two  croziers  in  saltire,  or. 

[This  coat  is  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office,  but  through  the  disestablishment 
of  the  Irish  Church  it  is  really  extinct,  and  its  present  use  is  illegal.] 

CLONFERT.     Refer  to  Killaloe,  Kilfenora,  Clonfert  and  Kilmacduagh,  Bishop  of 

CLONMEL  (Co.  Tipperary).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in  Ulster's 
Office.  Those  used  are  as  follows — namely,  "  Argent,  over  water,  therein  three 
fishes  naiant,  two  and  one,  a  bridge  of  five  arches  and  thereon  a  stag  in  full 
course  pursued  by  a  greyhound  all  proper."  Crest — A  raven  proper.  Supporters — 
On  either  side  a  greyhound  proper,  gorged  with  a  collar  .  .  .  Motto — "  Fidelis 
in  JEternum."  The  common  seal  of  the  town  of  Clonmel  represents  upon  a 
wreath  a  sword  erect  point  upwards,  the  blade  enfiled  by  two  branches  {)  of 
laurel)  in  saltire,  with  the  motto  "  Hsec  inde."  The  Mayor's  seal  represents  a 
figure  of  Justice  which  is  sometimes  quoted  as  the  arms.  Is  it  simply  a  coin- 
cidence that  the  dexter  supporter  of  Lord  Clonmel's  achievement  is  also  a  figure 
of  Justice? 

CLOTH  MANUFACTORY  AT  NEWMILLS,  The  Company  of  Vert,  a  fleece 
of  wool  proper,  between  two  thistle-heads  in  chief  and  a  key  palewaj's  in  base  or. 
Crest — Two  naked  arms  supporting  a  globe.  Supporters — Two  workmen  in  their 
habit,  and  leaning  on  their  shears,  all  proper.  Motto — "  Velat  haec  et  altera 
munit." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  22nd  March  1692.] 

CLOTHIERS.     Refers  to  Weavers  of  Worcester. 


190 


CLONFERT,  SEE  OF 


CLONMEL 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CLOTHWORKERS,  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Company  of  Sheermen 
incorporated  by  Henry  VII.,  and  the  Fullers'  Company,  28th  April  1480. 
United  into  one  Corporation  by  the  title  of  Clothworkers,  i8th  January  1528.) 
Sable,  a  chevron  ermine  between  two  habicks  in  chief  argent,  and  a  teazle  in 
base  slipped  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  mount  vert,  thereon  a 
ram  statant  or.  Supporters — Two  griffins  or,  pellettde.  Motto — "  My  trust  is 
in  God  alone." 

[Arms  granted  by  Thomas  Benolt,  Clarenceux,  1530,  crest  and  supporters 
granted  by  Robert  Cooke,  Clarenceux,  25th  March  15S7.  Grant  printed  "Misc. 
Gen.  et  Her.,"  ii.  173-5.  Confirmed  and  entered  by  Henry  St  George  at  the 
Visitation  of  the  City  of  London,  1634.] 

CLOYNE,  See  of  Azure,  a  mitre  labelled  or,  between  three  crosses  pattee  fitchee 
argent. 

[This  coat  is  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office,  but  b}-  the  disestablishment  of  the 
Irish  Church  it  has  now  become  extinct.] 

CLOYNE.     Refer  to  Cork,  Cloyne,  and  Ross,  Bishop  of. 

CLYDE  NAVIGATION,  Trustees  of.  Parted  per  saltire  argent  and  azure,  in 
chief  a  ship  in  full  sail  proper,  flagged  with  the  banner  of  Scotland  and  in  base 
issuing  from  a  mount  an  oak-tree,  the  stem  surmounted  of  a  salmon  on  its  back 
with  a  signet-ring  in  its  mouth,  on  the  top  of  the  tree  a  robin  redbreast,  and  on 
the  sinister  side  an  ancient  handbell  all  proper.  Mantling — Azure,  doubled 
argent.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  liveries,  an  anchor  or,  cabled  of  the  same. 
Motto—"  Floreat  Clutha." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  24th  June  191 2.] 


192 


CLOTHWORKERS,  COMPANY  OF 


CLOYNE,  SEE  OF 


CLYDE  NAVIGATION  TRUST 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CLYDEBANK.  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  shows  a  fine  healthy  specimen  of  home- 
made heraldry,  viz.,  Argent,  a  saltire  gules,  in  chief  a  sewing-machine,  in  base 
a  battle-ship,  in  fesse  on  the  dexter  a  stag's  head  caboshed,  and  on  the  sinister 
a  lion  rampant.     Crest — A  garb.     Motto — "  Lahore  et  scientia." 

COACH  AND  COACH-HARNESS-MAKERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of 
(London).  (Incorporated  31st  May  1677).  Azure,  a  chevron  between  three 
coaches,  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  their  colours,  a  Phcjebus  in  his  glory  sitting 
in  his  chariot  or,  drawn  through  a  cloud  proper  by  four  horses  argent,  housed, 
reined,  and  bridled,  or.  Supporters — Two  horses  argent,  bridled  and  harnessed, 
sable,  the  harness  studded  or,  garnished  gules,  and  housed  azure,  with  fringe  and 
purfling  or,  adorned  also  with  plumes  of  feathers  or,  azure,  argent,  and  gules. 
Motto—"  Surgit  Post  nubila  Phcebus." 

[Granted  by  Sir  William  Dugdale,  Garter,  and  Sir  Henry  St  George, 
Norroy,  17th  July  1677.] 

COATBRIDGE  (Lanarkshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The 
common  seal  defies  a  concise  verbal  description.     Motto — "  Laborare  est  orare." 

COCKENZIE  AND  PORT  SETON.  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  shows  three 
escutcheons  :  {a)  the  Royal  Arms  of  Scotland,  {b)  the  arms  of  Seton,  viz.,  three 
crescents  within  the  double  tressure,  {c)  a  representation  of  Preston  Tower. 
Between  the  escutcheons  are  a  swan  (the  crest  of  the  Earl  of  Wemyss),  a  stag's 
head  couped  (the  crest  of  Cadell),  and  an  anchor. 

COCKERMOUTH  (Cumberland).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

COCOS  ISLANDS  (otherwise  Keeling  Islands).     Refer  to  Straits  Settlements. 

COIRE,  Bishopric  of     Argent,  a  goat  salient  sable. 

COLCHESTER  (Essex).  Gules,  two  staves  raguly  and  couped  argent,  one  in 
pale,  surmounted  by  another  in  fesse  between  two  ducal  coronets  in  chief  or 
the  bottom  part  of  the  staff  enfiled  with  a  ducal  coronet  of  the  last. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms  (see  Fig.  a).] 

On  3rd  March  191 5  the  Corporation  of  Colchester  considered  a  report  by 
Alderman  Benham  concerning  the  arms  of  the  Borough,  which  drew  attention 
to  their  emblazonment  on  the  Letters  Patent  granted  to  Colchester,  7th  July 
141 3,  by  King  Henry  V.,  this  being  the  earliest  known  example  of  them,  and 
in  pursuance  of  a  motion  by  the  Alderman  it  was  resolved  to  revert  to  the 
original  form  as  appearing  upon  the  Letters  Patent  "  and  as  also  employed 
upon  the  Common  Seal  of  the  Borough,  adopted  at  about  the  same  date,  and 
used  continuously  as  the  Borough  Seal  for  over  four  centuries." 

As  will  be  seen  from  the  illustration  (Fig.  B),  the  difference  consists  of  the 
method  of  the  intersection  of  the  limbs  of  the  cross  and  the  introduction  of  three 
nails  therein  below  the  crowns.  It  is,  of  course,  possible  the  nails  were  originally 
constituent  parts  of  the  arms,  but  knowing  the  licence  claimed  in  early  times 
by  heraldic  artists,  and  considering  the  character  of  the  emblazonment  upon  the 

194 


AN    ,  i!!/"i/%.* 


CLYDEBANK 


J  B  L.  i  9    I 


COACHMAKERS,  COMPANY  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

charter,  the  probabilities  seem  rather  in  favour  of  these  alleged  differences  being 
no  more  than  artistic  elaboration  of  the  arms  by  an  ecclesiastic  to  emphasize 
the  legend  of  their  origin. 

[Refer  to  "The  Essex  County  Standard,"  6th  March  191 5,  and  "The  Essex 
Review,"  January  1914.] 

Is  it  simply  a  coincidence  that  these  arms  are  identical  with  those  of  the 
town  of  Nottingham  (except  that  in  the  latter  case  the  staves  are  vert),  or  is 
there  some  connection  ?  The  arms  of  Colchester  are  frequently  quoted  wrongly 
as  "gules  two  staves  raguly  and  couped  argent  one  in  pale  surmounted  by 
another  in  fesse  between  four  ducal  coronets  or."  The  following  newspaper 
cutting  records  a  legend  which  has  evidently  been  accepted  in  the  designing  of 
the  present  seal  of  the  Corporation.     I  give  it  for  what  it  is  worth  : — 

"  Colchester  offers  us  a  remarkable  escutcheon ;  no  less  remarkable  is  the 
story  attaching  to  it.  We  shall  at  once  recognise  the  cross  with  branches  or 
enragled,  as  heralds  term  it  [they  don't;  they  call  it  '  ragulcd  '  or  'raguly' — 
Ed.]  with  four  crowns  in  the  angles.  This  is  a  token  of  the  discovery  of  the 
true  cross  by  the  Empress  Helena,  who  was  a  native  of  Britain,  and  is  said  to 
have  been  the  daughter  of  Coel,  a  British  chieftain  whose  territor}'  was  adjacent 
to  Colchester.  St  Helena  married  Constantius,  and  was  the  mother  of  the  great 
Christian  Emperor  Constantine,  who  caused  her  to  be  proclaimed  Empress. 
She  was  not  converted  to  the  Christian  faith  till  she  was  about  sixty  years  old. 
At  this  age  she  undertook  a  journey  to  the  Holy  Land,  and  on  her  arrival  at 
Jerusalem  she  was  seized  with  the  desire  of  finding  the  true  cross.  She  was 
informed  that  she  would  be  able  to  do  this  if  she  could  discover  the  holy 
sepulchre  where  Christ  had  been  laid,  as  the  Jews  were  accustomed  to  bury  the 
instruments  of  punishment  near  the  grave  of  the  person  who  had  suffered.  Now 
the  heathens  had,  out  of  aversion  to  the  Christian  religion,  raised  a  mound  over 
the  place  of  our  Saviour's  entombment,  and  had  built  a  temple  to  Venus  upon 
it,  so  that  those  who  visited  the  holy  places  out  of  devotion  to  Christ  might 
appear  to  be  paying  homage  to  a  pagan  deity.  The  Empress,  however,  ordered 
excavations,  and  the  result  was  that  three  crosses  were  found.  It  was,  however, 
quite  uncertain  still  which  cross  was  the  one  upon  which  the  Saviour  had  been 
crucified.  An  ancient  legend  tells  how  this  was  determined.  There  happened 
to  be  at  the  time  in  Jerusalem  a  lady  who  was  lying  dangerously  ill.  It  was 
decided  to  ask  a  sign  from  heaven  by  which  the  true  cross  of  Christ  might  be 
recognised,  and  all  the  Christian  community  of  Jerusalem  joined  in  prayer  for 
this  object.  One  of  the  crosses  was  allowed  to  touch  the  sick  lady.  Nothing, 
however,  ensued.  Another  cross  was  applied  to  her  with  a  similar  result.  At 
last  the  remaining  cross  was  brought  to  her  bedside,  and  the  invalid  had  scarcely 
touched  it  ere  she  was  completely  restored  to  health  and  strength.  The  last 
cross  was  therefore  immediately  recognised  as  the  real  cross,  and  was  by  the 
Empress's  order  enclosed  in  a  case  of  silver  and  preserved  in  a  magnificent 
church  built  to  receive  it." 

COLCHESTER,  Bishop  of     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  oflicial  arms. 

196 


COLCHESTER  (Fig.  A) 


COLCHESTER  (Fig.  B) 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

COLDSTREAM  (Berwickshire).     Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 

COLERAINE  (Co.  Antrim).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in  Ulster's 
Office.  Those  represented  upon  the  seal  which  appear  to  be  in  general  use  are 
"  Argent  a  cross  gules,  in  the  first  quarter  a  sword  erect  of  the  last,  in  the  second 
quarter  a  fish  naiant  proper."  (Probably  founded  upon  the  arms  of  the  City  of 
London.)  An  earlier  seal  presented  by  Sir  Tristram  Beresford,  Bart,  (so  created 
1665,  died  1673)  shows  different  arms,  viz.  argent,  a  chevron  azure,  between  two 
garbs  in  chief  and  a  salmon  in  base  proper,  a  chief  of  the  arms  of  the  City  of 
London,  the  cross  thereof  charged  in  the  centre  with  a  harp. 

COLLEGE  OF  ARMS,  His  Majesty's.  Argent,  a  cross  gules  between  four  doves, 
the  dexter  wings  expanded  and  inverted  azure.  Crest — On  a  ducal  coronet  or, 
a  dove  rising  azure.  Supporters — Two  lions  rampant  guardant  argent,  ducally 
gorged  or. 

[The  Kings  of  Arms  have  official  arms,  and  the  Heralds  and  Pursuivants 
use  badges  for  their  offices.  Refer  to  Garter,  Clarenceux,  and  Norroy  Kings  ol 
Arms  :  Chester,  Lancaster,  Somerset,  Richmond,  Windsor,  and  York  Heralds, 
and  Rouge  Dragon,  Rouge  Croix,  Portcullis,  and  Bluemantle  Pursuivants 
Refer  also  to  Lyon  Court  for  Scotland,  and  Ulster's  Office  for  Ireland.] 

COLLEGE  OF  THE  HOLY  SPIRIT.     Refer  to  Holy  Spirit. 

COLLEGE  OF  PROFESSORS  OF  CIVIL  AND  CANON  LAW.  Refer  to 
Doctors'  Commons. 

COLLEGES  OF  PHYSICIANS.     Refer  to  Physicians. 

COLLEGES  OF  SURGEONS.     Refer  to  Surgeons  and  Veterinary  Surgeons. 

COLOGNE.     Argent,  on  a  chief  gules,  three  crowns  or. 

As  to  this  device  of  the  three  crowns  the  following  extract  from  one  of  the 
Harleian  MSS.  is  interesting  : 

"  Collin  (Cologne),  the  city  which  then  at  that  time  of  day  florished  much 
and  afforded  rayre  commodetes,  and  these  mercha'ts  that  vsually  traded  to  that 
citye  set  vp  their  signes  ouer  ther  dores  of  ther  Houses,  the  three  Kinges  of 
Collin,  with  the  Armes  of  that  Citye,  which  was  the  Three  Crouens  of  the 
former  kings  in  memorye  of  them,  and  by  those  signes  the  people  knew  in 
what  wares  they  deld  in." 

The  old  legend  is  that  early  in  the  fourth  century  the  bodies  of  these  three 
kings  were  discovered  and  moved  to  Constantinople  by  the  pious  Empress 
Helena.  Thence  they  found  their  way  to  Milan.  After  the  taking  of  Milan  by 
the  Emperor  Frederick  Barbarossa,  in  the  year  1162,  the  precious  relics  were 
granted  to  Reinaldus,  Archbishop  of  Cologne,  who  brought  them  to  that  city, 
which  proved  to  be  their  final  resting-place.  Cologne,  proud  of  the  honour, 
adopted  as  her  arms,  argent,  on  a  chief  gules,  three  royal  crowns  or. 

198 


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COLERAINE 


COLOGNE 


COLLEGE  OF  ARMS 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

COLOGNE,  Elector  and  Archbishop  of.  Quarterly:  i,  argent,  a  cross  sable  (for 
the  archbishopric  of  Cologne),  2,  gules,  a  horse  salient  argent  (Westphalia), 
3,  gules,  three  human  hearts,  two  and  one,  or  (for  Engern),  4,  azure,  an  eagle 
displayed  argent  (for  Arensberg). 

COLOMBO,  See  of  (Ceylon).  Argent,  a  passion  cross  entwined  by  a  snake  coiled 
in  base  proper,  on  a  chief  azure,  a  dove  volant  holding  in  its  beak  an  olive- 
branch,  all  proper. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

COLONIAL  ASSOCIATION.      Refer  to  North  American  Colonial  Association. 

COLUMBIA,  BRITISH.     Refer  to  British  Columbia. 

COLUMBIA  See  of  (Canada).  (Woodward  says  hereafter  to  be  called  Vancouver.) 
Argent,  a  cross  pattce  quadrate  in  the  centre  gules,  a  chief  of  the  arms  of 
Burdett-Coutts  quarterly  viz.,  i  and  4,  argent,  a  stag's  head  erased  gules,  between 
the  attires  a  pheon  azure,  all  within  a  bordure  embattled  of  the  last  charged 
with  four  buckles  or  (Coutts),  2  and  3,  azure,  two  bars  or,  on  each  three  martlets 
gules  (Burdett). 

[Of  no  authority.] 

COLUMBIA,  REPUBLIC  OF.  Azure,  on  a  fesse  argent,  a  cap  of  liberty,  gules, 
in  chief  a  pomegranate  or,  seeded  gules  between  two  cornucopias  proper,  the 
base  a  landscape  showing  the  Isthmus  of  Panama  between  two  ships  in  full 
sail  in  the  sea  all  proper. 

[An  earlier  coat  was  decreed,  4th  October  1821,  as  follows:  "Two  cornucopias 
filled  with  the  fruits  of  the  frigid,  temperate,  and  torrid  districts,  surrounding  the 
Columbian  fasces,  which  shall  be  composed  of  a  bundle  of  lances,  and  the  battle- 
axe  placed  sideways,  bows  and  arrows  crossed  in  the  centre,  and  tied  below  with 
a  tri-coloured  ribbon."] 

COMB  MAKERS' COMPANY  (London).     (Incorporated  4th  April  1636.)    Azure, 
a  lion  passant  guardant  between  three  combs  or.     Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  a  mount,  thereon  an  elephant  standing  against  a  tree  all  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

COMMISSIONERS  OF  REVENUE  (Ireland),     (Grant  of  a  seal.)     In  a  scutcheon 
a  ship  proper,  in  a  chief  a  harp  between  two  anchors  with  this  circumscription — 
"The  Scale  of  the  Commissioners  of  the  Revenue  of  Ireland." 
Granted  by  St  George,  Ulster,  May  24,  1670. 

COMMONWEALTH  OF  AUSTRALIA.     Refer  to  Australia. 


COLOMBO,  SEE  OF 


COLUMBIA,  SEE  OF 


COLUMBIA 


TPE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CONGLETON  (Cheshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  following  are,  how- 
ever, claimed  and  used  : — "  Sable,  a  chevron  between  three  tuns  argent."  Crest 
— Upon  water  proper  and  between  two  lucies  or  (.'  conger-eels)  haurient  and 
issuant  therefrom  a  tun  floating  proper,  thereon  a  lion  statant  guardant  gules. 
Motto — "  Sit  tibi  sancta  cohors  comitum."  The  colours  of  the  shield  are  also 
quoted  vice  versa.  The  Crest  is  the  design  taken  bodily  from  the  older  seal 
belonging  to  the  Borough.  The  seal  itself  is  of  brass,  and  is  supposed  to  date 
from  the  thirteenth  century.  The  Town-Clerk,  in  a  most  courteous  letter, 
informs  me  that  an  impression  of  the  seal  is  attached  to  the  first  charter  {circa 
1286)  by  Henry  de  Lacy,  Earl  of  Chester,  as  Commissary  of  King  Henry  HI. 
Another  seal  of  a  later  date  (1624)  shows  a  rose  surmounted  by  a  Royal  Crown 
between  the  letters  l.R.     This  is  of  silver. 

CONGO  STATE.  Azure,  a  fesse  argent,  in  the  dexter  chief  point  a  mullet  of  five 
points  or,  an  inescutcheon  sable,  charged  with  a  lion  rampant  or.  Supporters 
— Two  lions  regardant  or.     Motto — "  Travail  et  progress." 

CONNAUGHT,  Province  of  (Ireland).  Per  pale  argent  and  azure,  on  the  dexter 
a  dimidiated  eagle  displayed  sable,  and  on  the  sinister  conjoined  therewith  at 
the  shoulder  a  sinister  arm  embowed  proper  ;  sleeved  of  the  first,  holding  a  sword 
erect  also  proper. 

[Recorded  in  Ulster's  Office.] 

CONNECTICUT,  U.S.A.  (State  Device).  A  shield  charged  with  three  trees 
from  mounts  on  the  dexter  side,  war  trophies,  and  on  the  sinister  the  emblems 
of  justice  ;  behind  the  escocheon  an  explosion.     Motto — "Qui  trans  sust." 

CONNOR.     Refer  to  Down  and  Connor,  and  Dromore,  Bishop  of 


CONNAUGHT,  PROVINCE  OF 


CONGLETON 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CONSTABLE.  Refer  to  Aberdeen,  Constable  of,  Lord  High  Constable  of 
England,  and  Lord  High  Constable  of  Scotland. 

CpNSTANCE,  Bishopric  of.     Gules,  a  cross  argent. 

CONWAY  (Carnarvonshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  a 
castle  triple-towered  issuing  from  water.  The  legend  is  "  Sij.  Provestri  e  de 
Conewey." 

COOKS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  nth  July  1482.) 
Argent,  a  chevron  engrailed  gules  between  three  columbines  proper,  stalked  and 
leaved  vert.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  mount  vert,  thereon  a  cock 
pheasant  proper.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  buck  proper,  attired  or,  (sinister)  a  hind 
proper,  each  pierced  in  the  shoulder  with  an  arrow  or.  Motto — "  Vulnerati  non 
victi." 

[Granted  by  Sir  Gilbert  Dethick,  6th  September  1557.] 

COOKS,  COMPANY  OF  (Dublin)  (Guild  of  St  James).  Sable,  three  escallops 
argent  on  a  chief  or,  a  mullet  between  two  fleurs-de-lis  gules.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  or  and  sable  a  sea-lyon  parted  per  fess  gules  and  vert,  holding  an  escallop 
argent  in  the  paws.  Supported  on  the  dexter  side  with  a  lyon  per  fesse  sable 
and  argent  charged  on  the  shoulder  with  a  mullet  or,  thereon  a  pellet  surmounted 
with  another  mullet  argent,  armed  and  langued  gules,  for  the  sinister  side  a 
stag,  party  per  fess  undee  sable  and  argent  charged  on  the  shoulder  with  a 
flower  de  luce  or,  armed  and  unguled  or.     Motto — "  God  maintain  our  rights." 

[Arms  confirmed  and  crest   and   supporters  granted  by  Thomas  Preston, 
Ulster,  circa  1639.] 


204 


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COOKS,  COMPANY  OF  (LONDON) 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

COOPERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  29th  April  1501.) 
Gyronny  of  eight  gules  and  sable,  on  a  chevron  between  three  annulets  or, 
a  royne  (a  grose)  between  two  broad -axes  azure,  a  chief  vert,  thereon  three 
lilies  argent.  Crest— On  a  wreath  or  and  azure,  a  demi-heathcock,  the  body 
azure,  sem(^^e  of  annulets  gold,  the  wings  argent,  semee  of  annulets,  sable,  holding 
in  the  beak  a  lily  silver  slipped  and  leaved  vert.  Supporters— Ty^o  camels  gules, 
bridled  or,  semee  of  annulets  of  the  last.  Motto—''  Love  as  brethren."  Mantling— 
Azure  doubled  argent.     (Ancient  motto,  "  Laude  Maria  Virgo.") 

[Granted     12th     October     1509.       Grant    printed    in     Frith's    "Historical 
Memoranda  of  the  Coopers'  Company."     Re-exemplified,  College  of  Arms,  24th 
February  1909.] 

COOPERS  (Aberdeen).      Refer  to  Wrights  and  Coopers. 

COOPERS'  COMPANY  (Chester)  used  the  same  arms  as  the  Coopers'  Company  of 
London. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

COOPERS  (Durham).     Refer  to  Carpenters.  , 

COOPERS.     Refer  to  Stornoway,  Incorporated  Trades  of. 

COOPERS  AND  HELLYARS,  Company  of  (Exeter).     (Incorporated  1566.) 

Gyronny  of  eight  gules  and  sable,  on  a  chevron   argent,  a  grose  or  drawing- 
board  between  two   adzes   of  the  second,   on   a  chief  of  the   third,  three  lilies 
slipped  and  leaved  azure.     Motto — "  Qui  fulget  molam  fugit  farinam." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

COPENHAGEN  (Denmark).  Argent,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert,  a  tower,  and  in  the 
gateway  thereof  a  man  in  armour  brandishing  a  sword  all  proper,  the  tower  sur- 
mounted by  an  increscent  or,  the  whole  between  two  smaller  towers  also  proper, 
each  surmounted  by  a  star  or.     Supporters — Two  lions  or. 

CORBRIDGE  (Northumberland).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Upon  the  seal  of 
the  County  Council  of  Northumberland  the  following  are  displayed  as  those 
appertaining  to  Corbridge  ...  a  cross  flory  .  .  .  between  four  human  heads 
couped  at  the  neck  and  facing  each  other. 

CORDINERS,  Incorporated  Trade  (Edinburgh).  Azure,  a  cutting-knife  proper 
ensigned  with  a  marquis's  coronet  or. 

[Not  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register — Refer  snh  Edinburgh.] 

CORDNERS.     Refer  to  Cordiners. 

CORDOVA  (Spain).  Argent,  a  lion  rampant  gules,  armed,  langued  and  pierced 
through  the  body  by  an  arrow  in  bend  sinister,  point  upwards,  azure. 

3o6 


COOPERS,  COMPANY  OF  (LONDON) 


bra^:>' 


CORDOVA 


COPENHAGEN 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
CORDWAINERS.     Refer  to  Cordiners. 

CORDWAINERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  26th 
April  1439.)  Azure,  a  chevron  or,  between  three  goats'  heads  erased  argent, 
attired  of  the  second.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  goat's  head  erased 
argent,  attired  or. 

[Granted  25th  June  1579.     Grant  printed  "Misc.  Gen.  et  Her.,"  i.  242.] 

CORDWAINERS' COMPANY  (Exeter).     (Incorporated  1387.)     Used  the  same 
arms  as  the  Cordwainers  of  London.     Molto—"  Vi  nulla  invertitur  ordo." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

COREA,  See  of.  Gules,  sem^  of  leaves,  a  cross  moHne  or,  all  within  a  bordure 
wavy  argent. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

CORFE  CASTLE  (Dorsertshire).  Rerry  says  : — "  Hath  not  any  armorial  ensign. 
The  seal,  which  is  very  ancient,  is  on  a  ground  diapered  with  martlets  and 
fleurs-de-lis,  a  castle  with  two  towers,  surmounted  with  a  tower  in  the  centre, 
over  each  tower  an  ostrich  feather." 

CORK,  County  of.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

CORK,  City  of  (Co.  Cork).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in  Ulster's  Office. 
Those  attributed  to  the  city  and  generally  used  are — Or,  on  waves  of  the  sea 
a  ship  of  three  masts  in  full  sail  proper,  between  two  towers  gules,  upon  rocks, 
also  proper.  Motto — "  Statio  bene  fide  carinis."  Burke,  in  his  "  General 
Armory,"  blazons  the  coat  "  Or,  an  ancient  ship  between  two  castles  in  fesse 
gules." 

CORK,  See  of  Argent,  a  cross  patt^e  gules,  charged  with  a  crozier  in  pale,  enfiled 
with  a  mitre  labelled  or. 

[This  coat,  which  is  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office,  remains  in  use,  but  through 
the  disestablishment  of  the  Irish  Church  it  is  really  extinct,  and  its  present  use 
is  illegal.] 

CORK,  CLOYNE,  and  ROSS,  Bishop  of.  According  to  Crockford  only  the  arms 
of  the  See  of  Cork  are  made  use  of,  but  Woodward  combines  them,  putting  Cork 
in  chief  and  Cloyne  in  base. 

CORK.      Refer  to  Queen's  College,  Cork. 


208 


CORDWAINERS 


COREA,  SEE  OF 


CORK,  CITY  OF 


CORK,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CORNWALL.    Sable,  fifteen  bezants,  five,  four,  three,  two,  and  one.    Motto — "  One 
and  all." 

These  arms  are  recorded  in  the  Heralds'  College  as  the  arms  of  the 
Duchy  of  Cornwall.  The  seal  of  the  County  Council  also  displays  them.  Many 
derivations  and  meanings  have  been  hung  on  the  foregoing,  and  Planchd  (in 
his  "  Pursuivant  of  Arms "),  who  was  seldom  at  fault,  gives  the  following 
explanation. 

"  But  to  begin  with  the  Golden  Roundel,  which  is  called  a  Bezant,  from  a 
coin  of  Byzantium  or  Constantinople,  whence  the  popular  conclusion  that  this 
charge  was  introduced  into  Armory  during  the  Crusades,  although  its  being 
called  after  something  it  resembled,  does  not  quite  prove  the  source  of  its 
adoption,  as  it  was  sometimes  called  a  Talent,  from  the  coin  of  that  name. 
Upton  blazons  the  arms  of  the  Duke  of  Cornwall  with  a  '  bordure  de  sable 
Talentee.'  The  border  Bezantee  or  Talentee  of  Richard  King  of  the  Romans 
also  is  no  representation  of  coins,  but  of  Peas  (Poix),  being  the  arms  of  Poitiers 
or  Poictou  (Menestrier,  Orig.  p.  147),  of  which  he  was  Earl,  and  not  of  his  other 
Earldom  of  Cornwall,  as  imagined  by  Sandford  and  others.  The  adoption  of 
the  Bezants  as  the  arms  of  Cornwall,  and  by  so  many  Cornish  families  on  that 
account,  are  all  subsequent  assumptions,  derived  from  the  arms  of  Earl  Richard 
aforesaid,  the  Peas  having  been  promoted  into  Bezants  by  being  gilt,  and  become 
identified  with  the  Cornish  Escutcheon,  as  the  Garbs  of  Blundeville  are  with  that 
of  Chester,  or  the  coat  of  Cantelupe  with  that  of  the  See  of  Hereford.  It  has 
been  pointed  out  to  me  that  the  arms  of  Poitiers  given  by  Menestrier  refer  to 
the  family  of  that  name,  and  not  to  the  city  or  the  province  of  Poictou.  This  ■ 
was  not  apparent  in  the  edition  I  possess.  But,  conceding  this  point,  I  still 
adhere  to  my  poix,  as,  with  the  exception  of  Edmond,  son  of  Richard,  Earl  of 
Cornwall,  who  bore  the  whole  arms  of  his  father,  I  do  not  find  the  Earls  of 
Cornwall,  who  were  not  Earls  of  Poictou,  bearing  bezants  in  any  way.  John  of 
Eltham,  Earl  of  Cornwall,  as  the  son  of  Edward  H.,  might  prefer  to  bear 
England  with  a  border  of  France  ;  but  the  arrogant  favourite  Piers  Gaveston, 
Earl  of  Cornwall,  who  we  might  naturally  suppose  would  have  gloried  in  the 
display  of  the  ancient  coat  of  his  earldom,  presents  us  only  with  three  or  six 
eagles.  The  fact  of  roundlets  being  borne  by  the  family  of  Poitiers  is  still 
valuable  as  collateral  evidence,  if,  on  the  other  side,  we  are  to  attach  any 
importance  to  the  bearing  of  bezants  by  Cornish  families,  the  family  of 
Cornwall  continue  to  bear  the  arms  of  the  Earl  of  Poictou,  from  whom  they  are 
illegimately  descended  ;  and  therefore  that  coat  cannot  be  brought  in  support  of 
one  opinion  more  than  the  other.  Otho,  Earl  of  Poictou,  it  is  said,  has  only  a 
lion  on  his  shield  ;  but,  then,  Otho  was  the  son  of  Henry  the  Lion,  of  Brunswick, 
and  that  was  his  paternal  coat.  We  have  no  proof  that  he  bore  it  as  the  arms 
of  his  earldom." 

Another  explanation,  which  figured  in  a  letter  to  the  Western  Morning 
News,  is  as  follows  : — 

"  In  the  days  of  the  earlier  Plantagenets  the  pawnbrokers  of  Cornwall  were 
the  most  enterprising  and  prosperous  merchants  in  all   England.     When   King 

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THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

John  desired  to  hypothecate  his  crown  jewels  to  raise  money  for  a  war  in  France, 
5  of  the  principal  '  uncles '  of  Cornwall — Ben  Levi,  of  Truro  ;  Ben  Ezra,  of 
Penzance;  Moses,  of  Mevagissey  (the  other  two  names  are  illegible,  see 
Manuscript  CXLIX.,  British  Museum) — formed  an  association,  the  Ancient  and 
Hon.  Association  of  Pawnbrokers,  to  take  over  his  debts.  The  '  trade-mark ' 
of  the  company  was  fifteen  balls  (the  three  balls  of  the  five  merchants  united 
into  one  bunch),  with  the  motto  '  One  and  All '  to  indicate  that  no  business 
could  be  arranged  without  a  quorum  of  all  five  members. 

"When  Edward  I.  ascended  the  throne  this  association  was  the  most 
powerful  in  Cornwall.  That  Prince,  following  out  his  usual  policy  of  exalting 
the  merchant  class,  chose  the  trade-mark  of  the  Ancient  and  Honourable 
Association  of  Pawnbrokers  to  be  the  coat-of-arms  of  the  county  of  Cornwall. 

"  Further  information  on  the  subject  will  be  found  in  '  An  Ancyent  and 
Ynterestyng  Account  of  Ye  Cornish  Arms,'  of  which  there  is  a  copy  in  the 
British  Museum." 

CORPORATION  OF  ACCOUNTANTS  OF  AUSTRALIA.  Refer  to  Account- 
ants. 

CORPUS  CHRISTI  COLLEGE  (Cambridge).  (Founded  in  1351,  by  the  Alder- 
men and  Guild  of  Cambridge.)  Qrly.  i  and  4,  gules,  a  pelican  in  her  piety 
argent,  vulning  her  breast  proper,  2  and  3,  azure,  three  lilies  argent,  two 
and  one. 

[Granted  23rd  December  1570,  College  of  Arms.] 

CORPUS  CHRISTI  COLLEGE  (Oxford).  (Founded  15 16,  by  Richard  Fox, 
successively  Bishop  of  Exeter,  Bath  and  Wells,  Durham,  and  Winchester,  and 
Lord  Privy  Seal  to  Kings  Henry  VH.  and  VIII.) 

The  escocheon  divided  into  three  parts  paleways,  the  centre  division 
argent,  thereon  an  escocheon  charged  with  the  arms  of  the  See  of  Winchester 
ensigned  with  a  mitre,  all  proper,  the  dexter  side  azure,  a  pelican  with  wings 
endorsed  feeding  her  young  or,  vulning  her  breast  gules,  being  the  arms  of 
Richard  Fox  ;  on  the  sinister  side  the  arms  of  Hugh  Oldham,  Bishop  of  Exeter, 
viz.,  sable,  a  chevron  or,  between  three  owls  argent,  on  a  chief  of  the  second 
as  many  roses  gules. 

[Recorded  in   College  of  Arms  at  the  Visitation  of  the  County  of  Oxford. 
1574.     As  to  the  division  of  the  shield  refer  to  note,  sub  Brazenose  College.] 

CORSICA.     Argent,  a  Moor's  head  couped  in  profile  proper. 

[The  above  as  the  arms  of  Corsica  were  granted  as  an  augmentation  to  Lord 

Minto.] 

COUPAR.     See  Cupar. 

COUPAR-ANGUS  (Forfarshire).      Has  no  arms,  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 


212 


CORPUS  CHRISTI  COLLEGE  (CAMB.)  CORPUS  CHRISTI  COLLEGE  (OXFORD) 


CORSICA 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

COVE  AND  KILCREGGAN.      Has  no  arms.     Those  in  use  are  argent,  a  repre- 
sentation of  the  Public  Hall  of  the  Burgh,  on  a  chief  azure  an  eagle  displayed 
between  two  ancient  Norse  galleys.     Crest — An  eagle's  head  erased.     Alotto — 
"Aquila  non  captat  muscas." 
[Quite  bogus.] 

COVENTRY  (Warwickshire).  Party  per  pale  gules  and  vert,  an  elephant 
statant  and  on  his  back  a  castle  triple-towered  and  domed  both  or.  Crest— A 
leopard  (or  is  it  a  cat  ?)  statant  guardant  proper.  Recorded  in  the  College  of 
Arms.  A  Motto  is  sometimes  used — namely,  "  Camera  Principis."  For  some 
reason  this  coat  seems  always  to  be  drawn,  and  frequently  to  be  quoted,  with 
the  elephant  standing  on  a  mount  proper. 

COWBRIDGE  (Glamorganshire).  Party  per  chevron  gules  and  argent,  in  chief 
semee  of  cross  crosslets  and  two  lions  rampant  of  the  last,  and  in  base  over 
water  a  bridge  and  three  arches,  thereon  a  cow  passant  all  proper.  Crest — A 
cow  proper,  holding  in  the  mouth  an  ear  of  wheat  leaved  and  slipped  gold,  and 
supporting  with  the  dexter  forefoot  an  escocheon  or,  charged  with  three 
chevronels  invected  gules.  Motto — "  Awn  rhagom." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  April  7,  188S.] 

COWDENBEATH  (Fifeshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings. 
The  seal  represents  the  buildings  at  the  mouth  of  a  pit,  and  has  the  legend 
"  the  Seal  of  the  Burgh  of  Cowdenbeath." 

CRACOW  (Galicia — Austria).  Azure,  a  battlemented  wall  surmounted  by  three 
towers  gules,  porte  ouverte,  portcullis  raised  or,  and  in  the  gateway  an  eagle 
displayed  argent,  crowned  or,  in  chief  an  Imperial  crown  proper. 

CRACOW  (as  borne  in  the  Ecu  Complet  of  Austria  as  established  by  Imperial 
Decree,  1836).  Gules,  an  eagle  displayed  argent,  armed,  crowned,  and  with 
"  Klee  Stengel  "  or. 

CRAIL  (Fifeshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The  seal 
represents  upon  waves  of  the  sea  an  ancient  vessel  of  one  mast,  the  sail  furled, 
and  in  chief  stars  and  a  crescent.  The  legend  is  "  Sigillum  commune  burgi  de 
Karale." 

CREDITON,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 


214 


COWBRIDGE 


COVENTRY 


h\   A    M    h\    /\    M/A    /•>    A 


I.I.   I.    I 


1. T.I.I 


CRACOW 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CREWE  (Cheshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  "  picture  "  in  use  is  another 
of  these  "  Illustrated  Bits,"  absurdities  which  pass  the  wit  of  man  to  understand. 
Whoever  was  responsible  for  its  concoction  and  conception  has  raised  up  a 
lasting  memorial  to  his  own  ignorance,  to  put  it  mildly  ;  and  that  any  Cor- 
poration composed  of  a  Mayor,  Aldermen,  and  Councillors  should  contain  no 
one  with  sufficient  heraldic  knowledge  (and  very  little  would  have  sufficed),  or 
even  artistic  taste,  which  is  a  much  more  general  commodity,  to  have  objected 
when  such  a  design  was  submitted  is  difficult  to  believe.  The  said  design 
consists  of  an  escutcheon  cjuarterly  of  four.  As  the  Town-Clerk,  in  writing, 
guilelessly  puts  it,  the  design  of  Crewe  "  represents  the  present  and  past  means 
of  locomotion,  one  panel  (!)  representing  the  stage-coach,  another  the  canal- 
boat,  another  the  pack-horse,  and  the  last  the  pillion  ;  and  a  locomotive  steam- 
engine  at  the  head."  The  illustration  is  a  very  accurate  representation,  and  to  sum 
it  up,  I  should  like  to  say  the  shield  contains  seven  horses,  ten  men,  one  woman, 
a  stage-coach,  and  a  canal-boat,  a  canal,  a  towing-path,  a  road,  two  ranges  of 
mountains,  four  trees,  and  incidental  surroundings.  A  few  of  the  people  are 
omitted  on  the  notepaper,  presumably  for  the  sake  of  convenience.  Above  the 
shield  is  placed  a  mural  coronet  in  the  position  of  a  coronet  of  rank  (!  ! !)  [I 
have  taken  upon  myself  to  omit  the  coronet. — Ed.]  And  above  this  is  placed 
upon  a  wreath  showing  nine  twists  a  locomotive  engine  and  tender !  (Upon  the 
notepaper  a  line  of  rails  is  placed,  which  causes  the  absence  of  a  signal-post  to 
be  noticed.)  The  Motto  is  "never  behind."  This,  as  a  delightful  piece  of 
sarcasm,  will  doubtless  be  appreciated  by  any  one  constantly  using  Crewe 
Railway  Station.  One  eagerly  awaits  new  quarters  for  the  motor-car  and 
aeroplane. 

CRIEFF  (Perthshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  I  quote  the  following  de- 
scription of  the  seal  from  a  newspaper  cutting.  The  seal  is  supposed  to  be 
emblematic  of  historic  scenes  in  the  district.  In  pre-historic  times  the  Earls 
of  Strathearn — scions  of  the  Royal  Family — had  their  stronghold  or  castle 
situated  on  Tomachastel,  a  conical  hill  some  three  miles  west  of  Crieff,  and  on 
which  now  stands  Sir  David  Baird's  monument,  a  conspicuous  object  in  the 
valley  of  the  Earn.  Singularly  enough,  too,  the  title  is  still  held  by  one  of 
Royal  Family  of  Great  Britain,  the  Duke  of  Connaught  and  Strathtarn.  The 
Earls  of  Strathearn,  who  flourished  in  the  twelfth  and  thirteenth  centuries, 
were  succeeded  by  the  Stewards  of  Strathearn,  and  they  held  courts  in  a  field 
about  a  mile  south  from  the  town,  now  part  of  the  estate  of  Broich.  Down  till 
the  beginning  of  the  present  century  the  "  stayt  "  or  "  skeat  "  where  the  Court 
was  held  was  about  twelve  yards  in  diameter,  with  the  centre  raised,  on  which 
the  Earls  or  Chief  Judges  sat.  In  1850  the  then  Laird  of  Broich  demolished 
the  "  stayt."  The  seal  represents  the  Earl  sitting  on  the  mound  dispensing 
justice.  On  his  left  is  the  Cross  of  Crieff,  also  a  pre-historic  relic.  In  the 
foreground  are  the  Crieff  iron  stocks  or  pillory,  which  are  still  seen  at  the  door 
of  the  Court-House. 

216 


CREWE 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
CROATIA.     Chequy  argent  and  gules. 

CROMARTY  (Co.  Ross  and  Cromarty).     Has  no  arms.     Those   in    use  are  Or, 
three  boars'  heads  erased.     Motto — "  Mean  weil,  speak  weil  and  doe  weil." 
[Of  no  authority,  being  the  arms  of  Urquhart  of  Cromarty.] 

CROMARTYSHIRE.     Has  no  armorial  bearings.     Refer  to  Ross  and  Cromarty. 

CROMARTY  (Cromartyshire).     Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings. 

/  CRONSTADT  (Russia).     Refer  to  Kronstadt. 

CROYDON  (Surrey).  Quarterly  argent  and  or,  a  cross  parted  and  fretted  gules, 
between  three  Cornish  choughs  proper  in  the  first  quarter,  as  many  crosses 
pattee  fitchee  sable  in  the  second,  a  cross  flory  azure  charged  with  three  bezants 
fessewise  in  the  third  and  a  fesse  embattled  of  the  third  in  the  fourth.  And  for 
the  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours  upon  a  mount  vert,  a  crosier  fessewise  or, 
thereon  a  fountain  in  front  of  a  tilting-spear  in  bend,  surmounting  a  sword  in 
bend  sinister,  the  whole  between  two  tufts  of  rye-glass  proper,  banded  gold. 
Motto — "  Sanitate  Crescamus." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  August  lo,  1886.] 

CROYDON,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

■   CUBA.     Refer  to  Illustration. 

CULLEN  (Banffshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The  seal 
represents  the  Virgin  standing  on  a  kind  of  throne  and  holding  the  infant  Jesus  ; 
and  below  is  a  dog.  The  legend  is  "  Sigillum  urbis  de  Cullen."  Many  cor- 
porate seals  exhibits  a  great  crudeness  in  the  design  and  in  the  engraving,  but 
in  the  opinion  of  the  editor  the  seal  of  Cullen  is  far  and  away  the  most 
lamentable. 

CULROSS  (Perthshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The  seal 
represents  a  church  (Cat.  of  Her.  Exn.  says  that  of  St  Serf),  in  the  doorway  of 
which  is  standing  a  figure  with  hands  clasped  in  prayer :  above  the  doorway 
upon  an  escrol  being  the  inscription  "  S.  Servanus."  The  legend  is  "  Sigillum 
commune  burgi  de  Culros." 

CUMANIA.  Argent,  a  lion  rampant  gules,  in  the  dexter  chief  a  crescent,  in  the 
sinister  an  estoile,  both  argent. 


218 


CROATIA 


CROMARTY 


CUMANIA 


CROYDON 


THE   BOOK   OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CUMBERLAND.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Some  design  suggested  by  the 
supposed  arms  of  Carlisle  is  usually  made  use  of. 

CUMNOCK  (Ayrshire).  Has  no  arms,  and  its  seal  which  is  not  heraldic,  is  a  repre- 
sentation of  the  Market  Cross. 

CUPAR  or  CUPAR-FIFE  (Fifeshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bear- 
ings. Three  seals  all  bearing  slightly  different  achievements  have  come  under 
the  editor's  notice.  As  to  the  arms,  it  is  an  open  question  whether  the  field 
be  gules  or  whether  it  be  or.  The  charges  seem  to  be  always  shown  as  three 
wreaths  of  laurel,  but  one  seal  adds  a  double  tressure  flory  and  counterflory. 
There  does  not  appear  to  be  any  variation  as  to  the  Crest,  "  a  lion  rampant,"  or 
as  to  the  Motto,  "  Unitas,"  but  one  of  the  seals  shows  as  supporters  on  either 
side  of  the  escutcheon  an  angel,  the  two  interior  wings  being  crossed  in  saltire 
above  the  escutclieon,  and  each  holding  in  their  exterior  hands  a  palm-branch. 

CURRIERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  30th  April 
1606).  Azure,  a  cross  engrailed  or,  between  four  pairs  of  currier's  shaves  in 
saltire  argent,  handled  of  the  second.  Mantle — Gules,  double  argent.  Crest — On 
the  wreath  of  the  colours,  two  arms  embowed  proper,  vested  to  the  elbows  argent 
issuing  from  clouds  of  the  first,  holding  in  the  hands  a  shave  as  in  the  arms. 
Supporters — (Dexter)  an  elk  proper,  attired  and  unguled  or,  (sinister)  a  goat 
argent,  armed  and  unguled  or.  Motto — "  Spes  nostra  Deus." 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.     Misc.  Gts.,  i.  115  b.\ 


CURRIERS,  COMPANY  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

CURSITOR'S   INN   (London).     Gules,  on  a  chief  argent,  two   mullets  sable,  a 
bordure  compony  (or  cheeky)  or  and  azure. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

CUTLERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  1415.)  Gules, 
three  pairs  of  swords  in  saltire  argent,  pommels  and  hilts  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath 
of  the  colours,  an  elephant  argent,  armed  or,  bearing  a  castle  or,  the  trappings 
and  girths  argent,  with  two  pennons  displayed  from  the  castle  gules.  Supporters 
— Two  elephants  or.     Motto — "  Pour  parvenir  a  bonne  foy." 

[The  arms  with  the  crest  "  on  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  an  elephant's  head 
couped  gules,  armed  or,"  were  granted  by  Thomas  Holme,  Clarenceux,  1476.] 

CUTLERS'  COMPANY  (Sheffield).  (Incorporated  by  Act  of  Parliament, 
24  Jas.  I.,  c.  31.)  Argent,  on  a  fess  indented  vert,  between  three  pairs  of 
swords  ill  saltire  proper,  pommels  and  hilts  sable,  eight  arrows  interlaced 
saltirewise  banded  of  the  field  between  two  garbs  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of 
the  colours,  in  front  of  an  elephant's  head  couped  or,  two  swords  in  saltire  as 
in  the  arms.  Motto — "  Pour  y  parvenir  a  bon  foi." 
[Granted  College  of  Arms.] 

CUTLERS,  PAYNTER-STAYNERS,  AND  STATIONERS,  Guild  of 
(Dublin).  Quarterly  three  coats  :  i,  gules,  two  swords  in  saltire  prope.p  between 
four  cross  crosslets  fitchee  or  ,  2,  party  per  chevron  or  and  azure,  three  eagles' 
heads  erased  counter-changed  ;  3,  party  per  chevron  azure  and  argent  between 
three  Bibles  proper,  in  chief  a  dove  with  wings  expanded  argent ;  fourth  as  first ; 
over  all  an  inescutcheon  party  per  pale  azure  and  gules  a  harp  or.  Crest — On  a 
helm  and  wreath  of  their  "  cullers  "  a  phcenix  in  flames  proper.  Supported  on 
each  side  with  St  Luke  and  St  Peter  with  this  Motto— ''W\s  unita  valet." 
[Gtd.  by  Richard  St  George,  Ulster,  April  13,  167 1.] 

CYPRUS.  Although  Cyprus  is  administered  by  the  United  Kingdom  it  is  really 
part  of  the  Ottoman  Empire,  and  no  power  exists  in  this  country  to  assign  arms 
to  it.  But  the  Admiralty  publish  for  use  by  the  High  Commissioner  of  Cyprus 
upon  the  Union  Flag  a  white  disc  showing  two  lions  passant  guardant  in  pale 
gules. 


222 


CURSITOR'S  INN 


CUTLERS'  COMPANY  (SHEFFIELD) 


CUTLERS,  COMPANY  OF  (LONDON) 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

DAILUAINE  GLENLIVET  DISTILLERY,  LIMITED.  Or,  a  lion  rampant 
gules,  on  a  chief  of  the  last,  three  ears  of  barley  slipped,  conjoined  on  one  stalk, 
between  two  antique  crowns  of  the  first,  and  in  an  Escrol  under  the  shield 
this  motto — "  Dulce  et  utile." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  1896.] 

DALBEATTIE  (Kirkcudbrightshire).  Has  no  arms.  Those  in  use  are  those  of 
the  old  Earls  of  Nithsdale,  viz.,  Argent,  an  eagle  with  two  heads  displayed 
sable,  beaked  and  membercd  gules  ;  on  the  breast  an  escutcheon  charged  with  a 
saltire  sa.,  surcharged  with  an  urcheon,  between  in  chief  a  tree,  and  in  the  flanks 
and  base  a  mullet.  Crest — A  stag  lodged  under  a  holly  bush.  Motto — "  Respice 
prospice." 

[Of  no  authority.] 

DALKEITH  (Edinburghshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings. 
Those  in  use  are.  Quarterly:  i,  the  arms  of  Graham  (or,  on  a  chief  sable, 
three  escallops) ;  2,  the  arms  of  Douglas  (argent,  a  man's  heart  imperially 
crowned  all  proper,  on  a  chief  azure  three  mullets  of  the  field) ;  3,  the  arms  of 
Scott  (or,  on  a  bend  azure,  a  star  of  six  points  between  three  crescents  of  the 
field);  4,  a  representation  of  the  old  Church  of  Dalkeith,  over  all  on  an 
inescutcheon  a  representation  of  the  Palace  of  Dalkeith  with  two  crowns  in 
chief.  Supporters — Two  armour-clad  warriors  each  holding  a  Lochaber  axe. 
Motto — "  Olim  custodes  semper  defensores." 

[This  coat  about  i860  was  selected  after  public  competition  by  the  local 
Volunteers,  then  the  Town  Trustees  "jumped"  it,  so  did  the  Police  Commis- 
sioners, and  now  the  Burgh  has  appropriated  it,  and  from  beginning  to  end  it  is 
bogus  and  nobody  has  a  right  to  it.     What  a  place  Dalkeith  must  be.] 

DALMATIA.      Azure,  three  leopards'  faces  crowned  or. 

DANIEL  STEWART'S  COLLEGE  (Edinburgh).     Refer  to  Stewart's  College. 

DANZIG  (Prussia).  Gules,  two  crosses  pattee  in  pale  argent,  in  chief  an  open 
crown  or. 


224 


DAILUAINE 


DALBEATTIE 


DALMATIA 


DANZIG 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

DARLINGTON  (Durham).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Debrett's  "  House  of 
Commons  "  gives  argent,  on  a  chevron  gules,  between  a  representation  of  the 
"  Rocket  "  locomotive  attached  to  a  tender  and  railway  waggon  in  chief  and  a 
bull's  head  cabossed  in  base,  three  bales  of  cotton  (?).  Crest — A  dexter  hand 
couped  below  the  wrist  holding  a  pickaxe  in  bend  sinister.  Motto — "  Floreat 
industria." 

DARMSTADT  (Germany).  Per  fesse  gules  and  azure,  on  a  fesse  sable  between 
a  demi-lion  rampant  issuing  from  the  fesse  in  chief  or,  and  a  fleur-de-lis  argent 
in  base,  a  plate. 

DARTMOUTH  (Devonshire).  (Gules),  the  base  barry  wavy  (argent  and  azure), 
thereon  the  hulk  of  a  ship,  in  the  centre  of  which  is  a  king  robed  and  crowned 
and  holding  in  his  sinister  hand  a  sceptre,  at  each  end  of  the  ship  a  lion  sejant 
guardant  (all  or). 

The  entry  made  at  the  visitation  and  retained  in  the  College  shows  no 
tinctures,  but  the  foregoing  are  believed  to  be  correct.  The  design  upon  the 
present  seal  is  somewhat  different  and  more  in  accordance  with  the  arms  as 
quoted  in  Burke's  "  General  Armory " — namely.  Gules  the  base  wavy  of  six 
argent  and  azure,  thereon  the  hulk  of  a  ship,  in  the  centre  of  which  sits  a  man 
representing  a  king  in  the  robes  of  majesty,  crowned  with  an  open  coronet,  in  his 
dexter  hand  a  sceptre,  in  his  sinister  a  mound,  on  each  side  a  lion  rampant 
guardant  resting  their  forefeet  on  the  shoulders  of  the  king,  all  or.  Berry  adds 
this  note: — "  This  seems  to  be  the  fancy  of  some  painter,  formed  on  an  inspec- 
tion of  the  Corporation  Seal,  wh.  is  very  ancient,  and  represents  the  hulk  of 
a  ship  on  waves ;  in  the  centre  of  the  vessel  a  bust  of  a  man,  vested  over  the 
shoulder,  and  cro)vned  with  an  antique  coronet;  on  the  dexter  side  in  chief  a 
crescent,  on  the  sinister  a  mullet  of  six  .points  ;  on  each  side  the  bust  of  a 
demi-lion  issuing  from  the  dexter  and  sinister  sides  of  the  seal,  and  resting  his 
forelegs  on  the  vessel.  The  legend  round  the  seal,  Sigillum  Commune  de 
Cliftone  Dartemuthe." 

DARVEL.  Has  no  arms.  Those  on  the  seal  are  azure,  a  spindle  and  a  shuttle 
paleways  in  fesse,  on  a  chief  argent,  an  ancient  lamp.  Motto — "  Non  sibi  sed 
cunctis." 

[Home-made,  and  of  no  authority.] 

DARWEN,  OVER  (Lancashire).  Or,  a  fesse  wavy  with  cottices  also  wavy  azure, 
between  three  sprigs  of  the  cotton-tree  slipped  and  fructed  proper.  And  for 
the  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours  in  front  of  a  demi-miner  habited  proper, 
holding  over  his  shoulder  a  pick  or,  a  shuttle  fessewise  of  the  last,  thread  pendent 
proper.     Motto — "  Absque  labore  nihil." 

Granted,  College  of  Arms,  August  7,  1S78. 


226 


DARMSTADT 


DARLINGTON 


DARTMOUTH 


i^ 


-::>J 


DARWEN 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

DAVENTRY  (Northamptonshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  repre- 
sents a  man  standing  upon  a  mount  between  the  figures  15  and  95,  holding  over 
his  dexter  shoulder  an  axe,  and  in  his  sinister  hand  one  of  the  branches  of  a 
tree  growing  out  of  the  mound.  The  legend  upon  the  seal  which  has  been  sent 
to  me  is  "  Sigillum  commune  burgi  de  Danetre.  N.S."  Burke  and  Berry  quote 
spellings  of  the  legend  both  differing  from  the  foregoing  and  from  each  other. 

DAVID'S,  ST.     See  St  David's. 

DEAL  (Kent).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  party  per  pale,  three 
demi-lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  conjoined  to  as  many  hulks  of  ships.  (Refer 
to  the  Cinque  Ports.)  On  the  Corporation  notepaper  there  is  the  same  achieve- 
ment used  as  a  coat-of-arms,  with  the  colours  shown  as  follows : — Per  pale  gules 
and  azure  three  demi-lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  conjoined  to  as  many 
hulks  of  ships  argent.  The  Corporation  also  use  as  a  crest  two  towers  placed 
immediately  upon  or  issuing  from  the  top  of  the  shield.  The  editor  would 
suggest  that  if  the  said  towers  were  placed  upon  a  wreath  (see  illustration)  it 
would  be  more  in  accord  with  the  laws  of  heraldry,  and  if  the  Corporation  would 
obtain  a  grant  of  arms  in  the  proper  manner  it  would  be  better  still. 

DEAN  AND  FACULTY  OF  ADVOCATES.  Refer  to  Advocates,  Dean  and 
Faculty  of. 

DEFENCE,  Masters  of.     Gules,  a  sword  pendent  argent. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

DELAMERE,  Forest  of.  (Quartered  by  Done,  of  Utkinton,  as  the  foresters 
thereof.)     Argent,  a  buglehorn  sable. 

DELAWARE,  U.S.A.  (State  Device).  A  .shield,  a  fesse  wavy,  in  chief  a  wheat- 
sheaf  and  hank  of  flax  in  bend  counter-bend,  and  in  base  upon  a  mount  an 
ox  :  supported  on  the  dexter  side  by  a  husbandman,  the  right  hand  supporting  a 
hoe,  and  pointing  to  the  ox,  and  holding  in  the  left  over  the  arms,  on  a  wreath, 
the  crest,  viz.  a  ship  in  full  sail  towards  the  sinister ;  the  shield  supported  on  the 
sinister  side  by  the  right  hand  of  a  man  in  a  rural  dress,  holding  a  gun  in  the 
left,  with  a  bugle  powder-flask  and  pouch,  slung  from  the  shoulder,  and  pendent 
on  the  right  side.  Motto — "Liberty  and  Independence."  The  sea,  ships,  and 
highland  in  perspective. 

DELMENHORST.     Refer  to  Denmark. 

DENBIGHSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  County  Council 
shows  a  lion  rampant  within  the  legend  "Seal  of  the  Denbighshire  County 
Council.     Duw  a  digon." 


228 


DEAL 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

DENBIGH  (Denbighshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  upon  a 
mount  acastleof  three  tiers,  the  two  towers  upon  each  of  the  lower  tiers  being  each 
surmounted  by  a  spire  of  the  fane,  and  in  thegateway  of  the  castle  being  a  leopard's 
face  jessant-de-lis.  Upon  a  smaller  mount  in  front  of  that  upon  which  is  the 
castle  is  a  greyhound  couchant,  and  upon  either  side  of  the  castle  is  an  escutcheon 
each  surmounted  by  a  plume  of  three  ostrich  feathers  issuing  from  a  ducal 
coronet,  that  on  the  dexter  bearing  the  arms  of  France  and  England  quarterly, 
and  that  on  the  sinister  being  charged  with  a  lion  rampant.  The  legend  is 
"Sigillum  cummunitatis  burgi  de  Denbigh." 

DENMARK,  Kingdom  of.  Quarterly  of  four  principal  quarters,  i,  or,  semee  of 
hearts  gules,  three  lions  passant  in  pale  azure,  ducally  crowned  or  (for  Denmark) ; 
2,  or,  two  lions  passant  in  pale  azure  (for  Sondergylland-Slesvig);  3.  per  fesse  the 
chief  azure,  three  crowns  or  (for  Scandinavia — refer  to  Sweden) ;  the  base  com- 
posed of  three  coats,  namely,  on  the  dexter  side,  gules  a  stockfish  (or  dried  cod) 
argent  crowned  or  (for  Iceland) ;  on  the  sinister  side,  in  chief  azure,  a  ram  statant 
argent  (for  the  Faroe  Islands);  and  in  base  azure,  a  bear  sejant  erect  argent 
(for  Greenland) ;  4,  per  fesse,  in  chief  or,  a  lion  passant  in  chief  azure,  the  base 
sem^e  of  hearts  gules  (for  Gothland);  and  in  base  gules,  a  wyvern  passant  and 
crowned  or  (for  Vandalia) ;  over  the  four  grand  quarters  separating  them  the 
cross  of  the  Dannebrog,  i.e.  a  cross  pattee  throughout  argent,  fimbriated  gules  ;  on 
the  centre  an  escutcheon  of  four  coats,  namely,  i.  gules,  an  inescutcheon  per 
fesse  argent  and  of  the  field,  between  three  passion  nails  in  pairle  points  towards 
the  centre,  and  as  many  demi-nettle-leaves  also  argent  (for  Holstein) ;  ii.  gules,  a 
swan  with  wings  elevated  argent,  ducally  gorged  gules  (for  Stormarn)  ;  iii.  gules, 
a  cavalier  on  horseback,  holding  in  his  dexter  hand  a  sword  (for  Ditmarsken) ; 
iiii.  gules,  a  horse's  head  couped  or  (for  Lauenborg) ;  and  over  all  an  in- 
escutcheon of  the  family  arms  of  the  Counts  of  Oldenborg  ;  namely  or,  two  bars 
gules  (for  Oldenborg) ;  impaling  azure,  a  cross  pattee  alesee  or  (for  Delmenhorst). 
Supporters — On  either  side,  a  savage  wreathed  about  the  head  and  waist  with  ivy, 
and  each  holding  in  the  hand  a  club,  the  great  end  resting  .upon  the  ground. 
Motto — "  Dominus  mihi  adjutor." 

[The  full  coat  as  above  is  usually  made  use  of,  but  sometimes  the  first  quarter 
only  is  used,  with  or  without  the  supporters.] 

DENNY  and  DUNIPACE  (Co.  Stirling).  Has  no  arms,  and  its  seal,  though 
fearful  and  wonderful,  is  not  heraldic. 

DENSTONE    COLLEGE.     Uses   the    arms    of  the    see    of    Lichfield.     Motto— 
"  Lignum  crucis  arbor  scientiE." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

DEPTFORD,  Borough  of  (London).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 


230 


DENMARK 


THE  BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

DERBYSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  in  use  for  a  long  time  have 
been  "  Argent  a  rose  (?  gules)  regally  crowned  (?  or),"  and  these  (with  lettering 
enough  to  stock  a  type-founder)  now  appear  upon  the  seal  of  the  County  Council. 
Berry  quoted  them  in  his  "Dictionary  of  Heraldry,"  but  as  "Argent,  a  treble 
rose  regally  crowned  between  the  letters  A  and  R."  Occasionally  the  arms 
attributed  to  the  town  of  Derby  (argent,  on  a  mount  vert,  a  stag  lodged  within 
park-pales  and  gate,  all  proper)  have  been  used  for  the  County. 

DERBY  (Derbyshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  usually  quoted  and  in 
general  use  are  "  Argent,  on  a  mount  vert,  a  stag  lodged  all  within  park-pales 
and  a  gate,  all  proper."  The  seal,  which  is  very  ancient,  simply  represents  a  stag 
as  lodged  in  a  wood. 

DERBY,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan  lie  has  no  official  arms. 

DERBY  SCHOOL     Quarterly:    t  and  4  the  arms  of  the  town  of  Derby.  2  and  3 
the  arms  of  the  see  of  Lichfield.     Motto — "  Vita  hominis  sine  literis  mors  est." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

DERRY.     See  Londonderry. 

DERRY,  See  of.  Ancient — Argent,  a  church  proper  (another,  confirmed  by 
D.  Mulleneux,  Ulster,  24th  May  161 3).  Gules,  three  mitres  or,  the  labels 
argent.  Modern — Gules,  two  swords  in  saltire  proper  pommelled  and  hilted 
gold,  on  a  chief  azure  an  Irish  harp  gold  stringed  argent.  [Confirmed  by 
Carney,  Ulster,  c.  1690.] 

[The  modern  coat  remains  in  use,  but  through  the  disestablishment  of  the 
Irish  Church  it  is  really  extinct  and  its  present  use  is  illegal.] 

DERRY  AND  RAPHOE,  Bishop  of  According  to  Crockford  the  arms  in  use 
are  per  pale  (dexter)  the  modern  arms  of  the  See  of  Derry  (to  which  refer), 
sinister,  the  arms  of  the  See  of  Raphoe  (to  which  refer).  There  is  no  authority 
for  such  usage. 

DEVIZES  (Wiltshire).  Party  per  pale  gules  and  azure,  a  castle  in  perspective,  the 
whole  forming  a  hexagon,  the  front  triple-towered,  and  the  two  outer  towers 
domed  all  or,  each  dome  surmounted  by  an  estoile  sable. 

Recorded  in  the  Visitation  Books  at  the  College  of  Arms. 

DEVONPORT  (Devonshire).  Per  fesse  azure  and  argent,  in  chief  a  naval  crown 
encircled  by  two  branches  of  oak  in  saltire  slipped  or,  and  in  base  a  ship  in  frame 
proper,  and  for  the  Crest — On  a  naval  crown  or,  an  anchor  between  two  dolphins 
haurient  heads  downwards  and  respecting  each  other  proper.  Motto — "  Prorsum 
semper  honeste." 

Granted  6th  November  1876. 


232 


DERBY 


DERRY,  SEE  OF 


DEVIZES 


DEVONPORT 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

DEVONSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  of  the  city  of  Exeter  have 
been  usually  pressed  into  the  service.  The  seal  of  the  County  Council  of  Devon 
shows  three  escutcheons :  I.  of  Exeter,  namely,  Party  per  pale  gules  and  sable, 
a  triangular  castle  or;  II.  of  Lord  Clinton,  Lord  Lieutenant  of  the  County  and 
Chairman  of  the  County  Council,  namely,  quarterly  i  and  4  argent  a  chevron 
between  three  spindles  sable  (for  Trefusis) ;  2  azure,  three  bears'  heads  couped 
close  argent,  muzzled  gules,  and  in  chief  a  cross  pattee  (for  Forbes) ;  3  or,  a  bend 
gules,  surmounted  of  a  fesse  chequy  azure  and  argent,  in  chief  a  crescent  of  the 
third,  a  canton  ermine  (for  Stuart);  III.  of  the  Earl  of  Morley,  Vice-Chairman 
of  the  County  Council,  namely,  sable,  a  stag's  head  caboshed  within  two  flaunches 
argent.  The  legend  is  "  The  Common  Seal  of  the  County  Council  of  Devon, 
1889." 

DEWSBURY  (Yorkshire).     Chequy  or  and  azure,  on  a  chief  engrailed  sable,  a 
cross  patonce  of  the  first,  between  two  owls  argent.     Crest — In  front  of  a  cross 
patonce  fitchee  azure,  an  owl  argent.     Motto — "  Deus  noster  refugium  et  virtus." 
Granted,  College  of  Arms,  24th  February  1893. 

The  chequy  field  is  derived  from  the  arms  of  the  ancient  Earls  of  Warren, 
and  the  owls  from  the  achievement  of  the  Savile  family. 

DIJON  (France).  Per  fesse,  the  base  gules,  the  chief  per  pale,  dexter  azure 
seme-de-lis  or,  abordure,  compony  argent  and  gules,  the  sinister  or,  three  bends 
azure,  a  bordure  gules. 

DINDINGS.     Refer  to  Straits  Settlements. 

DINGWALL,  Royal  Burgh  of.  Azure,  the  sun  in  his  splendour  between  five 
mullets  or. 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  1897.] 


«34 


DEWSBURY 


DIJON 


DINGWALL 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

DISTILLERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  9th  August 
1638.)  Azure,  a  fesse  wavy  argent,  in  chief  the  sun  in  splendour,  encircled  with 
a  cloud  distilling  drops  of  rain  all  proper,  in  base  a  distillatory  double  armed 
or,  on  a  fire  proper  with  two  worms  and  bolt  receivers  of  the  second.  Crest- 
On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  garb  of  barley  environed  with  a  vine  fructed  both 
proper.  Supporters — (Dexter)  the  figure  of  a  man  representing  a  Russian  habited 
in  a  long  robe  azure,  collar  light  blue,  vested  gules  garnished  and  pommel  of 
sword  or,  stockings  also  or,  turned  up  azure,  breeches  yellow,  cap  gules,  turned 
up  argent,  (sinister)  an  Indian  proper  vested  round  the  waist  with  feathers  gules 
and  vert,  wreathed  about  the  temples  with  feathers  as  the  last,  in  his  hand  a 
bow,  at  his  back  a  quiver  of  arrows  all  proper.  Motto — "  Drop  as  rain,  distil 
as  dew." 

[College  of  Arms.     Granted  by  Borough,  Garter  1639,  Misc.  Gts.,  iv.  8.] 

DISTILLERY.     Refer  to  Dailuaine  Glenlivet  Distillery,  Ltd. 

DITMARSKEN.     Refer  to  Denmark. 

DIVINITY  or  LOGIC  SCHOOL  (Cambridge).  Refer  to  Cambridge  University 
Regius  Professors. 

DOCTORS'  COMMONS,  or  College  of  the  Professors  of  Civil  and  Canon  Law. 

Gules,  on  a  bend  argent,  three  trefoils  slipped  vert,  all  within  a  bordure  of  the 
third. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

DOLLAR.     Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 

DOLLAR  INSTITUTION  (Dollar).  Has  no  arms.  Those  in  use  are :  Azure,  a 
lymphad  sail  furled  ...  a  chief  per  pale  gules  and  or,  on  the  dexter  side  a 
hand  couped  at  the  wrist,  and  on  the  sinister  side  a  lion  rampant,  the  whole 
within  the  Royal  tressure.     Motto — "  Juventutis  veho  fortunas." 

DOMINICA.     Refer  to  Leeward  Islands. 

DOMINION  OF  CANADA.     Refer  to  Canada. 


236 


DISTILLERS,   COMPANY  OF 


DOCTORS'  COMMONS 


DOLLAR  INSTITUTION 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

DONCASTER  (Yorkshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  following  are  in 
general  use,  however,  and  are  given  in  Burke's  "  General  Armory  "  :  Gules,  a 
castle  with  loophole,  gateway  and  portcullis,  each  tower  surmounted  by  a 
cupola,  and  thereon  a  pennon  waving  argent,  in  chief  a  royal  crown  or.  Crest — 
(which  is  the  design  upon  the  Corporation  seal) — Upon  a  cushion  ermine,  a  lion 
sejant  erect  or,  supporting  between  his  forepaws  a  staff  argent,  thereon  a  banner 
azure,  fringed  and  tasselled  also  or,  charged  with  a  castle  as  in  the  arms, 
skirted  by  a  river  proper,  and  thereon  in  capital  letters  the  word  DoN.  Motto — 
"  Confort  et  Hesse."     (Burke  quotes  it  "  Son  confort  et  liesse.") 

DONEGAL,  County  of.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

DONEGAL  (Co.  Donegal).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

DORCHESTER  (Dorset).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  at  present  in  use 
represents  a  castle  triple-towered  upon  a  mount,  and  in  front  of  the  castle  an 
escutcheon  quarterly,  i  and  4  France  and  England  quarterly,  2  Scotland,  3 
Ireland.  The  legend  is,  "  The  Mayor,  Aldermen  and  Burgesses  of  Dorchester, 
Dorset,  1836."  The  ancient  seal,  confirmed  by  Hervy  Clarenceux  in  1565,  has 
the  shield  in  front  of  the  castle  quarterly  of  4,  viz.,  I  and  4  France  (ancient),  2  and 
3  England,  and  a  different  legend.  Burke,  in  his  "  General  Armory,"  quotes  this 
as  a  coat-of-arms,  making  the  field  gules  and  the  castle  argent,  masoned  sable 
upon  a  rock  proper. 

DORNOCH  (Sutherlandshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings. 
Those  occasionally  quoted  are  "  Argent  a  horse-shoe  azure,"  but  a  copy  of  the 
seal  is  more  generally  made  use  of  The  seal,  which  has  for  legend  simply  the 
word  "  Dornoch,"  represents  an  escutcheon,  and  thereon  within  a  horse-shoe  the 
arms,  crest,  and  motto  of  the  family  of  Sutherland — namely,  gules  three  mullets 
or.  Crest — A  mountain  cat  sejant  guardant.  Motto — "  Sans  peur."  The  follow- 
ing extract  is  taken  from  the  "  Ordnance  Gazetteer  of  Scotland  "  : — "  Close  outside 
the  town,  says  Worsaae,  there  stands  the  Earl's  Cross,  a  stone  pillar  in  an  open 
field,  which  is  simply  the  remains  of  one  of  those  market  crosses  so  often 
erected  in  pre-Reformation  times.  As  a  matter  of  course,  the  arms  of  the  Earls 
of  Sutherland  are  carved  on  one  side  of  the  stone,  and  on  the  other  are  the 
arms  of  the  town — a  horse-shoe.  Tradition,  however,  will  have  it  that  the  pillar 
was  reared  in  memory  of  a  battle  fought  towards  the  middle  of  the  thirteenth 
century  by  an  Earl  of  Sutherland  against  the  Danes.  In  the  heat  of  the  fray, 
while  the  Earl  was  engaged  in  hand-to-hand  combat  with  the  Danish  chief,  his 
sword  broke  ;  but  in  this  desperate  strait,  he  was  lucky  enough  to  lay  hold  of 
a  horse-shoe  (the  whole  leg  of  a  horse,  say  some)  that  accidentally  lay  near  him, 
with  which  he  succeeded  in  killing  his  antagonist.  The  horse-shoe  is  said  to 
have  been  adopted  in  the  arms  of  the  town  in  memory  of  the  feat;  and  the 
name  Dornoch  is  popularly  derived  from  the  Gaelic  dorn-eich,  a  horse's  hoof, 
though  dor-n-ach,  '  field  between  two  waters,'  is  a  far  more  probable  etymon." 

238 


DONCASTER 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

DORSET,  County  of.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  It  is  usually  credited  with  some 
design  taken  with  varying  accuracy  from  the  seal  of  Dorchester,  but  the  seal  of 
the  County  Council  e.vhibits  (without  tinctures)  three  lions  passant  gardant  in 
pale.     These  are  probably  suggested  by  the  old  seal  of  Melcome  Regis. 

DORTMUND  (Germany).     Argent,  an  eagle  displayed  sable,  armed  gules. 

DOUGLAS  (Isle  of  Man).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  A  view  of  the  Tower  of 
Refuge  in  Douglas  Bay  frequently  does  duty. 

DOUNE.      Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 

DOVER  (Kent).  [Argent]  St  Martin  on  horseback  with  a  beggar  [all  proper],  a 
bordure  [gules]  sem6  of  lions  [passant  guardant  or]. 

At  the  Visitation  of  Kent  in  1574,  the  entry  relating  to  Dover  runs  :  "  The 
Armes  of  the  Towne  and  Port  of  Dover  Incorporate  by  the  name  of  the 
'Mayor  and  Jurates'  in  the  tyme  of  Edward  III."  Then  follow  sketches 
described  as  "  The  comon  Seale  of  the  Towne  and  Port  of  Dover"  (a  representa- 
tion of  St  Martin  on  horseback  issuing  from  a  city  gate,  together  with  a  beggar 
and  all  within  a  circular  border  seme  of  lions  guardant  passant  and  counter- 
passant),  "the  reverse  of  the  said  comon  seal"  (a  ship  at  sea,  etc.)  and  "The 
Mayor's  Seal,"  which  has  the  arms  showing  three  dimidiated  lions  passant 
guardant,  and  hulks  of  ships  which  seem  to  be  in  use  in  the  Cinque  Ports. 

The  fact  that  the  Visitation  entry  begins  "  the  armes  "  places  their  status 
beyond  doubt,  and  this  is  confirmed  by  an  ancient  MS.  book  in  the  College 
of  Arms  (not,  however,  an  official  record)  which  gives  the  arms  of  Dover  as  the 
device  of  St  Martin  and  the  beggar  with  a  bordure  seme  of  lions.  In  this, 
however,  the  castellated  gateway  is  omitted. 

DOVER,  Bishop  of     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

DOWN,  County.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  following,  however,  have 
been  lately  invented  for,  and  in  the  neighbourhood,  namely,  "  Per  fesse  vert  and 
azure,  on  a  fesse  between  two  spinning-wheels  in  chief  or,  and  a  ship  of  three 
masts  in  full  sail  upon  the  sea  in  base,  a  garb  between  two  weaver's  shuttles 
fesseways  proper."     Motto — "  Industria." 

DOWN  AND  CONNOR,  See  of.  Azure,  two  keys  indorsed  in  saltire  or,  suppressed 
by  a  lamb  in  fesse  argent. 

[This  coat,  which  is  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office  and  also  in  the  College  of 
Arms,  remains  in  use,  but  through  the  disestablishment  of  the  Irish  Church  it  is 
really  extinct  and  its  present  use  is  illegal.] 

DOWN  AND  CONNOR  AND  DROMORE,  Bishop  of  According  to  Crock- 
ford  only  the  arms  of  Down  and  Connor  (to  which  refer)  are  made  use  of, 
but  according  to  Woodward  this  coat  is  usually  quartered  with  the  arms  of  the 
See  of  Dromore, 

240 


DORTMUND 


DOVER 


COUNTY  DOWN 


POWN  AND  CONNOR,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

DOWNING  COLLEGE  (Cambridge).     (Founded  in  1800  under  the  will,  dated 
1 7 17,  of  Sir  George  Downing,  Bt.,  K.B.,  of  Gamlingay.)     Barry  of  eight  argent 
and  vert,  a  griffin  segreant  or,  within  a  bordure  azure,  charged  with  eight  roses  of 
the  first,  seeded  and  barbed  proper.     Motto — "  Quaerere  verum." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  i8th  April  1801.] 

DOWNPATRICK  (Co.  Down).  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  but  occasionally  makes 
use  of  those  quoted  for  Co.  Down.  They  are  placed  over  the  Record  Court  in 
the  County  Court  House  at  Downpatrick. 

DRAPERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  15th  July  1364.) 
Azure,  three  clouds  proper,  radiated  in  base  or,  each  surmounted  with  a  triple 
crown  or,  caps  gules.  Crest — On  the  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  mount  vert,  thereon 
a  ram  couchant  or,  armed  sable.  Supporters — Two  lions  argent,  pellette.  Motto 
— "  Unto  God  only  be  Honour  and  Glory." 

[Arms  granted  by  Sir  William  Bridges,  Garter,  1439.  Crest  and  Supporters 
granted  by  William  Hervey,  1590;  some  alterations  made  by  Sir  William 
Segar,  Garter,  in  1614,  and  the  whole  approved  and  entered  at  the  Visitation  of 
the  City  of  London  by  Henry  St  George,  1634.] 

DRAPERS  AND  TAYLORS,  Company  of  f  Durham).  The  banner  of  St  Cuthbert 
with  the  arms  of  the  Company  of  Merchant  Taylors  and  Drapers  of  the  City  of 
London. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

DRESDEN  (Saxony).  Per  pale,  the  dexter,  or  a  lion  rampant  sable,  the  sinister 
pal}'  of  six  sable  and  or. 

DRESSERS.     See  Dyers  and  Dressers  sub  Stornoway,  Incorporated  Trades  of. 


242 


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DRESDEN 


DOWNING  COLLEGE 


DRAPERS,  COMPANY  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
DROGHEDA,  County.     See  Louth  and  Drogheda. 

DROGHEDA  (Co.  Louth).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  In  Burke's  "General 
Armory  "  the  following  are  quoted: — "  Az.,  per  pale  dimidiated,  on  the  dexter 
side  three  lions  pass,  guard,  in  pale  or,  on  the  sinister  as  many  hulls  of 
ships  in  pale  of  the  last,  surmounted  by  a  castle  with  two  towers  triple-towered 
argent.  N.B. — The  small  seal  of  Drogheda  exhibits  on  the  shield  az.  three 
crescents  issuant  therefrom  as  many  ectoiles  all  ar."  But  the  armorial  bear- 
ings as  they  appear  to  be  used  and  as  they  are  quoted  in  the  Dublin  Penny 
Magazine,  4th  May,  1833,  are  azure  (upon  a  mount)  an  embattled  gateway  of  two 
towers  argent,  portcullis  sable,  surmounted  by  pennons  gules,  on  the  dexter  three 
lions  of  England  issuant  or,  on  the  sinister  appearing  to  sail  behind  the  gate,  a 
ship  having  St  George's  ensign  displayed  over  her  stern.  Crest — On  a  wreath 
a  star  within  the  horns  of  a  crescent  argent.  Motto — "  Deus  presidium  mercatura 
decus." 

DROITWICH  (Worcestershire).  Gules,  a  sword  of  state  paleways  point  down- 
wards proper,  hilt  and  pommel  or,  surmounted  of  two  lions  passant  of  the  last, 
impaling  quarterly  i  and  4  chequy  argent  and  sable  2  and  3  gules  two  .  .  . 
(Berry  and  Burke  both  blazon  them  barrows)  in  pale  argent.  Recorded  in  the 
College  of  Arms  at  the  Visitation  of  Worcester,  1634.  Berry  adds  a  note  that 
originally  the  arms  of  the  town  were  the  two  last  coats  quarterly. 

DROMORE,  See  of  Argent,  sem^e  of  trefoils  slipped  vert,  a  cross  patt^e  gules,  on 
a  chief  azure,  the  sun  in  splendour.  Another  coat,  argent  two  keys  in  saltire  the 
wards  in  chief  gules,  surmounted  by  an  open  book  in  fesse  proper  between  two 
crosses  pattee  fitchce  in  pale  sable. 

[Both  these  coats  are  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office,  but  through  the  disestab- 
lishment of  the  Irish  Church  they  are  really  extinct,  and  their  present  use  is 
illegal.] 

DROMORE.     Refer  to  Down  and  Connor  and  Dromore,  Bishop  of 

■  DRONTHEIM  (Norway).     Refer  to  Trondheim. 


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DROMORE,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

DUBLIN,  City  of.  Azure,  three  castles  argent,  flammant  proper.  Supportcrs^On 
either  side  a  female  figure  proper,  vested  gules,  lined  or,  that  on  the  dexter  side 
holding  in  her  exterior  hand  a  sword  erect  proper,  pommel  and  hilt  or,  and  that 
on  the  sinister  a  pair  of  scales,  and  each  holding  in  her  interior  hand  a  branch  of 
laurel.     Motto. — "  Obedientia  civium  urbis  felicitas." 

[Recorded  in  Ulster's  Office  Visitation  of  Dublin,  1607.] 
The  dexter  figure   typifies  "Law,"  and  the  sinister  "Justice."     The  arms 
are  almost  invariably  surmounted  by  the  fur  cap  of  office  (worn  by  the  sword- 
bearer),  and  behind  the  shield  are  usually  placed   in  saltire  the  sword  and  mace 
of  the  city. 

DUBLIN,  Archbishopric  of.  Azure,  an  episcopal  staff  ensigned  with  a  cross  pattee 
or,  surmounted  by  a  pall  argent,  edged  and  fringed  gold,  charged  with  five 
crosses  formee  fitchee  sable. 

[This  coat,  which  is  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office  and  also  in  the  College  of 
Arms,  remains  in  use,  but  through  the  disestablishment  of  the  Irish  Church  it  is 
really  extinct,  and  its  present  use  is  illegal.] 

DUBLIN,    COLLEGE  OF  PHYSICIANS.     Refer  to  Physicians. 

DUBLIN,  County  of     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

DUBLIN,  University  of.  Refer  to  University  of  Dublin  and  refer  to  University 
College. 

DUBLIN,  Trading  Corporations.  Refer  to  Barber-Surgeons,  Blacksmiths, 
Brewers,  Bricklayers  and  Plasterers,  Butchers,  Cooks,  Cutlers,  Paynter  Stayners 
and  Stationers,  Goldsmiths,  Merchants'  Guild,  Taylors. 

DUDLEY  (Worcestershire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Debrett's  "  House  of 
Commons  "  gives  an  illustration  of  the  following,  which  appear  upon  the  seal : — 
"  Gules  on  a  fesse  engrailed  argent  between  in  chief  a  representation  of  Dudley 
Castle,  and  in  base  a  salamander  in  flames,  a  basket  of  coals  (?  a  lump  of  iron 
ore  or  ?  a  fleur-de  lis,  or  .''  a  trilobite)  between,  on  the  dexter  side  an  anchor,  and 
on  the  sinister  side  a  miner's  safety  lamp."     Crest — A  lion's  head. 


246 


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DUDLEY 


DUBLIN,  ARCHBISHOPRIC  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

DUFFTOWN  (Banffshire).  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  has  on  an  escutcheon  a 
representation  of  the  tower  in  the  centre  of  the  Town  Square. 

DUKINFIELD,  Borough  of  (Cheshire).  Quarterly  azure  and  argent,  a  cross 
pointed  and  voided  quarterly  of  the  last  and  sable,  between  in  the  first  quarter  a 
raven  close,  and  in  the  fourth  a  garb,  both  or.  Crest — Out  of  a  crown  palisade  or, 
a  cubit  arm  vested  azure,  cuffed  argent,  the  hand  proper,  holding  an  escutcheon 
of  the  second  charged  with  the  sun  in  his  splendour  of  the  first,  between  two 
ostrich  feathers  of  the  third. — Motto —  "  Integrity." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  24th  March  1900.] 

These  arms  are  based  on  those  of  the  Dukinfield  family,  and  a  "docken  "  is 
a  local  name  for  a  raven. 

DULWICH  COLLEGE  (Dulwich,  London).  Argent,  a  chevron  between  three 
cinquefoils  gules. 

[These  are  the  arms  of  Alleyne,  the  founder  of  the  school,  but  the  school 
has  no  authority  for  their  use.] 

DUMBARTONSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  elephant  from  the  arms 
of  the  town  of  Dumbarton  appears,  however,  to  have  been  placed  upon  a  wreath 
and  used  as  a  crest  below  the  town  motto. 

DUMBARTON  (Dumbartonshire).  The  entry  in  Lyon  Register  is  as  follows: — 
"  The  Royall  Burgh  of  Dumbritaine  gives  for  Ensignes  Arnioriall  azuy  ane  eliphant 
passant  argent,  tusked  or,  bearing  on  his  back  a  tower  proper.  The  Motto  in  ane 
escroU  is  fortitudo  et  fidelitas." 

DUMFRIESSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  County  Council 
exhibits  two  escutcheons — i.  Gules  an  orle  argent  (being  the  arms  attributed  to 
John  Balioll) ;  and  2.  Argent,  a  saltire  and  a  chief  gules  (being  those  intended 
for  Robert  Bruce) — above  is  an  open  crown  and  below  is  a  heart  gules. 

DUMFRIES  (Dumfriesshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The 
seal  represents  the  figure  of  a  saint  mitred,  a  wing  attached  to  his  dexter 
shoulder  and  holding  in  his  sinister  hand  a  crosier  with  the  legend  "  Sigillum 
burgi  de  Dumfreis." 

The  following  blazon  has,  however,  been  supplied  to  the  editor  as  the  arms 
of  Dumfries: — "Argent,  the  Archangel  Michael  proper,  vested  in  long  garments 
azure,  in  his  dexter  hand  a  crosier,  on  his  head  a  mitre,  below  his  feet  a  serpent 
nowed  both  proper."  No  illustration  of  this  has  been  available,  and  as  the 
editor  is  not  familiar  with  St  Michael  in  this  disguise  he  must  be  excused  from 
any  emblazonment  thereof  The  "  Ordnance  Gazetteer  of  Scotland  "  simply 
gives  the  seal. 


248 


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DULWICH  COLLEGE 


DUMBARTON 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

DUNBAR  (Haddingtonshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The 
seal  represents  a  castle  triple-towered.  But  a  rather  different  design  from  this  is 
made  use  of. 

Burke,  in  his  "  General  Armory,"  blazons  this  as  a  coat-of-arms  as 
follows  : — "  Az.  a  castle  an  masoned  sa.,  windows  and  portcullis  closed  gu." 

DUNBLANE.     Refer  to  St  Andrews,  Dunkeld,  and  Dunblane,  Bishop  of. 

DUNBLANE  (Perthshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  design  upon  the 
burgh  seal  is  suggested  by  an  old  ecclesiastical  seal.  On  the  dexter  side  is  St 
Laurence,  and  on  the  sinister  side  is  a  bishop  (?  St  Blane),  mitred  and  robed,  his 
dexter  hand  raised  in  the  action  of  benediction,  and  his  sinister  holding  his 
crosier. 

DUNDALK  (Co.  Louth).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in  Ulster's  Office. 
Upon  a  sheet  of  Irish  arms  published  by  Messrs  Marcus  Ward  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  it 
is  credited  with  the  following : — "  Azure,  three  falcons  belled  or." 

DUNDEE  (Forfarshire).  The  entry  in  Lyon  Register  is  as  follows: — "The 
Royall  Burgh  of  Dundie  gives  for  Ensig7ies  Annoriall  azure  a  pott  of  growing 
lillies  argent.  The  escutcheon  being  supported  by  two  dragons  their  taills 
nowed  together  underneath  vert,  with  this  word  in  ane  escroU  above  a  lillie 
growing  out  of  the  top  of  the  shield  as  the  former.     Dei  Doiium." 

Confirmed  to  the  Royal  Burgh  of  Dundee  by  Sir  Charles  Araskine  of  Cambo, 
Lyon  King  of  Arms,  30th  July  1673. 

The  deed  of  confirmation  is  still  in  the  possession  of  the  Corporation,  but  this 
has  no  painting  upon  it. 

The  blazon  as  in  the  Lyon  Register  shows  several  discrepancies.  In  the 
first  place,  the  supporters  are  termed  dragons,  whereas  they  are  always  repre- 
sented as  wyverns,  and  secondly  the  motto  also  is  quoted  "  Dei  Domum,"  whilst 
there  can  be  little  doubt  that  it  is  intended  for  Dei  Donum,  and  as  no  official 
painting  accompanies  the  blazon  in  the  records,  it  is  doubtful  in  what  manner 
the  crest  is  intended  to  be  used.  The  usual  method  of  depicting  it  is  issuing  from 
a  wreath  in  the  ordinary  manner  as  shown  in  the  plate. 

A  second  motto,  "  Prudentia  et  candore,"  appears  to  be  frequently  made  use 
of  below  the  arms,  but,  so  far  as  the  editor  is  aware,  without  any  authority. 

DUNEDIN,  (New  Zealand),  See  of.  Gules,  St  Andrew  bearing  his  cross  before 
him  proper,  on  a  canton  azure  three  estoiles,  each  of  eight  points  argent,  one  and 
two. 

[Of  no  authority.] 


250 


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DUNEDIN,  SEE  OF 


DUNDEE 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

DUNFERMLINE,  ROYAL  BURGH  OF  (Fifeshire).  Azure,  on  a  rock  proper 
two  lions  supporting  a  tower  with  four  steps  argent,  masoned  sable,  windows 
and  portcullis  gules,  and  in  an  Escrol  over  the  same  this  Alotto — "  Esto  rupes 
inaccessa." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  May  12,  1909.] 

DUNGANNON  Co.  (Tyrone).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  a 
castle,  and  rising  from  the  battlements  thereof  another.  Below  is  the  date 
of  1760. 

DUNGARVAN  (Co.  Waterford).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in  Ulster's 
Office.  The  "  Common  Seal  of  the  advisers  of  Dungarvan  "  represents  a  number 
of  figures,  five  of  whom  are  crowned,  around  a  table  upon  which  are  a  number 
of  maps,  within  an  Irish  motto  (see  illustration  of  the  arms),  the  literal  translation 
of  which  is  "  Not  a  mariner  until  a  helmsman."  The  arms  in  use  at  the  present 
time  are,  however,  "  Argent,  on  waves  of  the  sea  a  two-masted  ship  sailing  to  the 
sinister  between  on  either  side  on  rocks  a  square  tower  all  proper."  Crest — An 
anchor  sans  beam,  entwined  by  a  dolphin  haurient  head  downwards,  all  proper. 
Supporters — On  the  dexter  side  a  warrior  vested  in  a  cloak  and  kilt,  in  his  belt 
a  sword,  in  his  dexter  hand  a  lance,  and  in  his  sinister  a  bow  unstrung.  On  the 
sinister  side  a  warrior  habited  in  knee-breeches  and  a  short  cloak,  his  dexter 
hand  supporting  a  battle-axe  head  downwards,  and  on  his  sinister  arm  a  shield. 
Motto,  in  ancient  Irish  characters,  for  which  see  illustration.  The  Town-Clerk, 
in  a  very  courteous  letter,  informs  me  that  the  arms  were  designed  (!  !  !)  about 
30  years  ago  after  a  very  exhaustive  search  had  failed  to  discover  the  least  trace 
of  any  insignia  which  had  belonged  to  or  been  used  by  the  ancient  and  extinct 
Corporation  of  Dungarvan. 

DUNHEVED.     See  Launceston. 

DUNKELD,   See   of   (Scotland).       Argent,  a  cross   calvary   sable,  between    two 
passion  nails  gules. 

[This  coat  is  given  in   Burke's  "  General  Armory,"  but  it  has  never  been 
matriculated  in  Lyon  Register.] 

DUNKELD.     Refer  to  St  Andrews,  Dunkeld,  and  Dunblane,  Bishop  of. 


252 


DUNFERMLINE 


DUNKELD,  SEE  OF 


''oS'i['i..V\?-. 


\ 


DUNGARVAN 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

DUNOON  (Argyllshire).     Has  no  arms.     The  seal  shows  a  shield  with  a  landscape 
design  of  a  rocky  headland,  a  castle,  the  sea,  and  an  excursion  steamer.     Motto 
— "  Forward." 
[Bogus.] 

DUNS  (Berwickshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  On  the  seal  is  a  shield  bearing 
a  castle  within  a  bordure.     Crest — An  arm  in  armour  enibowed  holding  a  sword. 

Motto—"  Invictu.s." 

DUNSTABLE  (Bedfordshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  at  present  in 
use  upon  the  seal  and  elsewhere  are  "  Argent  an  ale-warmer  .  .  .  within  a  bordure 
engrailed  sable."     Motto — "  Justitia  omnibus  fiet." 

DUNWICH  (Suffolk).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  a  ship  of 
three  masts  upon  the  waves,  the  mainmast  ensigned  with  a  flag  of  St  George,  the 
sails  furled,  the  other  two  masts  broken  off  at  the  round  top,  on  the  water  four 
fish  swimming  to  the  dexter. 

DURHAM  (County  Palatine  of).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Versions  and 
perversions  of  the  arms  of  the  city  or  of  the  See  of  Durham  have  been  variously 
made  use  of  The  seal  of  the  County  Council  has  favoured  and  displays  the 
latter,  namely,  "Azure,  a  cross  between  four  lions  rampant  or." 

DURHAM,  City  of  (Durham).     Sable,  a  cross  gules  fimbriated  argent. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

DURHAM,  University  of.     See  University  of  Durham. 

DURHAM,  See  of  Azure,  a  cross  or,  between  four  lions  rampant  argent.  [The 
mitre  over  the  arms  is  encircled  with  a  ducal  coronet.] 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

The  earliest  use  of  these  arms  was  by  Bishop  Robert  Nevili,  1438-57,  but  an 
older  form  of  the  arms  is  with  a  cross  patonce. 


254 


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DUNS 


DURHAM,  CITY  OF 


DURHAM,  SEE  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

DURHAM,  Church  of  (on  a  charter  under  the  hand  and  seal  of  John  Cosin, 
Bishop  of  Durham,  26th  April  1671).  Azure,  a  cross  patoncee  between  four 
lions  rampant  or. 

DURHAM,  Deanery  of  Azure  on  a  cross  or,  between  four  lions  rampant  argent, 
the  letter  D  sable. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

DURHAM,  Trading  Corporations.  Refer  to  Mercers;  Drapers  and  Taylors; 
Carpenters,  Joyners,  Coopers,  Wheelwrights,  and  Sawyers. 

DUSSELDORF  (Germany).  Argent,  a  lion  rampant  gules,  crowned  or,  support- 
ing an  anchor  azure. 

DYERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  i6th  February 
1471).  Sable,  a  chevron  engrailed  argent,  between  three  bags  of  madder  of 
the  last,  corded  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  several  (three)  sprigs  of 
the  grain-tree  erect  vert,  fructed  gules.  Stipporters — Two  leopards  (?  panthers) 
rampant  guardant  argent,  spotted  with  various  colours,  gules,  argent,  vert, 
purpure  and  sable,  fire  issuing  from  their  ears  and  mouth  proper,  both  ducally 
crowned  or.     Motto — "  Da  Gloriam  Deo." 

[Granted  by  Cooke,  Clarenceux,  1577.     Misc.  Gts.,  i.  55.] 


DYERS,  Company  of  (Chester).     Sable,  a  chevron  between  three  bags  of  madder 
:nt. 
[Of  no  authority.] 


argent. 


DYERS  AND  DRESSERS.     Refer  to  Stornoway,  Incorporated  Trades  of. 

DYSART  ( Fifeshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The  seal,  the 
workmanship  of  which  is  wretched,  represents  a  tree  eradicated,  within  the  legend 
"  Sigil.  de  Dysert."  The  "General  Armory,"  however,  blazons  this  as  a  coat-of- 
arms,  with  the  field  argent  and  the  tree  proper. 


256 


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DUSSELDORF 


\, 


DYERS,  COMPANY  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

EALING,  Borough  of  (Middlesex).  Party  per  chevron  gules  and  argent  in  chief, 
on  the  dexter  side  two  swords  in  saltire  points  upwards  proper,  pomels  and 
hilts  o^  and  on  the  sinister  side  three  seaxes  barwise  in  pale  of-^the  third, 
pomels  and  hilts  to  the  dexter  of  the  fourth,  in  base  an  oak-tree  fructed  and 
eradicated  also  of  the  third.  Motto — "  Respice,  prospice." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  22nd  February  1902.] 

EARL  MARISCHAL  OF  SCOTLAND,  Badge  of  Office.  Two  batons  gules, 
semee  of  thistles  or,  each  ensigncd  with  an  imperial  crown  or,  placed  saltirewise 
behind  his  arms. 

EARL  MARSHAL  AND  HEREDITARY  MARSHAL  OF  ENGLAND, 
Badge  of  Office.  Two  batons  of  gold  tipped  with  sable  in  saltire  behind  his 
arms. 

[A  deputy  Earl  Marshal  places  one  baton  as  above  in  bend  dexter  behind 
his  shield.] 

[Both  the  foregoing  are  recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

EARLSFERRY  (Fifeshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The 
seal  represents  an  ancient  one-masted  ship  in  full  sail  upon  the  sea  within  the 
legend  "  Sig.  comune  burgi  de  Earles  Ferri." 

EAST  AFRICA  PROTECTORATE.     No  warrant   assigning  arms  to  the  Pro- 
tectorate has  as  yet  been  issued,  but  the  following  arms  are  in  general  use : — 
"  Azure,  a  sun  in  splendour  and  in  chief  an  Imperial  crown  all  or." 

EAST  ANGLIA.     There  is  no  body  corporate  competent  to  bear  arms  or  to  whom 

arms  could  be  granted  or  assigned,  but  a  flag  has  been  invented  for  use  in 

the  Eastern  Counties  and  considerable  use  is  made  of  the  design.     This  flag  is — 

"  Argent,   a   cross   gules,   surmounted    by   an    Escutcheon    azure,  charged 

with  three  ducal  crowns  two  and  one  or." 

This  flag  is,  of  course,  quite  unauthorised. 


258 


EAST  AFRICA   PROTECTORATE 


EALING 


EAST  ANGLIA 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

EAST  EQUATORIAL  AFRICA,  See  of.  Sable  (?  gules)'  a  cross  patee  fitch^e 
argent,  on  a  chief  wavy  ermine,  a  tent  of  the  second  between  two  millrinds 
sable. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

EAST  GRINSTEAD  (Sussex).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents 
a  double  rose  imperially  crowned,  on  the  dexter  side  "  Sus,"  and  on  the 
sinister  "  Sex."  ' 

EAST  HAM,  Borough  of  (London).     Has  no  arms. 

EAST  INDIA  COLLEGE  (Haileybury,  Hertfordshire).  This  is  not  the  same 
foundation  as  the  present  Haileybury  College,  to  which  refer.  The  arms  of  the 
United  Company  of  Merchants  of  England  trading  to  the  East  Indies,  viz..  Argent, 
a  cross  gules,  on  a  shield  in  the  dexter  quarter,  the  arms  of  France  and  England 
quarterly  within  a  compartment  adorned  with  an  imperial  crown,  on  a  chief 
of  augmentation  azure,  an  olive -wreath  between  two  open  books  proper,  bound 
and  clasped  or.  Crest— On  a  wreath  argent  and  gules,  a  lion  rampant  guardant, 
on  his  head  an  Eastern  crown  or,  holding  between  the  forepaws  a  scroll  with 
a  seal  pendent  therefrom  proper.  Supporters — On  either  side  a  lion  guardant, 
on  the  head  an  Eastern  crown  or.  Motto — "  Auspicio  regis  et  senatus  Anglise." 
[Granted  by  Royal  Licence,  4th  December  1807.] 

EAST  INDIA  COMPANY.  (Incorporated  by  Queen  Elizabeth  in  1600.)  Azure, 
three  ships  of  three  masts,  rigged,  and  under  full  sail,  the  sails,  pennants,  and 
ensigns  argent,  each  charged  with  a  cross  gules,  on  a  chief  of  the  second  a  pale, 
quarterly,  azure  and  gules  in  the  ist  and  4th,  a  fleur-de-lis ;  in  the  2nd  and  3rd,  a 
lion  passant  guardant  all  of  the  second,  between  two  roses  gules  seeded  or,  barbed 
vert.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  sphere  without  a  frame,  bound  with 
the  zodiac  in  bend  or,  between  two  split  pennons  flotant  argent,  each  charged 
in  chief  with  a  cross  gules ;  over  the  sphere  these  words,  "  Deus  indicat." 
Supporters — Two  sea-lions  or,  the  tails  proper.  Motto—''  Deo  ducente  nil 
nocet." 

[The   shield    in   the   foregoing   arms    was   granted    by    William    Camden, 
Clarenceux,  4th  February  1600.] 

EAST  INDIA  COMPANY  (New).  (Established  by  Act  of  Tarliament  in  1698, 
and  united  with  the  former.)  Argent,  a  cross  gules  in  the  dexter  chief  quarter 
an  escutcheon  of  the  arms  of  France  and  England,  quarterly,  the  shield  orna- 
mented and  imperially  crowned  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  lion 
rampant  guardant  or,  supporting  between  the  forepaws  an  imperial  crown  proper. 
Stipporters — Two  lions  rampant  guardant  or,  each  supporting  a  banner  erect 
argent  charged  with  a  cross  gules.  Motto — "  Auspicio  regis  et  senatus  Angliae." 
[Granted  by  St  George,  Garter  King  of  Arms,  1698.] 


260 


f^^ 


EAST  EQUATORIAL  AFRICA,  SEE  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

EAST  LAND  COMPANY.  (Incorporated  tcvip.  Elizabeth  and  Charles  I.,  confirmed 
by  Charles  II.).  Or,  on  the  sea  in  base  a  ship  of  three  masts  in  full  sail  all  proper, 
the  sails,  pennants,  and  ensigns  argent  charged  with  a  cross  gules,  on  a  chief 
of  the  last  a  lion  passant  guardant  of  the  first.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  an  allocamelus,  or  ass-camel  proper.  Supporters — Two  bears  proper. 
Motto— •'  Despair  not." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

EAST  LINTON.     Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 

EAST  LOOE  (Cornwall).  Burke  says,  "Has  no  Armorial  Ensign.  The  Seal 
represents  an  antique  one-mast  vessel,  in  it  a  man  and  a  boy,  against  the  side 
of  the  hulk  three  escutcheons  each  charged  with  three  bends." 

EAST  RETFORD  (Nottinghamshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal, 
which  is  very  ancient  and  of  very  crude  workmanship,  represents,  to  quote 
Berry  and  Burke,  two  eagles  with  wings  inverted  and  endorsed,  the  inner  feet 
conjoined,  with  the  legend  "  Sigillu  de  Este  Rettfurthe  istut."  Berry  adds  a 
note — "  It  is  not  unlikely  that  the  charges  thereon  were  originally  assigned  to  the 
Corporation  as  Arms  .  .  .  the  colours  are  unknown."  Burke  adds  a  note — "  A 
rose  with  a  lion  of  England  upon  a  chief  is  engraved  as  the  Arms  of  this  town 
upon  some  of  the  oldest  plate  belonging  to  the  Corporation." 

EAST  RIDING  of  the  County  of  Yorkshire.     See  Yorkshire. 

EAST  SUFFOLK.     See  Suffolk. 
EAST  SUSSEX.     See  Sussex. 

EASTBOURNE  (Sussex).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  On  the  Corporation  seal 
is  a  representation  of  a  bogus  coat-of-arms,  which  also  appears  on  the  note- 
paper  as  follows: — "Argent  on  a  fesse  between  four  bars  gules,  a  rose  between 
two  stags'  heads  caboshed  "  (evidently  taken  from  the  Cavendish  Arms).  For 
a  Crest,  appears  a  sea-horse  presumably  proper,  though  the  Corporation  of 
Eastbourne  evidently  consider  that  a  wreath  to  support  the  crest  is  a  bygone 
and  undesirable  appendage.     Motto — "  Meliora  sequimur." 

EASTBOURNE  COLLEGE.     Azure,  on  a  cross  argent,  a  rose  gules,  in  the  first 
quarter  a  stag's  head  caboshed  of  the  second.     Motto — "  Ex  oriente  salus." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

EASTER  ROSS  FARMERS'  CLUB.  Parted  per  chevron  gules  and  ermine,  in 
the  dexter  chief  an  antique  lamp  or,  flaming  proper,  and  in  the  sinister  chief  a 
book,  expanded  of  the  third,  in  base  a  bull's  head  erased  sable,  horned  and 
ringed  gold,  and  in  an  Escroll  under  the  same,  this  Motto — "  Scientia  naturam 
ducet." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  1895.] 

262 


EASTBOURNE 


EASTBOURNE  COLLEGE 


EASTER  ROSS  FARMERS'  CLUB 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ECCLES,  Borough  of  (Lancashire).  Or,  on  a  mount  vert,  an  ecclesiastical 
building  masoned  proper,  a  chief  azure,  thereon  between  two  sprigs  of  the 
cotton-tree  slipped  and  fructed  of  the  third  a  pale  argent,  charged  with  a 
representation  of  a  Naesmyth  steam-hammer  sable.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of 
the  colours,  in  front  of  a  rock  surmounted  by  a  lighthouse,  a  ship  under  sail 
to  the  sinister  all  proper.  Motto — "  Lahore  omnia  florent." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  7th  November  1893.] 

EDINBURGH.  The  entry  in  Lyon  Register  is  as  follows: — "The  Royall  Burgh 
of  Edinburgh  bears  Argent  a  castle  triple-towered  and  embattled,  sable  masoned 
of  the  first  and  topped  with  three  fans  gules,  windows  and  portcullis  shut  of  the 
last,  situate  on  a  rock  proper.  And  on  a  wreath  of  the  colours  is  set  for  Crest, 
An  anchor  wreathed  about  with  a  cable  all  proper.  Motto,  in  an  escrol  above. 
Nisi  Dominus  Frustra.  Supported  on  the  dexter  by  a  maid  richly  attir'd  with 
her  hair  hanging  down  over  her  shoulders,  and  on  the  sinister  by  a  doe  proper." 

The  patent  granting  these  arms,  which  was  presented  for  registration  on 
the  23rd  day  of  November  1774,  is  dated  the  21st  day  of  April  1732,  and  signed 
Alex.  Brodie,  Lyon. 

No  painting  of  the  arms  exists  in  the  Lyon  Register.  The  patent 
mentioned  cannot  be  found  and  as  a  "  maid  richly  attir'd  with  her  hair  hanging 
down  over  her  shoulders"  is  slightly  indefinite,  it  is  with  no  great  sense  of 
security  that  the  accompanying  illustration  is  put  forward,  The  varying  styles 
of  "  fashion,  form,  and  feature  "  suggested  to  answer  the  requirements  of  the 
blazon  are  many  and  wonderful.  The  following  legend,  which  the  editor  takes 
from  a  newspaper  cutting,  may  or  may  not  have  reference  to  the  arms  of  the 
town  : — 

"The  historians  of  that  city  cannot  be  accused  of  indifference  to  the 
antiquity  of  their  town,  for  some  of  them  maintain  that  its  foundation  dates  as 
far  back  as  989  B.C.,  when,  according  to  these  fabulous  accounts,  Ebranke  was 
King  of  Britain,  as  well  as  of  Albanye  or  Scotland.  Now  King  Ebranke  seems 
to  have  been  a  thoroughgoing  Bluebeard,  having  as  many  as  twenty-one  wives 
and  half  a  hundred  children.  For  his  twenty-five  daughters  he  built  the  Castle 
of  Maydens,  which  is  Edinburgh  Castle,  and  which  appears  on  the  .'\rms  of  the 
town.  Here  he  kept  them  until  they  were  grown  up,  when  he  packed  them  all 
off  to  Italy  to  be  married.  Whether  they  all  lived  happy  ever  afterwards  we 
cannot  say.  As  to  the  Castle,  we  know  that  the  early  history  of  Edinburgh  is 
chiefly  confined  to  accounts  of  that  stronghold.  King  David  I.  seems  the  first 
of  the  real  kings  who  made  it  his  residence.  There  is  a  picturesque  story  about 
his  having  gone  out  to  hunt  deer,  and  how  he  became  separated  from  the  rest 
of  the  party,  and  thrown  from  his  horse  near  the  castle  gate.  Here  a  white  hart 
was  rushing  upon  him  to  gore  him,  when  a  cross  marvellously  slipped  into  his 
hand,  and  the  hart  being  frightened  at  seeing  this,  turned  away  and  left  him 
unharmed.  The  words  of  the  motto  are  from  Psalm  cxxvii.  and  imply  the 
vanity  of  human  effort  unless  blessed  by  Heaven." 

264 


ECCLES 


EDINBURGH 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
EDINBURGH,  University  of.     See  University  of  Edinburgh. 

EDINBURGH,  See  of.  Azure,  a  saltire  argent,  in  chief  a  mitre  of  the  second, 
garnished  or. 

[These  arms  were  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register  in  1674  and  are  still 
in  use,  but  by  the  disestablishment  of  the  Episcopal  Church  in  Scotland,  they 
are  really  extinct  and  their  present  use  is  improper.] 

EDINBURGH,  The  Company  of  Merchants  in.  Argent,  in  the  sea  a  ship 
under  sail  proper,  flagged  of  Scotland,  a  chief  tierced  per  pale  azure  vert  and 
argent ;  in  the  first,  a  saltire  argent,  charged  with  a  thistle  vert,  and  over  it 
a  crown  or :  in  the  second,  two  ells  in  saltire  or,  and  from  a  cloud  above  a  hand 
issuant  holding  a  pair  of  balances  proper  ;  in  the  third,  a  castle-triple  towered 
sable.  Crest — A  sphere.  Motto — "  Terra  marique."  Supporters — Two  sea 
unicorns. 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  14th  July  1693.] 

EDINBURGH,  Trades  Corporate  Bodies.  There  are  fourteen  Corporate  Bodies  of 
Trades  in  Edinburgh :  at  the  head  of  the  whole  Incorporation  is  a  Deacon- 
Convener,  elected  annually.  He  wears  as  a  badge  of  office  a  gold  medal  on 
which  arms  are  engraved  for  the  fourteen  Trades.  None  of  these  have  been 
matriculated  in  Lyon  Register  except  the  Surgeons.  As  they  are  separate 
coats-of-arms  they  are  given  herein  under  the  several  trades,  viz..  Surgeons, 
Goldsmiths,  Skinners,  Furriers,  Hammermen,  Wrights,  Masons,  Taylors, 
Baxters,  Fleshers,  Cordners,  Weavers,  Wakers,  Bonnet- Makers,  to  all  of  which 
refer. 

EDINBURGH  AND  GLASGOW  BANK.  Quarterly  i  and  4  argent,  a  castle 
triple-towered  and  embattled  sable,  masoned  of  the  first,  windows  and  portcullis 
shut  gules,  situate  on  a  rock  proper  2  and  3  argent,  an  oak-tree  growing  out 
of  a  mount  in  base  with  a  bird  standing  on  the  top  thereof  and  a  bell  hanging 
on  a  branch  in  the  sinister  side  and  surmounted  by  a  salmon  fessways  in  base 
with  a  ring  in  its  mouth  all  proper.  Crest — An  anchor  wreathed  about  with  a 
cable,  both  proper. 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  27th  December  1849.] 


266 


EDINBURGH,  SEE  OF 


EDINBURGH  AND  GLASGOW  BANK 


COMPANY  OF  MERCHANTS,  EDINBURGH 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

EDINBURGH  LIFE  ASSURANCE  COMPANY.  Gules,  a  chevron  between  an 
anchor  and  an  ^Esculapian  Rod  in  chief  and  in  base  a  pair  of  scales,  all  or. 
Mantling — Gules  doubled  or.  Crest — On  a  rock  proper,  a  triple-towered  castle 
sable,  masoned  argent,  windows,  portcullis,  and  flags  gules,  and  on  a  compart- 
ment below  the  shield  are  set  for  Supporters — On  the  dexter  a  maid  vested 
azure,  and  on  the  sinister  a  hind  proper. 

[Marticulated  in  Lyon  Register,  February  24,  1908.] 

EDINBURGH,  Royal  Colleges  of  Physicians  and  Surgeons  in.  Refer  to 
Physicians,  and  to  Surgeons. 

EDINBURGH  ACADEMY.      Has  no  arms.     Uses  a  device  of  the  head  of  Homer. 

EDINBURGH  INSTITUTION.  Has  no  arms,  but  uses  a  device  of  the  head  of 
Athene  within  a  garter  bearing  the  Motto — "  Doctrina  vim  promovet  insitam." 

EDINBURGH  ROYAL  HIGH  SCHOOL.  Uses  the  arms,  crest,  and  supporters 
of  the  City  of  Edinburgh  with  the  City  Motto  below  the  shield.  The  school 
"uses,  over  the  Crest,  the  additional  Motto — "  Musis  respublica  floret." 

EDUCATIONAL  INSTITUTE  OF  SCOTLAND,  The  General  Committee 
of  Management  of  Or,  a  lion  rampant  gules,  armed  and  langued  azure,  on  a 
chief  of  the  last  a  saltire  argent,  between  a  triple-towered  castle  upon  a  rock 
of  the  fourth,  the  castle  masoned  sable,  and  a  terrestrial  globe  proper.  Crest — 
Issuing  out  of  a  cloud,  a  dexter  hand  holding  an  open  book  erect,  all  proper. 
Motto  (above  crest) — "  Doctrina  vim  promovet  insitam." 
[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  4th  June  1852.] 

EGYPT.  Gules,  three  mullets  of  five  points  each  within  the  horns  of  a  decrescent 
all  argent. 


268 


EDINBURGH  LIFE  ASSURANCE  COMPANY 


EGYPT 


EDUCATIONAL  INSTITUTE  OF  SCOTLAND 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ELBERFELD  (Germany).  Argent,  on  a  grid-iron  azure,  a  lion  rampant  gules, 
crowned  or. 

ELGIN  or  MURRAY,  County  of.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

ELGIN  (Elginshire).  The  Entry  in  Lyon  Register  is  as  follows: — "The  Royall 
Burgh  of  Elgine  bears  Argent,  Sanctus  .lEgidius  habited  in  his  robes  and 
mytred,  holding  in  his  dexter  hand  a  pastoral  staff,  and  in  his  left  hand  a 
clasped  book,  all  proper.  Supported  by  two  angels  proper,  winged  or,  volant 
upwards,  and  the  Motto,  '  Sic  itur  ad  astra'  upon  ane  compartment  suitabill  to  a 
Burgh  Royal,  and  for  their  colours  red  and  white.  Recorded  in  terms  of  an 
Interlocutor  of  Lyon  King  of  Arms  of  2Sth  November  iS88,  and  agreeably 
to  the  blazon  of  James  Skeen,  Lyon  Depute,  of  date  gth  October  167S. — 
(Signed)  J.  LORIMER,  Lyon  Clerk." 

ELIE,  LIBERTY  AND  WILLIAMSBURGH  (Fifeshire).  Has  no  armorial 
bearings.  The  seal  shows  the  Baird  crest,  "a  griffin's  head  erased,"  with  the 
Motto — "  Dominus  fecit." 

ELLON — Has  no  arms.     The  seal  shows  the  three  garbs  of  the  Earldom  of  Buchan. 

ELPHIN,  See  of.  Sable,  two  crosiers  indorsed  in  saltire  or,  in  base  a  lamb 
couchant  argent,  in  chief  a  mitre  of  the  second. 

[This  coat  is  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office,  but  through  the  disestablishment 
of  the  Irish  Church  it  is  really  extinct  and  its  present  use  is  illegal.] 

ELPHIN.     Refer  to  Kilmore,  Elphin  and  Ardagh,  Bishop  of 

ELSASS-LOTHRINGEN.     Refer  to  Alsace-Lorraine. 

ELSING  SPITAL  (Spitalfields,  London).  Gules,  a  lion  rampant  barry  of  eight 
argent  and  sable. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

ELTHAM  COLLEGE.  Uses  a  device  of  a  trident  erect  surmounted  by  a  royal 
crown  and  entwined  by  two  dolphins  haurient  respecting  each  other.  Jlfotto — 
"  Esto  perpetua." 

[Of  no  authority.] 


270 


ELBERFELD 


ELPHIN,  SEE  OF 


1 1 II II  i 


aiC   ITUR     MD  ASTR/^ 


LJ-J    Mil        ^ 


ELGIN 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ELY  (Cambridgeshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Berry  adds  a  note : — "  This 
city  is  not  a  corporation,  and  therefore  hath  not  any  Arms."  Those  of  the 
See,  viz.,  "gu.  three  ducal  coronets,  two  and  one  or,"  are  by  many  persons, 
although  erroneously,  said  to  be  the  arms  of  the  city. 

ELY,  See  of.     Gules,  three  ducal  crowns  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 
These  arms  first  appear  on  the  seal  of  Bishop  William  de  Luda  (1390-S). 

ELY,  Dean  of.     Gules,  three  l<eys  erect  or,  wards  to  the  dexter. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

EMBROIDERERS'  COMPANY.     Refer  to  Broderers'  Company. 

EMBROIDERERS'  COMPANY  (Bristol),  Gules,  two  broaches  in  saltire  argent, 
between  two  bundles  or,  on  a  chief  of  the  second,  a  lion  passant  gules. 

[Previously  the  arms  in  use  were  those  of  the  Broderers'  Company  of 
London,  to  which  refer.  There  is  no  authority  for  the  use  of  either  by  the 
Bristol  Company.] 

EMBROIDERERS'  COMPANY  (Chester).  Used  the  same  arms  as  the 
Embroiderers'  Company  of  Bristol. 

EMLY.     Refer  to  Cashel  and  Emiy,  Waterford  and  Lismore,  Bishop  of. 

EMMANUEL  COLLEGE  (Cambridge).  (Founded  in  1584  by  Sir  Walter 
Mildmay,  Knt.,  Chancellor  and  Treasurer  of  the  Exchequer.)  Argent,  a  lion 
rampant  azure,  holding  in  the  dexter  paw  a  chaplet  of  laurel  vert,  in  chief  a 
scroll  sable  thereon  the  word  Emmanuel  gold. 

[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.     Granted  ist  January  1588-9.] 

EMMANUEL  COLLEGE  OF  BRISBANE.  Parted  per  pale  gules  and  or,  on 
the  dexter  an  open  book  proper,  leaved  gold,  and  in  the  sinister  a  lion  rampant 
of  the  first,  gorged  with  a  collar  of  the  second,  on  a  chief  azure,  the  constellation 
of  the  Southern  cross  argent.  Mantling — Gules,  doubled  argent.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  of  the  liveries,  issuing  from  a  mount,  a  burning  bush  proper.  Motto 
(over  crest) — "  Nee  tamen  consumebatur,"  (below  shield)  "  Fiat  lux." 
[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  31st  May  1912.] 


272 


ELY,  SEE  OF 


EMMANUEL  COLLEGE  (CAMBRIDGE) 


ELY,  DEAN  OF 


EMMANUEL  COLLEGE  OF  BRISBANE 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
ENGERN.     Refer  to  Cologne,  Elector  of. 

ENGINEERS,  Institution  of  Civil.     Or,  on  a  pale  azure,  between  two  annulets  in 
fesse  sable,  a  thunderbolt  between  in  chief  a  sun  in  splendour  of  the  first,  and  in 
base  a  fountain  proper.     Motto — "  Scientia  et  ingenio.'' 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  17th  March  1913.] 

ENGLAND.  Gules,  three  lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  or.  Refer  to  Great  Britain 
and  Ireland. 

ENGLAND,  Bank  of     Refer  to  Bank  of  England. 

ENNIS  (Co.  Clare).     Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in  Ulster's  Office. 

ENNISCORTHY  (Co.  Wexford).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in  Ulster's 
Office.  Upon  a  sheet  of  Irish  arms  published  by  Marcus  Ward  &  Co.,  Ltd., 
the  following  are  given  : — "Azure,  on  a  mount  vert,  a  castle  or,  and  from  the 
battlements  an  eagle  issuant  argent." 

ENNISKILLEN  (Co.  Fermanagh).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in 
Ulster's  Office.  The  seal  represents  a  castle  triple-towered,  each  tower  domed 
and  flagged. 

EPSOM  COLLEGE  (Epsom,  Surrey).  Per  pale  azure  and  sable,  three  fleurs-de- 
lis  or,  on  a  chief  of  the  last,  an  open  book  proper,  inscribed  with  the  words, 
"  Olim  meminisse  juvabit,"  between  in  the  dexter  a  lamp  and  in  the  sinister  a 
Rod  of  jEsculapius,  gules.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  in  front  of  an 
eagle's  head,  between  two  wings  azure,  three  fleurs-de-lis  gold.  Motto — •"  Deo 
non  Fortuna." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  June  7,  1910.] 

EREMUE,  alias  YARMOUTH  (Isle  of  Wight).     See  Yarmouth. 

ERITH  URBAN   DISTRICT  COUNCIL  (Kent).     Argent,  a  fleur-de-lis  sable 
between  three  lucies  haurient  two  and  one  gules,  on  a  canton  of  the  last  a  horse 
forcene  of  the  field     Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  in  front  of  a  garb  or,  a 
stag  courant  gules.     Motto — "  Labour  overcomes  all  things." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  February  27,  1906.] 


274 


ENNISCORTHY 


INSTITUTION  OF  CIVIL  ENGINEERS 


EPSOM  COLLEGE 


ERITH  URBAN  DISTRICT  COUNCIL 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
ESCLAVONIA.     Refer  to  Austria. 

ESSEX.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Gules,  three  seaxes  fesseways  proper  (identi- 
cally as  formerly  claimed  by  Middlesex)  are  sometimes  quoted  as  the  arms. 

ETON  COLLEGE.  Sable,  three  lilies  slipped  argent  two  and  one,  a  chief  per 
pale  azure  and  gules,  on  the  dexter  side  a  fleur-de-lis  and  on  the  sinister  a  lion 
passant  guardant  or. 

[Granted  by  Letters  Patent  under  the  Great  Seal  by  King  Henry  VI., 
1st  January  1449.     Grant  printed  "  Excerpta  Historica,"  47.] 

EVESHAM  (Worcestershire).  x'\zure,  a  prince's  coronet  (that  is,  composed  of 
crosses  patee  and  fleurs-de-lis)  or,  between  two  ostrich  feathers  in  chief  argent, 
the  quills  bezantee,  and  a  garb  in  base  of  the  second,  all  within  a  bordure  sable, 
also  bezantee. 

Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms  at  the  Visitation  of  Worcestershire,  1634. 

Henry,  Prince  of  Wales,  son  of  James  I.,  obtained  for  Evesham  its  Charter 
of  Incorporation,  hence  the  coronet  and  ostrich  feathers  of  the  Prince  of  Wales, 
the  garb  of  the  Earl  of  Chester,  and  the  bordure  sable  bezantee  of  the  Duke  of 
Cornwall. 

EXCHANGE  ASSURANCE  COMPANY,  Royal.  Refer  to  Royal  Exchange 
Assurance  Compan}-. 

EXCHEQUER,  Remembrancer  of     Refer  to  Stafford's  Inn. 

EXCISE,  Farmers  of  (Ireland).     Refer  to  Farmers  of  Excise. 


276 


ESSEX 


ETON  COLLEGE 


EVESHAM 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

EXETER  (Devonshire).  Party  per  pale  gules  and  sable,  a  triangular  castle  with 
three  towers  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  or  and  sable,  a  demi-lion  rampant  gules, 
crowned  or,  holding  between  the  paws  a  mound  of  the  last,  banded  azure,  and 
surmounted  with  a  cross  botonnee  gold.  Stipporters — On  either  side  a  pegasus 
with  wings  inverted  argent,  maned  and  unguled  or,  charged  on  the  wing  with 
three  bars  wavy  azure.     Motto — "  Semper  fidelis." 

The  coat-of-arms  was  ratified  and  confirmed,  and  the  crest  and  supporters 
were  granted,  6th  August  1564,  by  Harvey,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms,  at  the 
Visitation  of  Devonshire. 

The  helmet  is  stated  to  be  "  manteled  azur,  dubled  argent." 

Badge — In  front  of  two  swords  in  saltire,  points  upwards  or,  a  Tudor  hat 
gules  embroidered  gold. 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  October  16,  1907.] 

EXETER,  See  of     Gules,  a  sword  in  pale  point  upwards  argent,  pomel  and  hilt  or, 
surmounted  by  two  keys  in  saltire,  the  wards  upwards  of  the  last. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 
These  arms  first  appear  on  the  seal  of  Bishop  John  Boothe  (1465-78). 

EXETER,  Dean  of     Azure,  a  stag's  head  cabossed  or  [Woodward  gives  argent], 
between  the  attires  a  cross  pattee  fitchee  of  the  last. 
[Of  no  authority.] 


278 


EXETER 


EXETER,  DEAN  OF 


EXETER,  SEE  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

EXETER,  Precentor  of.     Argent,  on  a  saltire  azure,  a  fleur-de-lis  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

EXETER,  Chancellor  of     Gules,  a  saltire  argent,  between  four  cross  crosslets  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

EXETER,  Treasurer  of     Gules,  a  saltire  engrailed  between  four  leopards'  heads  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

EXETER  COLLEGE  (Oxford).  (Founded  in  1316  by  Walter  Staplcdon,  Bishop 
of  Exeter,  Lord  High  Treasurer  of  England,  and  Secretary  of  State  to  Edward 
II.  At  first  it  was  known  as  Stapledon  Hall,  but  in  1404  Edmund  Stafford, 
Bishop  of  Exeter,  added  two  fellowships,  and  its  name  was  changed.  The 
bordure  alludes  to  the  arms  of  the  See  of  Exeter.  Argent,  two  bends  nebuly 
within  a  bordure  sable,  charged  with  eight  pairs  of  keys  endorsed  and  inter- 
laced in  the  rings  or. 

[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms  at  the  Visitation  of  the  County  of  Oxford, 
IS74-] 

EXETER  MERCHANT  ADVENTURERS.  Refer  to  Merchant  Adventurers 
trading  to  France. 

EXETER,  Trade  Companies.     Refer  to  the  several  trades. 


EXETER,  PRECENTOR  OF 


EXETER,  CHANCELLOR  OF 


EXETER,  TREASURER  OF 


EXETER  COLLEGE  (OXFORD) 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

EYE  (Suffolk).  Azure,  a  cross  patonce  between  four  martlets  or,  in  chief  two 
branches  of  .  .  .  in  saltirc  vert,  flowered  argent,  thereon  an  eagle  perched  with 
wings  expanded  of  the  last,  ducally  crowned  of  the  second.  And  for  the  Crest 
— Upon  the  royal  crown  or,  the  cap  gules,  an  estoile  irradiated  and  charged 
with  a  human  eye  of  the  first.  Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.  Motto — 
"Oculus  in  coelum  "  {sic). 

The  seal  represents  the  word  Eye  surmounted  by  an  antique  ducal  coronet, 
with  the  legend,  "  Sigillum  Comune  Burgi  de  Eye." 

FALKIRK,  Burgh  of  (Stirlingshire).  Sable,  on  a  bend  bretessed  accompanied 
by  six  billets  or,  three  in  chief  and  three  in  base,  the  Church  of  Falkirk  between 
two  swords  and  two  highland  claymores,  both  in  saltire,  the  former  surmounted 
of  a  shield  of  1298,  the  latter  of  a  target  of  1746,  all  proper.  On  a  compartment 
below  the  shield  with  the  Motto — "  Better  meddle  \\\  the  deil  than  the  bairns  o' 
Fa'kirk,  "  is  placed  behind  the  shield  for  Supporter — A  lion  rampant  affrontee 
gules,  armed  and  langued  azure,  crowned  with  a  mural  crown  argent,  masoned 
sable,  and  in  an  Escrol  over  the  same  this  Motto — "  Touch  ane  touch  a'." 
[Matriculated,  Lyon  Register,  April  20,  1906.] 

FALKLAND  ISLANDS.  No  warrant  assigning  arms  has  as  yet  been  issued  to 
the  Falkland  Islands. 

FALKLAND   ISLANDS,  See  of.     Per  fesse  in    chief  argent,    a  cross   gules,   in 
base  azure  a  map  of  South  America. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

FALKLAND  (Fifeshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The 
seal,  which  is  of  very  rude  workmanship,  represents  upon  a  mount,  and  in  front 
of  a  tree  growing  therefrom,  a  stag  lodged  regardant.  The  legend  is,  "  Discite 
justitiam  moniti  temnere  Christum." 

FALMOUTH  (Cornwall).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  an 
eagle  displayed  with  two  heads  charged  on  the  breast  and  on  each  wing  with  a 
tower. 

FANMAKERS  (or  Fan-stickmakers),  The  Worshipful  Company  of  (London). 
(Incorporated  19th  April  1709.)  Or,  a  fan  displayed  with  a  mount  of  various 
device  and  colours,  the  sticks  gules  :  on  a  chief  per  pale  gules  and  azure,  on  the 
dexter  side  a  shaving  iron  over  a  bundle  of  fan-sticks  tied  together  or,  on  the 
sinister  side  a  framed  saw  in  pale  of  the  last.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours, 
a  hand  couped  proper,  holding  a  fan  displayed  or.  Motto — "Arts  and  Trades 
united." 

[Of  no  authority.] 

FARMERS'  CLUB.     Refer  to  Easter  Ross  Farmers'  Club. 


282 


FALKIRK 


EYE 


FANMAKERS,  COMPANY  OF 


FALKLAND  ISLANDS,  SEE  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

FARMERS  OF  EXCISE  OF  IRELAND.  (Grant  of  a  seal.)  "  In  an  escocheon 
an  anchor  and  harp."  "  The  Seale  of  the  Farmers  of  the  Excise  and  Customs 
of  Ireland." 

[Granted  by  St  George,  Ulster,  February  17,  1663.] 

FAROE  ISLANDS.     Refer  to  Denmark. 

FARRIERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  17th  January 
1684.)  Argent,  three  horse-shoes  sable,  pierced  of  the  field.  Crest — On  a  wreath 
of  the  colours,  an  arm  embowed  issuing  from  clouds  on  the  sinister  side  all 
proper,  holding  in  the  hand  a  hammer  azure,  handled  and  ducally  crowned  or. 
Supporters — Two  horses  argent.  Motto — "  Vi  et  virtute." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

FAVERSHAM  (Kent).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  But  Burke's  "General 
Armory  "  quotes  "  Gu.  three  lions  pass,  guard,  in  pale  per  pale  or  and  an,"  and 
these  arms  appear  upon  the  seal. 

FEDERATED  STATES  OF  MALAY.     Refer  to  Malay. 

FELSTED  SCHOOL  (Essex).  Gules,  a  chevron  between  three  crosses  bottony 
or.     Motto — "  Garde  ta  foy." 

[Of  no  authority,  being  the  arms  of  Lord  Riche,  the  founder.] 


284 


FARRIERS,  COMPANY  OF 


FAVERSHAM 


FELSTED  SCHOOL 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

FELTMAKERS,  The  WorshipfulCompany  of  (London).  (Incorporated  2nd  August 
1604.)  Argent,  a  dexter  hand  couped  at  the  wrist  gules,  between  two  hat-bands 
nowed  azure,  in  chief  a  hat  sable  banded  of  the  third.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of 
the  colours,  a  naked  arm  embowed  proper  holding  in  the  hand  a  hat  sable, 
banded  azure,  lilotto — "  Decus  et  tutamen." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

FENTON  (Staffordshire).  Had  no  armorial  bearings,  and,  moreover,  was  not  en- 
titled to  bear  them.  Still  the  following  have  had  very  extensive  use  : — Argent,  a 
cross  diapered  (of  a  lozenge  pattern),  between,  in  the  first  quarter,  a  vase  (or  soup- 
tureen)  ;  in  the  second,  upon  a  mount  two  pottery  kilns  ;  in  the  third,  upon  a 
mount  a  representation  of  a  pit-mouth  (.')  ;  in  the  fourth,  upon  a  mount  a  garb 
in  front  of  a  plough,  presumably  all  proper.  Crest — A  goat's  head  erased  proper. 
Motto — "  Onward  and  upward."  The  goat's  head  is  said  to  be  the  crest  of  a 
family  named  Baker,  who  have  for  a  long  time  resided  in  Fenton.  It  would  be 
interesting  to  know  if  they  had  established  any  right  to  it  themselves  before 
passing  it  on  to  Fenton,  who  assuredly  can  have  had  none.  Fenton  now  forms 
part  of  the  Amalgamated  Borough  of  Stoke-on-Trent,  to  wliich  refer. 

FERMANAGH,  County.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

FERNS  AND  LEIGHLIN,  See  of.  Sable,  two  croziers  endorsed  in  saltire  or,  sup- 
pressed with  a  mitre  labelled  of  the  last. 

[This  coat,  which  is  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office,  remains  in  use,  but  through 
the  disestablishment  of  the  Irish  Church  it  is  really  extinct  and  its  present  use  is 
illegal.  Woodward  gives  the  foregoing  coat  as  that  of  Leighlin,  and  attributes 
to  Ferns  that  given  by  Burke  as  the  modern  arms  of  Ossory.] 

FERNS.     Refer  to  Ossory,  Ferns,  and  Leighlin,  Bishop  of 

FERRARA  (Italy).     Per  fesse  sable  and  argent. 

FETHARD  (Co.  Tipperary).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal,  an  impression 
of  which  has  come  under  the  editor's  notice,  is  quadrilateral  in  shape,  simply 
showing  upon  a  mount  a  stag  trippant  within  the  legend  "The  Corporation  of 
Fethard  Seal."  But  Burke  in  his  "  General  Armory  "  says,  "  The  Seal  is  a  stag 
standing  before  a  tree  ppr." 

FETHARD  (Co.  Wexford).  (Incorporated  161 3.)  Gules,  Mars  in  complete 
armour  sable,  garnished  or,  stockings  whitish,  his  shoes  sable,  his  kilt  azure,  on 
his  head  a  plume,  on  his  sinister  arm  a  round  shield  of  St  George,  brandishing 
in  his  dexter  hand  a  sword  proper,  the  whole  between  two  lions  passant  guardant 
or. 

[Granted  by  Preston,  Ulster  King  of  Arms,  April  i,  1641.] 


2S6 


FELTMAKERS,   COMPANY  OF 


FERNS  AND  LEIGHLIN,   SEE  OF 


FERRARA 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

FETTES  COLLEGE  (Edinburgh).  Has  no  arms.  Those  in  use  are :  Or,  a 
chevron  between  in  chief  two  mullets  (of  six  points),  and  in  base  a  cross  crosslet 
fitch^e  gules.  Crest — A  bee  volant  in  pale.  Motto — "  Industria."  Supporters — 
(Dexter)  a  lion  rampant  gules  ;  (sinister)  a  stag  proper,  collared  and  chained  or. 
[These  are  the  arms  of  the  founder  of  the  College,  and  are  used  intact,  even 
to  the  inescutcheon  of  a  Baronet  upon  the  chevron.] 

FEVERSHAM.     See  Faversham. 

FIFESHIRE.     Has  no  armorial  bearings.     The  seal  represents  the  crest  of  his 
Grace  the  late  Duke  of  Fife. 

FIJI,  Colony  of.  Argent,  a  cross  gules,  between  in  the  first  quarter  three  sugar  canes 
couped,  in  the  second  a  cocoa-nut  palm  also  couped,  in  the  third  a  dove  volant 
holding  in  the  beak  a  branch  of  olive,  and  in  the  fourth  a  bunch  of  banana  fruits 
slipped  all  proper,  on  a  chief  of  the  second  a  lion  passant  guardant  crowned  or, 
holding  between  the  forepaws  a  cocoa  pod  proper.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  a  Fijian  canoe  with  outrigger  in  full  sail  proper.  Supporters — (Dexter) 
a  Fijian  native  affrontee,  round  his  waist  a  Tapa  sulu  (kilt  of  mulberry-tree  bark), 
holding  in  the  exterior  hand  a  barbed  spear  all  proper ;  (sinister)  a  like  native  in 
profile  holding  in  the  exterior  hand  a  pine-apple  club  in  bend  sinister,  all  proper. 
Motto — "  Rere  vaka  na  kalou  ka  doka  na  tui  "  ("  Fear  God,  honour  the  King  "). 
[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  4th  July  190S.] 

FINLAND.     Refer  to  Russia. 

FINSBURY,  Borough  of  (London).     Has  no  arms. 

FIRENZE  (Italy).     Refer  to  Florence. 

FISHERMEN'S  GUILD  (Beufeld,  Alsace-Lorraine).     17th  century— Azure,  an 
oar  in  pale  or,  surmounted  by  two  fish  in  saltire,  heads  downwards  argent. 

FISHERY   COMPANY,    ROYAL,  or   ROYAL   COMPANY   OF    FISHING. 

Barry  wavy  of  six  argent  and  azure,  an  ancient  galley  with  one  mast,  and  pennon 
or.  Crest — In  a  prince's  coronet  or,  three  tridents  sable,  points  upwards  gold. 
Supporters — (De.xter)  a  merman  ;  (sinister),  a  mermaid,  both  proper,  and  crined 
or,  each  holding  in  the  exterior  hand  the  Union  banner.  Motto — "  Messis  ab  alto." 
[Granted  by  Walker,  Garter,  13th  December  1664.] 


FETTES  COLLEGE 


FIJI 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

FISHMONGERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Originally  two 
Companies,  the  Salt  Fishmongers  and  the  Stock  Fishmongers,  united  1537. 
Earliest  charter,  1272,  to  Salt  Fishmongers.)  Azure,  three  dolphins  naiant 
in  pale  argent,  finned  or,  between  two  pairs  of  lucies  in  saltire  (the 
sinister  surmounting  the  dexter)  proper,  over  the  nose  of  each  lucy  a  ducal 
crown  of  the  third,  on  a  chief  gules,  three  pairs  of  keys  endorsed  in  saltire  or. 
Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  two  cubit  arms  erect,  the  dexter  vested  or, 
the  sinister  azure,  both  cuffed  argent,  holding  in  the  hands  proper  a  regal  crown 
of  the  last.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  merman  proper,  on  his  head  a  helmet  the 
body  only  covered  in  armour,  in  his  dexter  hand  a  sabre  all  of  the  first  ;  (sinister) 
a  mermaid  proper,  crined  or,  in  her  sinister  hand  a  mirror  of  the  last.  Motto — 
"  All  worship  be  to  God  only." 

[Arms  granted  1536.  Confirmed  by  Robert  Cooke,  Clarenceu.x,  17th 
September  1575.] 

The  foregoing  arms  are  a  combination  of  the  coats  originally  in  use  by  the 
Stock  Fishmongers  (azure,  two  lucies  in  saltire  argent  with  coronets  over  their 
mouths  or,  on  a  chief  gules  three  dolphins  naiant  argent)  and  the  Salt  Fish- 
mongers (azure,  three  dolphins  naiant  argent,  on  a  chief  gules  three  cross  keys 
saltirevvise  or).  After  the  Union  of  the  two  Companies  the  above  conjoined 
arms  were  granted,  1575. 

FLANDERS  MERCHANTS,  or  BRABANT  MERCHANTS.  Azure  and  .silver 
undey,  a  chief  quarterly,  the  first  and  fourth  quarters  gules,  a  leopard  gold  armed 
azure,  the  second  and  third  quarters  or,  two  roses  gules. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.  Refer  to  the  New  Adventurers  or 
French  Merchants  Company,  with  which  this  may  have  had  some  connection.] 

FLESHERS  (Butchers).  Incorporated  Trade  (Edinburgh).  Argent,  two  axes  in 
saltire  endorsed  proper  between  three  bulls'  heads  couped  sable,  on  a  chief 
azure,  a  boar's  head  couped  between  two  garbs  or. 

[Not  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register.  Refer  sub  Edinburgh.  Berry 
suggests  that  the  garbs  should  be  block-brushes  {i.e.  bunches  of  holly)  as  in  the 
arms  of  the  Butchers'  Company  of  London.] 

FLETCHERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Founded  14S7.)  Azure, 
a  chevron  between  three  arrows  or,  barbed  and  flighted  argent.  Crest— On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  a  demi-angel  proper,  with  wings  endorsed  or,  vested  of 
the  last,  holding  a  bundle  of  arrows  also  or.     Motto — "True  and  Sure." 

[Granted  by  Thomas  Holme,  Clarenceux,  12th  October  1467.  Grant 
printed  "Genealogist,"  iv.  127.] 

FLINTSHIRE.      Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

FLINT  (Flintshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  water  in  base, 
and  thereon  on  the  sinister  side  a  three-masted  ship  partly  under  sail ;  rising 
from  the  water  on  the  dexter  side  is  a  rock,  and  thereupon  a  castle. 

290 


FISHMONGERS,  COMPANY  OF 


FLETCHERS,  COMPANY  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
FLORENCE  (Italy).     Argent,  a  fleur-de-lis  flowered  gules. 

FOLKESTONE  (Kent).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  upon 
waves  of  the  sea  an  antique  ship  of  one  mast,  the  sail  furled,  towered  at  each 
end,  a  man's  head  appearing  above  the  battlements  of  each,  and  at  the  masthead 
a  turret,  and  a  man  in  the  body  of  the  boat,  and  another  in  the  stern  turret. 
The  picture  postcards  represent  the  arms  to  be  "  Azure,  on  waves  of  the  sea 
proper  a  lymphad  or,  sails  furled  and  flags  flying." 

FORDWICH  (Kent).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

FORFARSHIRE.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

FORFAR  (Forfarshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  Those 
used  are  as  according  to  the  annexed  blazon,  which  is  quoted  as  it  has  been 
supplied  to  the  editor,  though  it  exhibits  several  heraldic  errors:— Arms — 
Azure  a  square  castle  embattled  above  the  gate  and  on  the  top  of  the  walls. 
Triple  towered,  the  centre  one  largest,  all  pyramidically  roofed  argent,  masoned 
sable,,  the  portcullis  and  windows  gules.  The  middle  tower  ensigned  with  a 
staff"  and  banner  charged  with  the  Royal  Arms  of  Scotland.  On  a  chief  wavy  or, 
a  fir-tree  proper,  between  a  bull's  head  and  stag's  head,  both  caboshed,  argent. 
Crest — On  a  wreath,  a  lion  rampant  azure.  Supporters — Two  warriors  in  Roman 
costume,  the  one  on  the  de.xter  having  a  bow  in  his  right  hand  with  a  quiver 
of  arrows  slung  on  his  shoulder;  the  one  on  the  sinister  having  a  target 
(charged  with  a  thistle)  on  his  left  arm,  and  a  sword  or  sabre  hung  by  a  belt  at 
his  side,  proper.     Motto — "  Ut  quocunque  paratus." 

FORRES  (Elginshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The  seal, 
which  is  of  remarkably  fine  workmanship,  represents  the  figure  of  St  Laurence 
crowned  with  a  nimbus,  holding  a  book  (sic.  in  the  Cat.  of  Her.  Exn.,  but  query 
a  casket)  in  his  right  hand,  his  left  resting  on  a  gridiron.  In  the  field  are  a 
crescent,  a  star  of  six  points,  and  two  branches  of  foliage.  Legend,  "  Sigillum 
commune  burgi  de  Fores." 

FORTROSE  (Rossshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The 
seal  at  present  in  use,  which  is  circular;  represents  the  figures  of  St  Peter  and  St 
Boniface,  to  whom  the  Cathedral  Church  is  dedicated.  St  Peter  on  the  dexter 
side  has  a  halo,  and  is  holding  his  keys  over  his  dexter  shoulder.  St  Boniface 
on  the  sinister  side  is  wearing  a  mitre  and  holding  a  crosier  in  his  sinister  hand. 
A  more  ancient  seal,  which  is  oval  in  shape,  represents  St  Peter  only,  though 
this  time  in  a  mitre. 

FORT  WILLIAM,  formerly  MARYBURGH  (Inverness-shire).  Has  no  arms. 
The  seal  shows  a  device  of  two  Lochaber  axes  in  saltire  entwined  by  a  wreath  of 
oak.    Motto — "  A  dh'  aindeoin  co  theireadh  e,"  meaning,  "  Gainsay  it  who  dare." 


292 


FLORENCE 


FORFAR 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

FOUNDERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  i8th 
September  1614.)  Azure,  a  laver-pot  between  two  taper  candlesticks  or. 
Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  fiery  furnace  proper,  two  arms  of  the  last 
issuing  from  clouds  on  the  sinister  side  of  the  first,  vested  azure,  holding  in  both 
hands  a  pair  of  closing  tongs  sable,  taking  up  the  melting-pot  in  the  furnace 
also  proper.     Motto — "  God  the  only  founder." 

[Granted  by  Robert  Cooke,  Clarenceux,  13th  October  1590,  for  which  they 
paid  £1,  2s.  8d.  Confirmed,  approved,  and  entered  by  Henry  St  George  at  the 
Visitation  of  London,  1634.    The  grant  is  printed  in  "  Misc.  Gen.  et  Her,"  i.  103.] 

FOUNDLING  HOSPITAL  (The  Hospital  for  the  Maintenance  and  Education  of 
Exposed  and  Deserted  Young  Children,  London).  Per  fesse  azure  and  vert, 
a  young  child  lying  naked  and  exposed,  extending  its  right  hand  proper,  in  chief 
a  crescent  argent  between  two  mullets  of  six  points  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of 
the  colours,  a  lamb  argent,  holding  in  its  mouth  a  sprig  of  thyme  proper. 
Supporters — (Dexter)  a  terminal  figure  of  a  woman  full  of  nipples  proper  with 
a  mantle  vert,  the  term  argent,  being  the  Emblem  of  Nature ;  (sinister)  the 
Emblem  of  Liberty,  represented  by  Britannia  holding  in  her  right  hand  upon  a 
staff"  proper  a  cap  argent,  and  habited  in  a  vest  azure,  girt  with  a  belt  or,  the 
under  garment  gules.     Motto — "  Help." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  1747;  Gts.  ix.  237.] 

FOWEY  (Cornwall).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Berry,  in  his  "  Dictionary  of 
Heraldry,"  says,  "The  seal  seems  to  be  originally  intended  for  an  armorial  en- 
sign, viz.,  on  a  shield  a  ship  of  three  masts  on  the  sea,  her  topsail  furled.  The 
legend  round  it,  'Sigillum  oppidi  de  Fowy,  Anno  Dom.  1702.'" 


294 


FOUNDERS,  COMPANY  OF 


FOUNDLING  HOSPITAL 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

FRAMEWORK  KNITTERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (In- 
corporated 13th  June  1657.)  Gules,  on  a  chevron  argent,  between  two  combs 
and  as  many  leads  of  needles  in  chief  and  an  iron  jack  lead  sinker  in  base,  a 
main  spring  between  two  small  springs.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a 
lamb  proper.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  student  of  the  University  of  Cambridge 
proper,  vested  sable  ;  (sinister)  a  woman  proper,  vested  azure,  neckerchief  apron 
and  cuffs  to  the  gown  argent,  in  her  dexter  hand  a  knitting-needle  and  in  her 
sinister  a  piece  of  worsted  knit  gules.  Motto — "  Speed,  strength,  and  truth 
united." 

The  foregoing  are  the  arms  as  in  use  at  the  present  day.  Rerry  in  his 
"Encyclopaedia  Heraldica,"  published  1828,  gives  these  arms,  "Argent  a 
knitting  frame  sable  garnished  or  with  work  pendent  in  base  gules."  He  cites 
no  crest,  and  calls  the  dexter  supporter  a  student  of  Oxford. 

Neither  version  is  of  any  authority. 

FRANCE,  Emperor  of.  Napoleon  Bonaparte,  First  Consul  of  the  French  Re- 
public, and  afterwards  Emperor  of  France,  assumed,  instead  of  the  fleurs-de-lis,  on 
an  escocheon  azure,  an  eagle  displayed  reguardant,  wings  expanded  and  inverted 
holding  in  the  claws  a  thunderbolt,  all  or.     Badges — A  bee :  a  violet. 

FRANCE,  King  of.  Anciently  azure,  seme  de-lis  or.  Modern  (changed  by 
Charles  IV.).  Axure,  three  fleurs-de-lis  or,  [sometimes  impaling  gules,  a 
double  orle,  saltire  and  cross,  composed  of  chains  from  an  annulet  in  the  centre 
point  or,  for  Navarre],  over  the  escocheon  a  helmet  or,  edged  and  damasked,  all 
open,  mantled,  or,  azure,  and  gules,  surmounted  with  a  royal  crown.  Supporters 
— Two  angels  standing  on  clouds,  all  proper,  vested  with  tabards  of  the  arms  ; 
the  dexter,  France,  the  sinister,  Navarre  ;  each  holding  a  banner  of  the  same 
arms,  afifixed  to  a  tilting-spear  ;  the  shield  encompassed  with  the  ensigns  of  the 
orders  of  St  Michael  and  of  the  Holy  Ghost :  the  whole  within  a  pavilion,  the 
mantle  azure  semee  of  fleurs-de-lis  or,  lined  with  ermine,  bordered,  fringed,  and 
tasselled  or ;  on  the  top  of  the  pavilion  a  royal  crown,  the  whole  surmounted 
with  a  split  waving  streamer  azure  semee  de  lis  or,  charged  with  a  sun  of  the 
last,  tied  to  a  pike  or,  terminated  in  a  double  fleur-de-lis  ;  over  all,  a  scroll  with 
this  motto,  "  Montjoye  et  St  Denis."     The  crest  of  France  is  a  fleur-de-lis  or. 

FRANCE,  Republic  of  No  legislative  Act  has  created  arms  for  the  French  Re- 
public, and  consequently  there  is  no  authoritative  emblem  that  can  be  cited. 
The  tricolour  flag  is  of  course  authoritative,  but  the  device  most  constantly 
in  use  for  the  Republic  is  the  device  of  the  flag  with  a  fasces  erect  on  the  centre 
stripe  between  the  letters  R  and  F  on  the  exterior  stripes. 

FRANCHIMONT.     Refer  to  Liege,  Bishopric  of 

FRANKFORT-ON-MAINE  (Germany).  Gules,  an  eagle  displayed  argent, 
crowned  and  armed  or. 

296 


FRAMEWORK  KNITTERS,  COMPANY  OF 


FRANKFORT-ON-MAINE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
FRANVILLE  (Hants).     See  Newtown,  Hants. 

FRASERBURGH  (Aberdeenshire).  Has  no  arms.  Those  on  the  seal  are  taken 
from  the  arms  of  Lord  Saltoun,  viz. :  i  and  4,  azure,  three  cinquefoils  ;  2,  or,  a 
lion  rampant  gules  debruised  by  a  riband  sable ;  3,  gules,  a  lion  rampant. 
Crest — An  ostrich  holding  in  its  beak  a  key.  Supporters — Two  angels.  Motto — 
"  In  God  is  all." 

FREBURG  or  FREIBURG,  Canton  (Switzerland).  Per  fesse  sable  and  argent. 
Supporter — Sinister,  a  Swiss  valet  proper. 

FREDERICTON,  See  of  (Canada).  Gules,  a  pastoral  staff  in  pale,  surmounted  by 
two  keys  addorsed  in  saltire  or,  on  a  chief  of  the  last  a  Fascial  lamb  with  its 
flag,  all  proper. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

FREEMASONS'  SOCIETY.  Use  the  following  arms,  crest,  and  supporters,  viz. 
— Sable  on  a  chevron  between  three  towers  argent,  a  pair  of  compasses  open 
chevronwise  of  the  first.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  dove  proper. 
Supporters — Two  beavers  proper. 

[Of  no  authority.     Refer  to  Masons'  Company.] 

FREEMASONS   (Gateshead-on-Tyne,   1671).     Same  arms.     Crest^A  tower  or. 
Motto — "  The  Lord  is  our  trust." 
[Of  no  authority.] 


298 


FREDERICTON,  SEE  OF 


FREEMASONS'  SOCIETY 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

FREEMEN  IN  THE  SUBURBS  ABOUT  LONDON,  The  Newe  Corpora- 
tion of.  Refer  to  the  "  Newe  Corporation  of  Freemen  in  the  Suburbs  about 
London." 

FREEMEN  OF  THE  CITY  OF  LONDON,  The  Guild  of.    Refer  to  London. 

FRENCH  MERCHANTS'  COMPANY.  (Incorporated  by  Edward  IV.) 
Quarterly  azure  and  gules,  in  the  first  and  fourth  quarters  a  fleur-de-lis  or,  in 
the  second  and  third  quarters  a  lion  passant  guardant  of  the  last,  over  all  a  cross 
argent.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  lion  rampant  guardant  or, 
supporting  an  anchor  sable,  beamed  of  the  first.  Supporters — Two  dolphins 
proper,  ducally  crowned  and  finned  or. 
[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.] 

FRENCH  MERCHANTS.     Refer  to  Merchant  Adventurers. 

FREYSING,  Bishopric  of  Argent,  a  demi-Moor  couped  below  the  .shoulders, 
issuing  from  the  base  in  profile  proper  habited  gules,  crowned  with  an  Eastern 
crown  or. 

FRIOUL,  Duchy  of.      Azure,  an  eagle  displayed  and  crowned  or. 

FRUITERERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.   (Incorporated  9th  January 
1606.)     Azure,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert  the  tree  of  Paradise  environed  with  the 
serpent  between  Adam  and  Eve,  all  proper.     Motto — "  Deus  dat  incrementum." 
[An  older  motto  is  "  Arbor  vitae  Christus  fructus  per  fidem  gustamus."] 
[Of  no  authority.] 


300 


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FRUITERERS,  COMPANY  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

FUH  KIEN,  See  of  (China).     Quarterly:  i.over  somewhere's  rocky  mountains  an 

angel  volant  carrying  a  book ;  2,  either  a  vegetable  or  a  branch  of  coral ;  3,  on 

rolling  waves  a  ship  in  full  sail ;  4,  an  eastern  crown  from  which  tears  are  falling. 

[Of  no  authority,  and  by  a  long  way  the  most  appalling  of  these  bogus 

arms  of  missionary  sees.] 

FULHAM,  Borough  of  (London).     Has  no  armorial  bearings.     Those  in  use  are, 
Quarterly  :   i  and  4,  landscapes  showing  bridges  ;  2,  two  swords  in  saltire,  points 
upwards  ;  3,  three  seaxes  fesseways  in  pale,  hilts  to  the  dexter. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

FULLERS'  COMPANY  (London).  Azure,  a  fesse  ermine  between  six  teazles, 
three  and  three  or. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

FURNIVAL'S  INN  (London).     Argent,  a  bend  between  six  martlets  gules,  all 
within  a  bordure  azure. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

FURRIERS  (Edinburgh).  Berry,  in  his  description  of  the  arms  on  the  Gold 
Medal  of  the  Deacon-Convener  of  the  Corporate  Bodies  of  Trades  in  Edinburgh 
(refer  sub  Edinburgh),  gives  for  the  Furriers  :  "  Ermine,  on  a  chief  gules,  three 
imperial  crowns  proper."  But  these  are  identical  with  the  arms  of  the  Skinners 
of  London  and  the  United  Glovers  and  Skinners  of  Exeter,  and  perhaps  Berry 
is  wrong,  and  that  the  arms  used  by  the  Furriers  are  those  he  ascribed  to  the 
Skinners,  viz.,  "  party  per  fesse  gules  and  argent,  a  pale  counter  changed  on 
first  three  goats  salient  of  the  second." 

[No  arms  are  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register.] 

FURRIERS'  GUILD  (Basle).     Gules,  a  bend  composed  of  three  rows  of  Kursch. 

GALASHIELS  (Selkirkshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The 
seal  represents  upon  a  mount  a  vine-tree  fructed  proper  and  seated  upon  either 
side  a  fox  gazing  at  the  fruit,  all  within  the  legend,  "The  Corporation  of  the 
Burgh  of  Galashiels."  [Does  the  fruit  typify  a  coat-of-arms  which  the  Borough 
can't  afford  ?] 

GALICIA,  Kingdom  of.  Azure,  a  fillet  in  chief  {i.e.  a  barrulet  enhanced)  gules, 
between  a  crow  sable  in  chief,  and  three  ancient  crowns  or  in  base. 

GALSTON  (Ayrshire).     Has  no  armorial  bearings.     Those  upon  the  seal  are  azure, 
a  cross  moline  argent,  on  a  chief  of  the  last  a  pick  and  shovel  in  saltire  proper. 
Crest — Two  shuttles  in  saltire  proper.     Motto—"  Lahore  et  fiducia." 
[Of  no  authority.] 


302 


FUH  KIEN,  SEE  OF 


FURNIVAL'S  INN 


GALASHIELS 


THE   BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 
GALLOWAY.     See  New  Galloway. 

GALLOWAY,  See  of.  Argent,  St  Ninian  standing  and  full  faced  proper,  clothed 
with  a  pontifical  robe  purple,  on  his  head  a  mitre,  and  in  his  dexter  hand  a 
crozier  or. 

[These  arms  were  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  c.  1675-9,  and  are  still  in 
use,  but  by  the  disestablishment  of  the  Episcopal  Church  in  Scotland  they  are 
really  extinct  and  their  present  use  is  improper.] 

GALLOWAY.     Refer  to  Glasgow  and  Galloway,  Bishop  of. 

GALWAY  (Co.  Galway).  Argent,  on  waves  of  the  sea  in  base  proper,  a  galley  or 
with  one  mast  and  sails  furled,  the  rigging  charged  with  an  escutcheon  sable 
charged  with  a  lion  rampant  or. 

[Recorded  in  Ulster's  Office  by  Christopher  Ussher,  c.  1678-98.] 

GALWAY,  County  of     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

GAMBIA.  No  warrant  has  as  yet  been  issued  assigning  arms  to  Gambia.  Refer 
to  Sierra  Leon. 

GARDENERS,  Worshipful  Company  of  (The  Master,  Wardens,  Assistants,  and 
Commonalty  of  the  Company  of  Gardeners  of  London — Existed  as  a  fraternity 
1345,  incorporated  Sept.  18,  1605).  On  a  shield  representing  a  landscape  the 
figure  of  a  man  habited  about  the  body  with  a  skin,  delving  the  ground  with  a 
spade  all  proper.  Crest — On  a  wreath  argent  and  vert,  a  basket  of  flowers  and  fruit 
proper.  Supporters — On  either  side  a  female  figure  proper  vested  argent,  wreathed 
about  the  temples  with  flowers,  and  supporting  on  the  exterior  arm  a  cornucopia 
proper.     Motto — "  In  the  sweat  of  thy  brows  shalt  thow  eate  thy  bread." 

[Adopted  on  Incorporation  :  Royal  Warrant  of  Confirmation,  9th  June 
1905.     Exemplified  College  of  Arms,  8th  September  1905.] 

GARDENERS'  GUILD  (Strasburg).  Argent,  a  bend  gules,  between  two  roses 
of  the  last,  seeded  or,  barbed,  leaved,  and  slipped  vert. 

GARTER  PRINCIPAL  KING  OF  ARMS.  Argent,  a  cross  gules,  on  a  chief 
azure,  a  ducal  coronet  encirled  with  a  garter  between  a  lion  passant  guardant 
on  the  dexter  and  a  fleur-de-lis  on  the  sinister,  all  or. 

[These  arms  of  office  are  either  borne  alone  or  impaled  on  the  de.xter  side 
of  the  personal  arms  of  Garter. 

The  escutcheon  is  surmounted  by  his  official  crown,  and  behind  it  in  bend 
is  placed  a  representation  of  his  sceptre  of  silver  gilt.] 


3°4 


GALLOWAY,  SEE  OF 


GARDENERS,  COMPANY  OF 


GALWAY 


GARTER  KING  OF  ARMS 


U 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

GATEHOUSE  OF  FLEET  (Kirkcudbright).     Has  no  armorial  bearings,  and  its 
_  seal  is  not  heraldic. 

GATESHEAD  (Durham).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  used,  which 
appear  upon  the  Corporation  seal,  are  as  follows,  namely.  Argent  on  a  mount 
an  embattled  gateway  all  proper,  and  for  a  Crest,  a  goat's  head  erased. 

GATESHEAD  TRADE  CORPORATIONS.  Refer  to  Masons,  Bricklayers  and 
Tylers,  Glaziers,  Marblers,  Paper-Stainers,  Pewterers,  Plumbers,  Saddlers. 

GATTON  (Surrey).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

GENEVA  (Switzerland).  Per  pale  dexter,  or,  a  dimidiated  eagle  displayed  sable, 
armed  and  crowned  gules ;  sinister  gules,  a  key  in  pale  wards  upwards  and  to 
the  sinister  or. 

GENOA  (Italy).     Argent,  a  cross  gules. 

[The  same  arms  were  used  by  tlie  former  republic  of  Genoa,  now  extinct, 
the  shield  being  then  surmounted  by  a  regal  crown  for  the  sovereignty  of 
Corsica.] 

GENTLEMEN-AT-ARMS,  Corps  of.     Gules  two  battle  axes  in  saltire  or,  in  chief 
a  crown  of  the  second,  lined  ermine.     Motto — "  Per  tela  per  hostes." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

GEORGE  HERIOT'S  SCHOOL  (Heriot  Hospital)  (Edinburgh).  Refer  to 
Heriot's  School. 

GEORGE  WATSON'S  COLLEGE.     Refer  to  Watson's  College. 

GEORGIA  (Russia).     Refer  to  Russia. 

GEORGIA  (U.S.A.),  State  Device.  On  a  rocky  shore,  upon  which  the  sea  is 
breaking  in  foam,  the  high  land  in  the  distance,  a  temple  supported  by  three 
figures  with  scrolls,  inscribed — Wisdom,  Justice,  and  Moderation  ;  over  the  dome 
the  word  "  Constitution,"  guarded  by  a  soldier  with  a  drawn  sword. 


306 


GENEVA 


GATESHEAD 


GENOA 


GENTLEMEN-AT-ARMS 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
GERMAINS,  ST.     See  St  Germains. 

GERMAN  EMPIRE.  As  usually  made  use  of,  "an  eagle  displayed  sable,  beaked 
and  legged  gules,  on  its  breast  surrounded  by  the  collar  of  the  Black  Eagle  an 
escocheon  argent,  charged  with  an  eagle  displayed  sable,  armed,  beaked,  royally 
crowned  and  with  Sachsen  or  holding  in  its  dexter  claw  a  sceptre  and  in  its 
sinister  an  orb  and  on  its  breast  an  inescutcheon  of  Hohenzollern,  quarterly 
argent  and  sable."     Above  the  eagle  is  the  Imperial  crown. 

In  the  great  shield  of  the  Emperor  the  foregoing  is  placed  upon  an  escocheon 
or,  and  the  Collar  of  the  Black  Eagle  surrounds  this  escocheon,  and  not  the  inner 
one.  Upon  the  escutcheon  is  placed  the  Imperial  crown.  Supporters — On  either 
side  a  wild  man  wreathed  about  the  temples  and  waist  with  oak  leaves  and 
supporting  banners  with  their  exterior  hands,  the  banners  staves,  and  fringes  or, 
the  dexter  banner  argent  charged  with  an  eagle  as  in  the  arms,  the  sinister  argent 
charged  with  an  eagle  displayed  gules,  crowned  with  an  electoral  bonnet  proper, 
beaked,  legged,  and  with  Sachsen  or,  holding  in  its  dexter  claw  a  sceptre  and  in 
its  sinister  a  sword  proper,  on  its  breast  an  inescutcheon  or,  charged  with  a  lion 
rampant,  a  bordure  gobony  gules  and  argent. 

Ihe  pavilion  is  of  gold,  seme  of  eagles  and  Imperial  crowns  alternately,  and 
lined  with  ermine,  carrying  the  motto  "  Gott  mit  uns,"  and  surmounted  by  the 
Imperial  crown  and  the  banner  of  sable,  argent,  and  gules. 

In  the  "  middle  "  shield  the  pavilion  is  omitted  and  the  banners  in  the  hands 
of  the  supporters  are  replaced  by  clubs.  The  Crown  Prince  adds  a  bordure 
gules. 

[Official  confirmation,  3rd  August  1S71.] 

GERMAN  EAST  AFRICAN  COMPANY.  A  lion  passant  in  front  of  a  palm- 
tree. 

GERMAN  SCHOOL  UNION  (Austria).  Per  fesse  sable  and  or,  a  fess  gules,  in 
chief  a  demi-sun  in  splendour  issuant  from  the  fess,  and  issuant  from  the  base 
and  surmounting  the  fesse  an  oak-branch  vert,  with  two  acorns  or  [1888]. 

GESTRIKLAND  (Sweden).     Argent,  semee  of  hurts,  a  reindeer  ppr. 


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THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

GHENT  (Belgium).  Sable,  a  lion  rampant  argent,  armed  and  langued  gules, 
crowned  and  collared  or. 

GIBRALTAR.  Azure,  between  two  pillars  a  castle  argent,  masoned  sable,  from 
the  gate  a  golden  key  pendant,  subinscribed  "  Plus  ultra."  [Refer  to  grant  to 
Lord  Heathfield,  1787,  "the  arms  of  Gibraltar"  being  granted  to  him  as  a  chief 
of  augmentation.]  But  the  arms  as  published  by  the  Admiralty  for  use  upon 
the  Union  Flag  by  the  Governor  are  "gules,  a  triple  towered  castle  proper,  and 
suspended  by  a  chain  from  the  gateway,  a  key  or.  Motto — "  Montis  insignia 
calpe." 

GIBRALTAR,  See  of.     Argent,  in  base  rising  out  of  waves  of  the  sea  a  rock  proper 
thereon  a  lion  guardant  or,  supporting  a  passion  cross  erect  gules,  on  a  chief 
engrailed  of  the  last  a  crozier  in  bend  dexter,  and  a  key  in  bend  sinister  or,  sur- 
mounted by  a  Maltese  cross  argent,  fimbriated  gold. 
[Gts.  xlvi.  179,  College  of  Arms.] 

GILLINGHAM,  Borough  of  (Kent).  Argent,  a  cross  gules,  in  the  first  quarter  an 
ancient  harp,  in  the  second,  on  waves  of  the  sea  an  ancient  ship,  in  the  third 
issuing  out  of  waves  of  the  sea  a  rock,  thereon  a  fort,  and  in  the  fourth  quarter  a 
sprig  of  broom,  all  proper.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  in  front  of  a 
fouled  anchor  erect,  two  swords  in  saltire  points  upwards,  that  pointing  to 
the  dexter  sheathed  all  proper.  Motto — "  With  fort  and  fleet  for  home  and 
England." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  April  22,  1904.] 


310 


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GIBRALTAR 


GIBRALTAR,  SEE  OF 


GILLINGHAM 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

GIPPSLAND,  See  of  (Australia).    Azure,  on  a  chevron  argent,  an  open  book  proper, 
on  a  chief  of  the  second,  a  swan  naiant  in  water  all  proper,  a  bordure  also  argent. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

GIRDLERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London,  (Incorporated  loth  March 
1327.)  Per  fesse  azure  and  or,  a  pale  counterchanged  and  three  gridirons  of 
the  last,  the  handles  in  chief.  Alantliiig — Azure,  lined  ermine.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  a  demi-man  proper,  representing  St  Lawrence,  with  a 
glory  round  his  head  or,  issuing  out  of  clouds  of  the  first,  vested  azure,  girt 
round  the  body  with  a  girdle  of  the  second,  holding  in  his  dexter  hand  a 
gridiron  of  the  last  and  in  the  sinister  a  book  argent.  Motto — "  Give  thanks 
to  God." 

[Granted  by  John  Smert,  Garter,  1454.] 

GIRVAN  (Ayrshire).     Has  no  arms.     The  seal  shows  an  escutcheon,  thereon  a  three- 
masted  ship  in  full  sail  on  waves  of  the  sea. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

GLAMORGANSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  Clerk  of  the  County 
Council  informs  me  that  "  the  Seal  adopts  the  Arms  of  De  Clare,  who  were 
(sic)  Lords  of  Glamorgan."  These  are,  of  course,  the  arms  Cardiff  formerly 
assumed.  It's  a  pity  they  couldn't  find  a  better  example  to  copy,  particularly 
as  the  City  of  Cardiff  has  now  seen  the  error  of  its  ways. 

GLASGOW,  PORT.     See  Port  Glasgow. 


312 


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GIRDLERS,   COMPANY  OF 


■:;  J 


GIRVAN 


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GLASGOW.  Argent,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert  an  oak-tree  proper,  the  stem  at  the 
base  thereof  surmounted  by  a  salmon  on  its  back  also  proper,  with  a  signet-ring 
in  its  mouth  or,  on  the  top  of  the  tree  a  redbreast,  and  in  the  sinister  fesse  point 
an  ancient  hand-bell,  both  also  proper.  Above  the  shield  is  placed  a  suitable 
helmet  with  a  mantling  gules  doubled  argent,  and  issuing  from  a  wreath  of  the 
proper  liveries  is  set  for  Crest — The  half-length  figure  of  Saint  Kentigern 
affronte,  vested  and  mitred,  his  right  hand  raised  in  the  act  of  benediction,  and 
having  in  his  left  hand  a  crozier,  all  proper.  On  a  compartment  below  the 
shield  are  placed  for  Supporters — Two  salmon  proper,  each  holding  in  its  mouth 
a  signet-ring  or,  and  in  an  escroll  entwined  with  the  compartment  this  Motto — 
"  Let  Glasgow  Flourish."     Matriculated  the  25th  day  of  October  1866. 

The  following  legends,  taken  from  a  newspaper  cutting,  are  quoted  for  what 
they  may  be  worth  : — 

The  armorial  insignia  of  Glasgow  are  richly  storied,  the  different  emblems 
referring  to  several  legends  in  the  life  of  St  Kentigern,  otherwise  called  Mungo, 
who  was  the  first  Bishop  of  Glasgow,  and  died  about  A.D.  602.  The  tree  repre- 
sents the  bough  which,  according  to  an  old  story,  St  Kentigern  kindled  by  his 
word  into  a  blaze  in  order  to  relight  the  church  lights,  which  some  of  his 
enemies  had  put  out.  The  bird  perched  upon  the  tree  is  a  robin,  the  pet  of  St 
Serf,  which  St  Kentigern  restored  to  life,  as  the  tradition  goes.  The  bell  which 
hangs  from  the  tree  signifies  the  Church  and  See  of  Glasgow,  founded  by  St 
Kentigern. 

[Another  account  gives  a  more  probable  explanation  as  follows :  "  The 
bell  is  the  consecrated  one  that  was  brought  from  Rome  by  St  Mungo  when  he 
visited  the  sacred  city  in  his  later  years,  and  which  was  placed  in  the  College 
buildings,  and  preserved  in  Glasgow  till  the  Reformation,  or  perhaps  to  a  later 
date.  It  was  called  St  Mungo's  Bell,  and  was  tolled  through  the  city  to  warn 
the  inhabitants  to  pray  for  the  repose  of  a  departed  soul."] 

But  the  most  romantic  legend  of  all  is  associated  with  the  salmon  bearing 
the  ring  in  its  mouth.  It  happened  that  the  Queen  of  Cadzow  had  given  away 
a  ring  which  she  had  received  as  a  present  from  the  King,  her  husband,  to  a 
certain  knight.  The  King  suspecting  this,  and  being  very  much  angered  at 
such  conduct,  considered  how  he  might  best  punish  it.  One  day  when  they 
were  all  out  for  a  hunting  party  along  the  banks  of  the  Clyde,  the  knight  to 
whom  the  Queen  had  given  the  ring,  overcome  with  fatigue,  fell  asleep  under 
the  shelter  of  a  tree.  The  King  seized  the  opportunity  to  look  into  the  knight's 
pouch,  and  there,  as  he  had  expected,  he  found  the  ring.  Wroth  beyond 
measure  that  the  Queen  should  so  have  treated  the  ring  he  had  given  her,  he 
flung  it  into  the  river.  Returning  home,  he  demanded  the  ring  of  the  Queen, 
and  said  she  should  be  put  to  death  if  she  did  not  give  it  him.  She  immediately 
sent  her  maid  to  the  knight  to  ask  for  it,  but,  of  course,  he  could  no  longer  find 
it.  The  Queen  knew  not  which  way  to  turn.  At  last,  she  bethought  herself  of 
the  good  Bishop  Kentigern.  She  avowed  her  fault  to  him,  and  convinced  him 
that  she  was  deeply  sorry  for  it,  and  asked  his  advice  and  help.     The  good 

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THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

man  believed  in  her  sincerity  and  took  compassion  upon  her.  He  immediately 
sent  one  of  his  people  to  fish  in  the  river  and  to  bring  him  the  first  fish  he 
should  catch.  The  angler  soon  returned,  and  laid  a  huge  salmon  at  the  feet  of 
the  bishop,  who  took  from  its  mouth  the  very  ring  which  the  King  had  flung 
into  the  Clyde.  The  Queen,  receiving  the  ring  from  the  bishop,  together  with 
his  blessing,  hastened  to  take  it  home  to  her  husband,  and  thus  her  life  was 
saved  by  the  good  Bishop  Kentigern. 

Before  the  matriculation  above  mentioned  the  arms  were  frequently  to  be 
found  with  the  field  "  party  per  fesse  argent  and  gules." 

The  "  Ordnance  Gazetteer  of  Scotland,"  referring  to  the  arms,  says : 
"These  tokens  appear  on  the  Seals  of  the  Bishops  of  Glasgow  in  the  I2th  and 
13th  centuries,  from  which  they  were  transferred  to  the  Common  Seal  of  the 
city  in  the  beginning  of  the  14th." 

GLASGOW,  See  of.  Argent,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert  an  oak-tree  proper,  the  stem  at 
the  base  thereof  surmounted  by  a  salmon  on  its  back  also  proper  with  a  signet 
ring  in  its  mouth  or,  on  the  top  of  the  tree  a  redbreast  and  in  the  sinister  fesse 
point  an  ancient  hand-bell  both  also  proper. 

[No  arms  were  ever  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register  for  the  See  of  Glasgow. 
Archbishop  Burnet,  who  matriculated  his  arms  c.  1672-7,  did  so  without  any 
Episcopal  impalement.  But  the  device  above  quoted  appears  upon  some  early 
Episcopal  seals.] 

GLASGOW,  Merchants'  House  of.  Gules,  a  terrestrial  sphere  argent,  encircled 
by  an  equatorial  band  cotised  sable,  charged  with  the  signs  of  the  Zodiac 
of  the  last,  en  surtout  an  escutcheon  parted  per  fess  argent  and  gules,  from 
a  mount  in  base  an  oak  tree,  the  stem  surmounted  of  a  salmon  on  its  back  with 
a  signet  ring  in  its  mouth,  on  the  top  of  the  tree  a  robin  redbreast,  and  in 
the  sinister  fess  point  an  ancient  hand-bell  all  proper,  in  base  below  the  sphere 
a  merchant's  mark  resembling  the  figure  4  of  the  second.  Maiitling — Gules, 
doubled  argent.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  liveries  a  full-rigged  ship  in  full  sail 
proper,  flagged  gules,  and  in  an  escrol  over  the  same  this  JMotto — "  Toties 
redeuntis  eodem." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  27th  February  1912.] 

GLASGOW  TRADES  HOUSE.  Parted  per  fesse  argent  and  gules,  on  a  mount 
in  base  an  oak  tree,  the  stem  at  the  base  thereof  surmounted  of  a  salmon  on 
its  back  with  a  signet  ring  in  its  mouth,  on  the  top  of  the  tree  a  robin  red- 
breast, and  in  the  sinister  fess  point  an  ancient  hand-bell  all  proper.  Mantling — 
Gules  doubled  argent.  Crest — A  sheaf  of  14  arrows  in  sheaf,  points  upwards  or, 
banded  azure.     Motto — "  Union  is  strength." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  19th  August  191 1.] 

GLASGOW  FACULTY  OF  PROCURATORS.     Refer  to  Procurators. 

316 


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GLASGOW,  MERCHANTS'   HOUSE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

GLASGOW  ACADEMY  (Glasgow).  Has  no  arms,  but  uses  on  an  escutcheon 
the  device  of  an  inescutcheon  bearing  a  cypher  of  the  letters  G.A.,and  supported 
by  the  supporters  of  the  city  of  Glasgow.  Above  the  inescutcheon  in  place  of  a 
crest  is  the  oak  tree  with  robin,  bell,  and  salmon  as  displayed  in  the  City  arms. 

GLASGOW  HIGH  SCHOOL.  Has  no  arms.  Those  in  use  are:  Or,  a  tree 
eradicated  and  surmounted  by  a  bird  between  in  fesse  on  the  dexter  side  a  closed 
book  and  on  the  sinister  a  bell  all  proper,  on  a  chief  vert  three  salmon  interlaced 
in  triangle  also  proper.     Motto — "  Hsec  summa  est." 

GLASGOW   ROYAL  TECHNICAL   COLLEGE.      Azure,  a  saltire   argent,  in 
chief  an  imperial  crown  proper,  and  in  base  a  pair  of  scales  or.    Motto — "  Mente 
et  manu."     Refer  to  Royal  Technical  College. 
[Matriculated  Lyon  Office,  nth  July  1912.] 

GLASGOW  UNIVERSITY.     See  University  of  Glasgow. 

GLASGOW.  Refer  to  Edinburgh  and  Glasgow  Bank  and  Royal  Faculty  of 
Physicians  and  Surgeons  of  Glasgow. 

GLASGOW  AND  GALLOWAY,  Bishop  of.     According  to  Crockford  the  arms 
in  use  are  per  pale  dexter  the  arms  of  the  City  of  Glasgow,  and  sinister  the  arms 
,  of  Galloway  (to  which  refer).     This  device  is  quite  unauthorised. 

GLASS-SELLERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  28th 
November  1661.)  Has  no  legal  arms.  A  device  is  used  upon  a  shield  invented 
by  the  company  which  it  is  quite  impossible  to  describe  in  heraldic  language. 
Motto — "  Discordia  frangimur." 

GLASTONBURY  (Somerset).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  corporation, 
notepaper  represents  upon  an  escutcheon  a  mitre  labelled  in  front  of  two 
croziers  in  saltire.     No  colours  are  shown.     Motto — "  Floreat  ecclesia  anglicana." 

GLAURUS,  Canton  (Switzerland).  Gules,  a  pilgrim  proper,  habited  argent,  corded 
or.     Supporter — Dexter,  an  angel  proper. 


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GLAZIERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  6th  November 
1 631).  Argent,  two  glazing  irons  in  saltire  sable,  between  four  closing  nails  of 
the  last,  on  a  chief  gules,  a  lion  passant  guardant  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath 
of  the  colours,  a  lion's  head  couped  or,  between  two  wings  expanded  azure. 
Supporters — Two  naked  boys  proper  each  holding  in  his  exterior  hand  a  long 
torch  inflamed  of  the  last.  Motto — "  Lucem  tuam  da  nobis,  O  Deus  "  (other 
mottoes  are  "  Da  nobis  lucem  Domine  "  and  "  Lumen  umbra  Dei  "). 
[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.] 

GLAZIERS  (Gateshead).  Argent,  two  glazing  irons  in  saltire  between  four  closing 
nails  sable  on  a  chief  gules,  a  lion  passant  guardant  or.  Crest — A  lion's  head  couped 
between  two  wings  expanded  or.  Supporters — Two  naked  boys  proper,  each 
holding  a  long  torch  inflamed  or. 

[Of  no  authority:  taken  from  the  Gateshead  Charter,  1671.] 

GLENALMOND,  Trinity  College.  Azure,  a  saltire  argent,  between  the  sun  in  his 
splendour  in  chief  and  a  fleur-de-lis  in  base  and  two  crescents  in  fesse  or. 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  isth  September  1898.     The  grant  is  printed 
in  extenso  in  The  Glenalmond  Chronicle  for  January  1899.] 

GLENDALOUGH.     Refer  to  Dublin,  Glendalough,  and  Kildare,  Archbishop  of. 

GLENLIVET  DISTILLERY.     See  Dailuaine  Glenlivet  Distillery,  Limited. 

GLOSSOP  (Derbyshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  corporation 
represents  upon  a  chapeau  proper  a  lion  statant  guardant  with  tail  extended, 
and  underneath  the  motto,  "  Virtus  Veritas  libertas."  The  above  crest  is,  of 
course,  that  of  Lord  Howard  of  Glossop  ;  it  would  be  interesting  to  know  if  any 
member  of  the  Howard  family  sanctioned  this  appropriation. 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

GLOUCESTER,  See  of.     Azure,  two  ke}'s  in  saltire,  the  wards  upwards  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 


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GLENALMOND,  TRINITY  COLLEGE 


GLOUCESTER,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

GLOUCESTER  AND  BRISTOL,  See  of.  Per  pale  azure  and  sable,  on  the 
dexter  two  keys  in  saltire,  the  wards  upwards,  and  on  the  sinister  three  ducal 
coronets  in  pale  or. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms — Exemplified  by  Royal  Licence,  8th 
November  1836,  on  the  amalgamation  of  the  two  Sees.] 

GLOUCESTER,  Dean  of.  Azure  on  a  fesse  or,  three  crosses  pattee  fitch^e  of  the 
first,  on  a  quarter  (or  canton)  of  the  second  issuant  to  the  dexter  and  sinister  a 
demi  fleur-de-lis  conjoined  to  the  side  of  the  first,  and  issuant  in  chief  a  demi- 
sun  in  splendour  argent.  [The  authority  for  the  foregoing  is  doubtful.]  Wood- 
ward gives,  Argent,  three  chevrons  gules  between  ten  torteaux.  [Of  no  authority 
at  all.] 

GLOUCESTER  (Gloucestershire).  Or,  three  chevrons  gules,  between  ten 
torteaux,  three,  three,  three,  and  one.  Ci-est — Out  of  a  mural  coronet  issuant 
a  lion  guardant  gules,  holding  in  his  dexter  gamb  a  broad-sword  erect  proper, 
and  in  the  sinister  gamb  a  trowel.  Supporters — On  both  the  dexter  and  sinister 
sides  a  lion  rampant  gules,  each  holding  in  his  dexter  gamb  a  broad-sword  erect 
proper.     Motto — "  Fides  invicta  triumphat." 

The  coat-of-arms  is  said  to  have  been  confirmed,  and  the  supporters  and 
crest  granted,  14th  August  1652,  by  Sir  Edward  Bysshe,  Garter  Principal  King 
of  Arms,  but  neither  the  crest  nor  the  supporters  are  recorded  in  the  College  of 
Arms.  This  is  probably  due  to  the  fact  that  the  grant  was  made  during  the 
time  of  the  Commonwealth,  and  all  grants  made  during  that  time  were 
subsequently  declared  void  and  of  none  effect.  The  chevronels  were  probably 
taken  from  the  arms  of  the  Earls  of  Gloucester,  and  the  torteaux  from  the 
arms  of  the  See  of  Worcester.  These  appear  to  have  been  the  arms  used  by 
the  city  of  Gloucester  from  a  very  remote  period.  But  Sir  Thomas  Bell, 
Knight,  Alderman  of  the  City  of  Gloucester,  obtained  for  the  corporation  in  the 
reign  of  Henry  VIII.  the  following  coat-of-arms :  "  Vert,  on  a  pale  or,  between 
two  horse-shoes,  each  horse-shoe  between  three  nails,  two  in  chief  and  one  in 
base,  all  meeting  with  their  points  to  the  shoe  argent,  a  sword  in  a  scabbard 
azure,  hilt,  pommel,  and  studding  of  the  scabbard  or,  on  the  point  of  the  sword 
a  cap  of  maintenance  gules,  turned  up  ermine,  on  a  chief  per  pale  or  and  gules 
a  boar's  head  couped  argent  between  two  demi-roses,  the  dexter  gules  barbed 
vert,  the  sinister  of  the  third  also  barbed  vert,  each  issuing  rays  from  its  centre 
pointing  to  the  boar's  head  or."  This,  which  was  granted  by  Barker,  Garter, 
1538,  30  Henry  VIII.,  is  the  coat  which  (though  tinctured  wrongly)  Burke 
and  Berry  give.  Both  coats  (the  former,  of  course,  without  crest  or  supporters) 
are  recorded  in  the  "  Visitation  "  with  the  following  note,  "  The  auntient  and 
moderne  Coates  of  Armes  belonging  to  the  Cittie  and  Countie  of  the  Cittie 
of  Gloucester,  the  former  taken  in  imitation  of  the  illustrious  family  of  the 
Clares,  Earles  of  Gloucester,  their  bountiful  benefactors.  The  latter  procured 
by  Sr.  Thomas  Bell,  Knight  and  Alderman  there  in  the  tyme  of  Henry  the 
eighth." 


GLOUCESTER,  DEAN  OF 


GLOUCESTER  AND  BRISTOL,  SEE  OF 


GLOUCESTER 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

GLOVERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  loth  September 
1639.)  Per  fesse  sable  and  argent,  a  pale  counterchanged,  three  rams  salient  of 
the  second  two  and  one,  armed  and  unguled  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  a  ram's  head  argent,  armed  or,  issuing  from  a  basket  of  the  last  full  of 
wool  proper,  between  two  angel's  wings  expanded  gules. 
[Granted  by  John  Smert,  Garter,  loth  October  1464.] 

GLOVERS  AND  SKINNERS,  United  Company  of,  Exeter.  Ermine,  on  a  chief 
gules,  three  regal  crowns  or.     Motto — "  Soli  Deo  gloria." 

[These,  which  are  recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms,  are  the  same  as  the 
arms  of  the  Skinners'  Company  of  London,  to  which  refer.] 

GODALMING  (Surrey).  Party  per  pale  gules  and  sable,  a  woolpack  argent,  on  a 
chief  of  the  last,  a  rose  of  the  first,  barbed  and  seeded  proper,  between  two 
escocheons  also  gules,  that  on  the  dexter  charged  with  a  fesse  dancettee  between 
two  crosses  pattee  in  palt  of  the  third,  and  that  on  the  sinister  charged  with 
three  pears  in  bend  leaved  and  slipped  proper.  Cj-est — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  a  mound,  thereon  a  ram  statant  holding  in  the  mouth  a  pear  leaved  and 
slipped  all  proper,  suspended  from  the  neck  by  a  riband  gules  an  escocheon  or, 
charged  with  a  pair  of  shears  erect  points  upwards,  also  proper.  Motto — "  Libera 
deinde  fidelis." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  12th  June  1893.] 

GODMANCHESTER  (Huntingdonshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal 
represents  a  fleur-de-lis  with  trefoils  between  the  petals  within  the  legend, 
"Commune  Sigillum  G'mecestre." 

GOLD  AND  SILVER  WYRE  DRAWERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of, 
London.  (Incorporated  i6th  June  1693.)  Azure,  on  a  chevron  or,  between  two 
coffers  of  the  second  in  chief  and  two  points  in  saltire  in  base  argent,  a  drawing- 
iron  between  two  rings  [i.e.  tools  used  by  the  craft)  sable.  Ciest — On  a  wreath 
of  the  colours,  two  arms  embowed  vested  gules,  cuffed  argent,  holding  between 
the  hands  proper  an  engiossing  block  or.  Supporters — (Dexter)  an  Indian 
proper,  crowned  with  an  Eastern  crown  or,  vested  round  the  middle  with  feathers 
pendant  alternately  argent  and  gules,  holding  over  his  shoulder  a  bar  of  silver ; 
(sinister)  a  man  vested  proper  ("  called  in  the  grant  a  silk  throwster"),  in  his  sinister 
hand  a  hank  of  silk  argent.     Motto — "  Amicitiam  trahit  amor." 

[These  arms  are  of  no  authority,  no  record  of  any  grant  or  confirmation 
being  in  existence  at  the  College  of  Arms.  The  blazon  is  taken  from  Burke's 
Armory,  which  has  the  note  referring  to  the  grant,  and  this  seems  to  have  been 
derived  from  Edmondson's  "  Heraldry."  How  it  can  have  originated  it  is  difficult 
to  imagine,  as  the  Company  knows  nothing  of  any  grant] 

GOLD  COAST  COLONY.  No  warrant  assigning  arms  has  as  yet  been  issued  to 
the  Gold  Coast  Colony.     Refer  to  Sierra  Leone. 


324 


GODALMING 


GLOVERS,  COMPANY  OF 


GOLD  AND  SILVER  WYRE  DRAWERS,  COMPANY  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

GOLDSMITHS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  1327.) 
Quarterly  gules  and  azure,  in  the  first  and  fourth  quarters  a  leopard's  face  or,  in 
the  second  and  third  a  covered  cup,  and  in  chief  two  round  buckles,  the  tongues 
fessewise,  points  to  the  dexter,  all  of  the  third.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  a  demi-lady,  her  arms  extended  proper  issuing  out  of  clouds  of  the  last 
vested  gules,  garnished  or,  cuffed  argent,  round  her  neck  a  ruff  of  the  last,  in  her 
dexter  hand  a  pair  of  scales  of  the  third,  in  her  sinister  hand  a  touchstone  sable 
Supporters — Two  unicorns  or,  armed,  crined,  and  hoofed  argent.  Motto — "  Justitia 
Virtutum  Regina."     (Another  motto,  "  To  God  only  be  all  Glory.") 

[The  crest  and  supporters  were  granted  by  Robert  Cooke,  Clarenceux, 
8th  November  1571,  and  the  whole  was  approved  and  entered  by  Henry  St 
George,  at  the  Visitation  of  the  City  of  London  in  1634.] 

GOLDSMITHS  OF  DUBLIN,  Company  of  Quarterly  :  i  and  4,  gules,  a  harp  or  ; 
2  and  3,  azure,  a  covered  cup  between  two  buckles  in  base  or.  Crest — A  demi- 
lady,  her  arms  extended,  issuing  from  clouds,  habited  per  fesse  gules  and  azure 
and  charged  on  the  breast  with  a  harp  argent,  in  her  dexter  hand  a  pair  of  scales 
or,  and  in  her  sinister  a  touchstone  sable,  her  head  irradiated.  Supporters — Two 
unicorns  argent,  armed,  crined,  and  unguled  or,  each  charged  on  the  shoulder 
with  a  harp  gules.     Motto— "Tg  radiante  virebimus." 

[Granted  by  Thomas  Preston,  Ulster  King  of  Arms,  July  24,  1638.] 

GOLDSMITHS'  TRADE  CORPORATION  (Edinburgh).  Qrly.  i  and  4  a 
leopard's  face  argent,  2  and  3  azure,  a  covered  cup  or,  in  chief  two  annulets  of  the 
last,  enriched  with  stones  gules. 

[Not  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register.     Refer  sub  Edinburgh.] 
This   is   evidently   a   variation   upon   the   London    Goldsmiths'    Company. 
Their  arms  are  based  upon  the  London   Hall-mark,  and  that  upon  the  Royal 
leopards,  hence  the  leopard's  face  for  Edinburgh  is  rather  ridiculous.     But  the 
copying  of  other  people's  arms  leads  to  these  little  follies. 

GONVILL  AND  CAIUS  COLLEGE  (Cambridge).  (Founded  in  the  year  1 348  by 
Edmund  Gonvill,  Rector  of  Terrington  and  Rushworth,  in  Norfolk,  who  called 
it  Gonvill  Hall.  Afterwards  it  was  further  amply  endowed  by  the  learned 
antiquary,  Dr  John  Caius,  who  obtained  leave  from  Queen  Mary  to  be  a  co- 
founder,  whereupon  it  was  called  Gonvill  and  Caius  College.)  Argent  on  a 
chevron  between  two  couple-closes  indented  sable,  three  escallops  or,  for  Gonvill, 
impaling  or,  semee  of  flowers  gentle,  in  the  middle  of  the  chief  a  sengreen  resting 
upon  the  heads  of  two  serpents  in  pale,  their  tails  knit  together,  all  proper 
colours,  resting  upon  a  square  marble  stone  vert  in  fesse  a  bible  bound  .sable, 
for  Caius,  the  whole  within  a  bordure  gobony  argent  and  sable.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  a  dove  argent,  beaked  and  membered  gules,  holding  in 
the  beak  by  the  stalk  a  flower  gentle  stalked  vert. 
[Granted  by  Robert  Cooke,  Clarenceux,  1571.] 


326 


GOLDSMITHS,   COMPANY  OF 


GOLDSMITHS'  TRADE  CORPORATION 


GONVILL  AND  CAIUS  COLLEGE 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

GOREY  (Co.  Wexford).  Party  per  saltire  argent,  gules,  or,  and  azure,  in  chief  a 
cross  of  the  second,  in  base  a  swan  with  an  eel  in  its  bill  of  the  first,  in  dexter 
fesse  point  a  lion  passant  guardant  of  the  third,  and  in  the  sinister  a  rose  of  the 
second,  seeded  proper  and  barbed  vert. 

Granted  November  24,  1613,  and  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office  in  the 
Visitation  of  Wexford  taken  in  the  year  1628. 

The  blazon  is  given  wrongly  in  Burke's  "  General  Armory." 

GORZ.  Per  bend,  in  chief  azure,  a  lion  rampant  or:  in  base  argent,  two  bends 
sinister  gules. 

GOTHENBURG  (Sweden).  Azure,  three  bends  sinister  argent,  over  all  a  lion 
rampant  to  the  sinister  regardant  and  crowned  or,  in  his  dexter  forepaw  a 
sword  proper,  and  on  his  sinister  an  inescocheon  azure,  charged  with  three 
open  crowns  or. 

GOTHLAND.     Refer  to  Sweden. 

GOULBURN,  See  of  (Australia).     Gules,  a  Paschal  Lamb  passant  upon  a  mount, 
above  it  an  open  book  with  seven  seals  proper  :  on  a  chief  or,  between  two  doves 
each  holding  a  sprig  of  olive  in  its  beak  proper,  a  pale  azure  charged  with  four 
estoiles  in  cross  argent. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

GOUROCK.  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  shows  a  device  of  the  arms  of  Stewart  and 
Darroch  impaled  and  above  the  crests  of  both  families.  Mottoes — "  Avant," 
"  Be  watchful," 


3^8 


GOREY 


GORZ 


GOTHENBURG 


GOULBURN,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

GOVAN,  Police  Burgh  of  (Lanarkshire).  The  following  Ensignes  Armorial: 
Argent,  the  hull  of  a  ship  on  the  stocks  proper,  on  a  chief  azure,  two  mullets 
pierced  of  the  field.  Above  the  shield  is  placed  a  suitable  helmet  with  a 
mantling  gules  doubled  argent,  and  on  a  wreath  of  the  proper  liveries  is  set  for 
Crest,  A  garb  surmounted  by  a  salmon  on  its  back  proper,  and  in  an  escroll  over 
the  same  this  Motto,  "  Nihil  sine  labore,"  and  on  a  compartment  below  the 
shield  are  placed  for  Supporters,  On  the  dexter  side,  an  engineer  holding  in  his 
exterior  hand  a  plan,  and  on  the  sinister  a  ship-carpenter  resting  his  exterior 
hand  on  a  mallet,  both  habited  proper. 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  7th  June  1884.] 

GRADISCA,  County  of.     Per  fesse  or  and  azure,  over  all  a  cross  moline  argent. 

GRAFTON  AND  ARMIDALE,  See  of  (Australia).     Azure,  at  the  intersection  ot 
the  arms  of  a  Passion  Cross  argent,  an  open  book,  in  chief  a  dove  volant  beak 
downwards  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

GRAHAMSTOWN,  See  of  (S.  Africa).  Argent,  a  cross  gules,  thereon  a  sword  in 
pale,  the  blade  wavy  proper,  in  the  dexter  canton  an  anchor  sable. 

[Arms  formerly  used  were  argent,  a  saltire  gules,  over  all  an  anchor  sable. 
There  is  no  authority  for  either  version.] 

GRAMPOUND  (Cornwall).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  a 
bridge  of  two  arches  over  a  river,  the  dexter  end  in  perspective  showing  the 
passage  over,  at  the  sinister  end  a  tree  issuing  from  the  base  against  the  bridge, 
on  the  centre  an  escutcheon  of  the  arms  of  the  family  of  Cornwall,  namely, 
argent,  a  lion  rampant  gules  within  a  bordure  sable. 

GRANADA  (Spain).     Argent,  a  pomegranate  leaved  proper,  seeded  gules. 

GRANGEMOUTH.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  shows  a  shield  per  pale 
or,  the  dexter  side  a  representation  of  "a  primitive  steamboat"  ;  sinister,  the 
arms  of  Dundas,  Lord  Zetland.  Ct'est — A  steamboat.  Motto — "Ingenium 
vincit  omnia." 


Zl^ 


GOVAN 


GRAFTON  AND  ARMIDALE,  SEE  OF 


GRAHAMSTOWN,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
GRANTHAM,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

GRANTHAM  (Lincolnshire).  Chequy  or  and  azure,  a  bordure  sable,  charged  with 
eight  trefoils  slipped  argent. 

Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms. 

GRANTON,  Port  and  Harbour  of.  (The  Duke  of  Buccleuch  as  proprietor  of) 
Parted  per  pale,  the  de.xter  side  parted  per  fesse  argent  and  or,  in  chief  a  merchant 
ship  with  three  masts  at  anchor  in  a  harbour  proper,  in  base  an  anchor  gules  : 
the  sinister  side  quarterly  i  and  4  or,  on  a  bend  azure,  a  mullet  between  two 
crescents  of  the  field,  2  gyronny  of  eight  or  and  sable,  3  argent,  a  galley,  oars  in 
action  sable,  flagged  gules. 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  1866.] 

GRANTOWN-ON-SPEY,  Police  Burgh  (Elgin).  Has  no  arms.  Those  in  use  are 
gules,  three  barrulets  wavy  argent,  between  as  many  antique  crowns  or.  Motto 
— "  Stand  fast." 

[Of  no  authority.] 

GRATZ  (Styria,  Austria).     Vert,  a  panther  rampant  and  incensed  argent. 
[?  if  these  are  not  really  the  arms  of  Styria.] 


332 


GRANTHAM  (LINCOLNSHIRE) 


GRANTON,  PORT  AND  HARBOUR  OF 


GRATZ 


GRANTOWN-ON-SPEY 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

GRAVESEND  (Kent).  Argent,  a  tower  gules,  charged  with  a  bull's  head  issuing 
from  a  ducal  coronet  both  or,  and  vomiting  flames  of  fire  proper,  all  within 
a  bordure  azure  charged  with  five  fleurs-de-lis  and  as  many  buckles  or. 

At  the  Visitation  of  Kent  in  the  year  1619,  the  following  arms  are  recorded, 
namely,  Vert,  upon  waves  of  the  sea  proper,  an  ancient  one-masted  ship,  the 
oars  in  action  and  rowers  visible  or,  the  mast  of  the  last,  the  sail  argent,  the 
r'gg'"?  also  proper,  and  standing  erect  in  the  stern  of  the  ship  a  porcupine 
collared  and  lined  :  but  William  Le  Neve,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms,  assigned 
the  first-mentioned  coat  to  the  town  in  the  year  1635,  to  commemorate  the 
connection  of  the  Duke  of  Lennox  therewith.  Motto — "  Decus  et  tutamen."  See 
Catalogue  of  Heraldic  Exhib.,  71. 

GRAY'S  INN  (London).     Sable,  a  grifiin  segreant  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

GREAT  BEDWIN  (Wiltshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Burke's  "  General 
Armory,"  however,  quotes,  "  Az.  a  tower  domed  ar."  Crest — A  griffin  passant 
or. 

GREAT  BRITAIN  AND  IRELAND,  The  United  Kingdom  of.  Since  Her 
Majesty  Queen  Victoria  ascended  the  throne,  the  armorial  bearings  have  been  : 
Quarterly  i  and  4  gules,  three  lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  or  (for  England)  ; 
2  or,  a  lion  rampant  within  a  double  tressure  flory  and  counterflory  gules  (for 
Scotland)  ;  3  azure,  a  harp  or  stringed  argent  (for  Ireland),  the  whole  encircled 
by  the  Garter.  Crest — Upon  the  royal  helmet,  the  lambrequin  being  of  cloth 
of  gold  lined  with  ermine,  the  imperial  crown  proper,  thereon  a  lion  statant 
guardant  or,  imperially  crowned,  also  proper.  Supporters — Upon  the  dexter 
side,  a  lion  guardant  or,  crowned  as  in  the  crest,  and  upon  the  sinister  side,  a 
unicorn  argent,  armed,  crined,  and  unguled  or,  gorged  with  a  coronet  composed 
of  crosses  pattee  and  fleurs-de-lis,  a  chain  affixed  thereto  passing  between  the 
forelegs  and  reflexed  over  the  back  of  the  last.  Motto — "  Dieu  et  mon  Droit," 
in  the  compartment  below  the  shield,  and  thereon  the  Union  Badge  of  the  Rose, 
Thistle,  and  Shamrock  engrafted  on  the  same  stem.  C^-est  of  Scotlmid — On 
an  imperial  crown  a  lion  sejant  affrontee  gules,  imperially  crowned  or,  holding  in 
the  dexter  paw  a  sword  and  in  the  sinister  a  sceptre  ensigned  with  a  fleur-de-lis, 
both  erect  and  also  proper.  Crest  of  Ireland — On  a  wreath  or  and  azure,  a 
tower  triple-towered  of  the  first,  from  the  portal  a  hart  springing  argent,  attired 
and  unguled,  also  or.  Badges :  Of  England — The  rose  of  York  and  Lancaster 
ensigned  with  the  imperial  crown  ;  of  Scotland — A  thistle  proper  ensigned  with 
the  imperial  crown  ;  of  Ireland — A  harp  or,  stringed  argent,  ensigned  with  the 
imperial  crown  ;  also  of  Ireland — A  trefoil  slipped  vert,  ensigned  with  the 
imperial  crown.  The  Union  Badge  of  the  Rose,  Thistle,  and  Shamrock  en- 
grafted upon  the  same  stem,  ensigned  with  an  imperial  crown  :  the  Union  Badge 
ensigned  with  the  imperial  crown,  namely,  azure,  a  saltire  per  saltire  argent  and 
gules,  the  latter   fimbriated   of  the   second,  over  all  a  cross  of  the  third,  also 

334 


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GRAVESEND 


GREAT  BEDWIN 


THE   BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

fimbriated  argent  (being  composed  of  the  crosses  of  St  George,  St  Andrew,  and 
St  Patrick).  The  badge  of  Wales,  namely,  on  a  mount  vert  a  dragon  passant 
with  wings  elevated  gules  ;  the  cypher  of  the  Sovereign  within  the  Garter  and 
ensigned  with  the  imperial  crown,  and  the  cypher  ensigned  with  the  imperial 
crown.     (See  Frontispiece). 

Wales  not  being  a  kingdom,  but  only  a  principality,  has  no  imperial  crown 
over  its  badge.  The  settlement  of  the  arms  by  an  Order  in  Council  is  one  of 
the  earliest  acts  in  the  reign  of  each  successive  sovereign. 

GREAT  CENTRAL  RAILWAY.  Argent,  on  a  cross  gules,  voided  of  the  field, 
between  two  wings  in  chief  sable  and  as  many  daggers  erect  in  base  of  the  second, 
in  the  fesse  point  a  morion,  winged  of  the  third,  on  a  chief  also  of  the  second 
a  pale  of  the  first,  thereon  eight  arrows  saltirewise  banded  also  of  the  third, 
between  on  the  dexter  side  three  bendlets  enhanced  and  on  the  sinister  a  fleur- 
de-lis  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  representation  of  the  front  of  a 
locomotive  engine  proper,  between  two  wings  or.  Motto — "  Forward." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  25th  F"ebruary  1898.] 

GREAT  GRIMSBY  (Lincolnshire).  Argent,  a  chevron  between  three  boars 
heads  couped  sable. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

GREAT  TORRINGTON  (Devonshire).  Argent,  in  base  two  bars  wavy,  over  all 
a  fleur-de-lis  within  a  bordure  engrailed,  all  sable.  Confirmed  by  Harvey, 
Clarenceux,  6th  September  1564,  and  also  recorded  at  the  Visitation  of 
Devonshire,  1620. 

Berry  makes  the  base  barry  wavy  of  six  argent  and  azure,  and  does  not 
engrail  the  bordure.  The  Corporation  notepaper  shows  the  fleur-de-lis  in  chief 
and  not  over  all. 


.^36 


GREAT  CENTRAL  RAILWAY 


GREAT  GRIMSBY 


GREAT  TORRINGTON 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

GREECE,  Kingdom  of.  Azure,  a  Greek  cross  couped  argent.  Stipporters — On 
either  side  the  figure  of  Hercules,  a  lion-skin  hanging  from  his  interior  shoulder 
and  supporting  with  his  e.xterior  hand  a  club  resting  on  the  ground,  all  proper. 

[The  Royal  Arms  of  Greece  are  usually  shown  surmounted  by  an 
inescutcheon  of  the  King's  personal  arms — refer  sub  Denmark — either  the  first 
quarter  alone  of  Denmark  or  the  full  quarterings.] 

GREENOCK  (Renfrewshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings. 
The  seal  represents  upon  the  sea  a  three-masted  ship  in  full  sail  between  two 
other  ships  upon  the  horizon.  In  the  foreground  is  a  quay,  upon  which  one 
man  is  rolling  barrels  under  the  directions  of  another  man. 

GREENLAND.     Refer  to  Denmark. 

GREEN  ROD,  Usher  of.     Refer  to  Usher  of  the  Green  Rod. 

GREENWICH,  Borough  of  (London).  Argent,  on  a  pale  azure,  between  six 
mullets  of  six  points,  three  on  either  side,  an  estoile  radiated  in  chief  and  an 
hour-glass  in  base,  all  counterchanged.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  in 
front  of  an  ancient  ship  of  one  mast,  sail  furled,  flags  flying  sable,  two  anchors 
in  saltire  or.     Motto — "Tempore  utimur." 

[Granted,  July  15,  1903,  by  Sir  Albert  Woods,  Garter,  G.  E.  Cokayne, 
Clarenceux,  and  William  H.  Weldon,  Norroy.] 

GRENADA.  No  warrant  assigning  arms  has  as  yet  been  issued,  but  the  Admiralty 
publishes  as  a  device  to  be  used  on  the  Union  flag  by  the  Governor,  a  sea- 
scape disc,  thereon  a  ship  in  full  sail  with  the  Motto — "  Clarior  e  tenebris." 

GRESHAM  COLLEGE.  Argent,  a  chevron  ermines,  between  three  mullets 
pierced  sable.     Crest — On  a  mount  vert,  a  grasshopper  or. 

These  arms  are  recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.  They  were  originally 
the  arms  and  crest  of  Sir  Thomas  Gresham,  the  founder  of  Gresham  College. 

GRESHAM'S  SCHOOL  (Holt).  Uses  two  escutcheons,  placed  side  by  side  : 
(Dexter)  the  arms  of  the  Fishmongers'  Company,  (sinister)  the  arms  of  Gresham, 
viz..  Argent,  a  chevron  ermines  between  three  mullets  pierced  sable  on  a  chief 
or,  a  trefoil  slipped  vert  between  two  griffins'  heads  erased  sable,  collared  gold. 
Motto — "  All  worship  be  to  God  only." 

[The  school  was  founded  by  Sir  John  Gresham,  and  is  managed  by  the 
Fishmongers'  Company.] 


338 


GRESHAM  COLLEGE 


GREENWICH 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

GREY  TAWYERS  COMPANY  (London).  Ermine,  on  a  chevron  sable, 
between  three  squirrels  proper,  with  beads  and  chains  of  gold  about  their  necks, 
three  roses  argent.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  squirrel  sejant  proper 
as  in  the  arms. 

[Granted  27th  September  1476  by  Holme,  Clarenceux,  and  confirmed  by 
Benolt,  Clarenceux,  nth  October  1531.J 

GRIMSBY.     See  Great  Grimsby. 

GROCERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Anciently  called  the 
Pepperers.)  (Incorporated  i6th  February  1428.)  Argent,  a  chevron  gules 
between  nine  cloves  sable,  three,  three,  and  three.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  a  camel  passant  proper,  bridled  gules,  on  his  back  a  bale  argent,  corded 
also  gules.  Supporters — Two  griffins  per  fesse  gules  and  or.  Motto — "  God 
grant  grace." 

[Arms,  crest,  and  supporters  granted  by  Thomas  Benolt,  Clarenceux,  1531.] 

GRONINGEN  (Germany).  Argent,  a  double-headed  eagle  displayed  sable,  on 
its  breast  an  inescutcheon  of  the  field  charged  with  a  fesse  vert. 

GUASTALLA,  Duchy  of  Argent,  a  cross  patee  throughout  gules,  between  four 
eagles  displayed  sable. 

[These  are  really  the  arms  of  Gonzaga,  Dukes  of  Mantua.] 

GUERNSEY.     Refer  to  Channel  Islands. 


340 


GROCERS,  COMPANY  OF 


GUASTALLA 


GRONINGEN 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
GUIANA.     Refer  to  British  Guiana. 

GUIANA,  See  of.     Argent  on  a  cross  azure,  a  Passion  Cross  or,  on  a  chief  gules,  a 
lion  passant  guardant  or,  holding  a  crozier. 
[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.] 

GUILD  OF  FREEMEN  OF  THE  CITY  OF  LONDON.     Refer  to  London. 

GUILD  OF  ST  JAMES.     Refer  to  Cook's  Company,  Dublin. 

GUILDFORD,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

GUILDFORD  (Surrey).  Sable,  on  a  mount  vert,  a  castle  with  two  towers 
embattled,  on  each  tower  a  spire  ;  from  the  battlements  of  the  castle  rising 
a  tower  triple-towered  all  or,  the  whole  betweeil  two  woolpacks  in  fesse  argent, 
the  base  barry  wavy  of  the  last  and  azure,  and  over  all  in  base  a  lion  passant 
guardant,  also  or. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

But  the  coat  as  it  is  frequently  made  use  of,  and  as  it  appears  upon  the 
seals  of  the  Town  and  of  the  County  Council  of  Surrey,  differs  in  several 
points,  agreeing  with  the  blazon  of  Burke  in  his  "General  Armory,"  namely:  — 

"  Guilford,  or  Guldeford,  Town  of  (Co.  Surrey). — Sa.  on  a  mount  vert  a 
castle  with  two  towers  embattled,  on  each  tower  a  spire,  surmounted  with  a 
ball  from  the  battlements,  between  the  towers  a  tower  triple-towered  all  an, 
and  charged  with  an  escutcheon,  quarterly,  of  France  and  England  ;  under 
the  battlements  of  the  castle  two  roses  in  fesse  or,  the  port  ppr.  charged  on  the 
centre  with  a  key  and  portcullised  both  gold,  on  the  mount  before  the  port 
a  lion  couchant  guard,  of  the  fourth,  on  each  side  the  castle,  in  fesse,  a  wool- 
pack  of  the   third   paleways,  the  base  of  the  field  water   ppr." 

GUILDHALL  FRATERNITY  (London).  Azure,  on  a  chief  gules,  a  leopard's 
head  cabossed  or,  langued  gules,  and  in  base  a  fleur-de-lis  of  the  third,  between 
two  holy-water  sprinklers  in  saltire  also  of  the  third,  and  argent.  Crest — Six 
holy-water  sprinklers  in  saltire  or  and  argent,  banded  of  the  first.  Mmitluig — 
Azure  and  gules  furred  with  ermine. 

[Granted  by  Holme,  Clarenceux,  July  i6,  1482  (22  Edward  IV.),  and  con- 
firmed by  Benolt,  Clarenceux,  1530,  22  Henry  VIII.] 

GUINEA.     Refer  to  British  New  Guinea. 

GUINEA,  NEW,  See  of     Azure,  a  sword  in  pale  point  upwards  surmounted  by 
two  keys  in  saltire  wards  upwards,  over  all  an  inescutcheon  gules,  charged  with 
a  native  boat,  the  sail  set  all  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 


342 


GUIANA,  SEE  OF 


GUINEA,  NEW,  SEE  OF 


GUILDFORD 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

GUNMAKERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  14th  March 
1637.)  Argent  two  guns  (muskets)  in  saltire  proper,  in  chief  the  cypher  C.  P.  (or  ? 
the  letter  G)  and  in  base  the  letter  V  sable,  each  crowned  with  a  regal  crown,  on 
the  dexter  side  in  fesse  a  barrel  and  on  the  sinister  three  balls  all  of  the  second. 
Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  dexter  arm  in  armour  holding  in  the  hand 
a  scimitar  all  proper. 

This  device  is  quite  unauthorised,  andBerry  in  his  " Encyclopaedia  Heraldica," 
says  of  it,  "  This  appears  to  be  a  composition  of  some  painter  and  not  a  proper 
armorial  ensign." 

GUVAN.     See  Govan. 

GUY'S  HOSPITAL.  (Corporation  for  the  Management  and  Disposition  of  the 
Charities  of  Thomas  Guy  of  London.)  Sable,  on  a  chevron  or,  between  three 
leopards'  heads  argent,  each  crowned  with  an  Eastern  crown  of  the  second,  as 
many  fleurs-de-lis  azure.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  woman  sitting 
accompanied  with  three  children  proper,  habited  azure,  being  the  emblem  of 
Charity.  Supporters — On  either  side,  an  angel  proper,  habited  argent,  the  hair 
and  wings  or,  each  holding  a  book  proper,  the  clasps  gold.  Motto—"  Dare  quam 
accipere." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  24th  May  1725.] 

GYMNASTS,  Society  of  German.  Or,  four  figures  of  the  letter  F  addorsed  in 
cross  sable. 

[Adopted  2nd  and  3rd  August  1846,  the  four  "  F's"  being  taken  from  the 
1 6th  century  rhyme — 

"  Frisch,  frei,  frolich  und  frumb 
1st  der  Studenten  Reichtum." 
"  Fresh,  free,  joyous  and  good  is  the  realm  of  the  students."] 


344 


GUNMAKERS,  COMPANY  OF 


GUVS  HOSPITAL 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

HAARLEM  (Holland).  Gules,  a  sword  in  pale  point  upwards  proper,  pomel  and 
hilt  gold  surmounted  by  a  cross  pattce  and  between  four  mullets  of  six  points, 
two  on  either  side  in  pale  argent. 

HABERDASHERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  3rd 
June  144S.)  Barry  nebuly  of  six  argent  and  azure,  on  a  bend  gules,  a  lion 
passant  guardant  or.  Cirsi— On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  two  arms  embowed 
proper,  issuing  from  clouds  of  the  last,  holding  a  chaplet  of  laurel  vert. 
Supporters — Two  Indian  goats  argent,  attired  and  unguled  or.  Motto — "  Serve 
and  obey." 

[Granted  by  Robert  Cooke,  Ciarenceux,  8th  November  1571,  confirmed  1634.] 

HABERDASHERS'  COMPANY  ( Exeter).  Used  the  arms,  crest,  supporters,  and 
motto  of  the  Haberdashers'  Company  of  London. 

HACKNEY,  Borough  of  (London).  Has  no  arms.  The  seal,  which  is  not  heraldic, 
shows  in  a  landscape  a  church  tower.     Motto — "  Justitia  turris  nostra." 

HADDINGTONSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  County 
Council  consists  of  a  monogram  of  the  letters  H.C.C.,  and  above  it  upon  a 
mount  a  goat,  all  within  the  legend  M.D.C.C.C.X.C. 

HADDINGTON  (Haddingtonshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial 
bearings.  The  seal  represents  upon  a  diapered  background  a  tree  growing 
from  a  mount,  and  on  the  dexter  side  thereof  a  goat  saliant  against  the  tree. 
The  legend  is  "David  D.  G.  Rex  Scottor.  Sig.  com.  burgi  de  Hadington." 
Another  seal,  within  the  legend  "David  Dei  Gratia  Rex  Scottorum.  Sigillum 
commune  burgi  de  Hadington,"  represents  two  escutcheons,  the  dexter 
bearing  a  king  crowned  and  seated  under  a  canopy,  resting  his  dexter  hand 
upon  a  shield  charged  with  a  lion  rampant  and  holding  in  his  sinister  hand 
a  sceptre.  The  sinister  escutcheon  is  charged  with  a  mount,  therefrom  issuing 
a  tree,  and  on  the  dexter  side  a  goat  saliant  against  the  tree.  The  following 
blazon  has,  however,  been  supplied  to  me,  but  it  is  not  authoritative :  "  Azure, 
on  a  mount  in  base  vert,  a  goat  statant  argent,  armed,  crined,  and  unguled  or." 

HADLEIGH  (Suffolk).  (Incorporated  by  Letters  Patent,  November  22,  1618.) 
"  Azure,  a  chevron  erminois,  between  three  woolsackes  argent.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  or  and  azure,  a  mount  vert,  thereon  a  lambe  standing  argent,  holding  a 
banner  azure  with  a  woolsacke  argent,  the  stafife  or  mantelled  argent,  doubled 
gules." 

[Granted  by  William  Camden,  Ciarenceux  King  of  Arms,  February  18, 
1618.  The  grant  is  printed  in  extenso  in  the  "Proceedings  of  the  Suffolk 
Archaeological  Institute,"  vol.  iii.,  p.  311.] 

HAGUE,  THE  (Holland).  Or,  a  stork  proper,  beaked  and  legged  gules  holding 
in  its  beak  a  serpent  proper. 

346 


HAARLEM 


HABERDASHERS,  COMPANY  OF 


HADLEIGH 


THE  HAGUE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

HAILEYBURY  COLLEGE  (Hertford).  (Incorporated  by  Royal  Charter,  1864.) 
Has  no  arms.  Those  in  use  are  azure,  an  open  book  proper  inscribed  with  the 
words  "  Sursum  corda  "  between  three  hearts  or,  winged  argent.  Refer  to  East 
India  College. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

HALIFAX  (Yorkshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  in  use,  which  are 
of  some  antiquity,  are,  Chequy  or  and  azure,  a  man's  face  with  long  hair  and 
bearded  and  dropping  blood,  and  surmounted  by  a  halo  all  proper,  in  chief 
the  letters  HALEZ  and  in  base  the  letters  FAX.  And  for  a  Crest  a  Paschal  Lamb. 
A  Motto  is  sometimes  used,  "Nisi  Dominus  custodierit  civitatem."  The 
lettering  varies,  being  sometimes  HALEG,  HALEY,  or  HALIZ.  The  last  form  is  as 
used  upon  the  seal,  but  the  head  is  not  placed  upon  an  escutcheon,  simply  upon 
a  plain  diapered  background  (not  chequy).  Upon  escrolls  on  the  seal  are 
the  words  "  Warren  "  and  "  Lewes,"  and  the  lamb,  which  here  simply  separates 
the  beginning  and  end  of  the  legend,  is  couchant  and  has  no  cross  or  banner. 
Appended  is  a  "  newspaper  cutting "  relating  to  the  arms,  but  the  editor  can 
accept  no  responsibility  for  its  accuracy,  and  simply  quotes  it  for  what  it 
may  be  worth  : — 

"  Halifax  strikes  us  at  once  as  being  what  French  heralds  call  '  allusive 
arms,'  or  arms  which  evidently  contain  an  allusion.  There  is,  however,  a 
disagreement  among  antiquaries  as  to  what  this  allusion  really  is  in  the  present 
case.  Halifax  is  known  to  mean  holy  hair  or  holy  face,  but  this  does  not 
much  help  to  clear  up  the  obscurity.  Some  maintain  that  the  head  represented 
on  the  shield  is  that  of  John  the  Baptist,  there  having  been  at  Halifax  ever 
since  the  introduction  of  Christianity  a  church  dedicated  to  that  saint,  and 
a  relic  of  his  head  preserved  there.  The  other  party  have  a  romantic  legend 
about  a  damsel  of  the  old  time,  of  renowned  virtue,  but  also  so  obstinate  as 
to  tax  the  patience  of  some  of  her  admiring  neighbours  beyond  endurance. 
One  of  them  was  so  vexed  that  he  cut  oft"  her  head  and  flung  it  into  a  tree. 
The  maiden  was  more  esteemed  in  death  than  she  had  been  in  life,  for  her 
memory  was  greatly  venerated.  A  church  was  built  in  her  honour  on  the 
spot  where  she  had  been  killed,  and  her  head  was  adopted  as  the  arms  of  the 
town." 

HALSTEAD  (Essex).     Has  no  armorial    bearings.      Burke's  "General  Armory" 
gives  "  Az.  a  coronet  composed  of  one  fleur-de-lis  and  two  leaves  or." 

HAMBROUGH  (/.c  HAMBURG)  MERCHANTS.     Refer  to  Adventurers. 


348 


HAILEYBURY  COLLEGE 


HALSTEAD 


HALIFAX 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

HAMBURG  (Germany).  Gules,  issuant  in  base  a  tower  and  from  the  battlements 
three  turrets,  the  centre  one  domed  and  surmounted  by  a  cross  and  above  each 
of  the  others  a  mullet  of  six  points  all  argent.  Mantling — Gules  and  argent. 
Crest — On  a  wreath  gules  and  argent  three  plumes  of  peacock  feathers  proper  in 
holders  or,  alternating  with  six  banners  of  the  arms.  Supporters — Two  lions 
rampant  regardant  proper. 

HAMILTON  (Lanarkshire).  Gules,  three  cinquefoils  pierced  argent.  Above  the 
shield  is  placed  a  suitable  helmet,  with  a  mantling  gules  doubled  argent,  and  on 
a  wreath  of  the  proper  liveries  is  set  for  Crest,  A  cinquefoil  pierced  as  in  the 
arms,  and  in  an  escroll  over  the  same  this  Motto,  "  Sola  nobilitat  virtus." 
Matriculated  in  Lyon  Office,  20th  July  1886. 

The  entry  in  the  Lyon  Register  recites,  "  That  the  Burgh  of  Hamilton  was 
Erected  into  a  Burgh  of  Regality  on  the  first  day  of  June  in  the  year  One 
Thousand  Six  hundred  and  Seventy  by  Charter  of  Ann  Duchess  of  Hamilton 
and  Lady  of  the  Dutchy  and  Regality  of  the  same,  with  consent  of  her  husband 
William,  Duke  of  Hamilton." 

HAMMERMEN,  The  Craft  and  Incorporation  of  (Aberdeen).  Gules,  a  dexter 
arm  issuing  from  the  sinister  flank  fesseways,  the  hand  holding  a  smith's  hammer 
proper,  hafted  argent,  and  over  it  a  crown  or,  in  the  dexter  nombril  point  a  smith's 
anvil  of  the  second  and  above  the  same  in  cheife  a  tower  of  Aberdeen.  Motto — 
"  Finis  coronat  opus." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  15th  May  1682.] 

HAMMERMEN,  Incorporated  Trade  (Edinburgh).  Azure,  a  hammer  erect  in 
pale  argent,  ensigned  with  a  ducal  coronet  or. 

[Not  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register.     Refer  sjib  Edinburgh.] 


350 


HAMBURG 


HAMMERMEN  (EDINBURGH) 


HAMILTON 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

HAMMERSMITH,  Borough  of  (London).  Party  per  pale  azure  and  gules,  on  a 
chevron  between  two  cross  crosslets  in  chief  and  an  escallop  in  base  argent,  three 
horse-shoes  of  the  first.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  upon  the  battle- 
ments of  a  tower  two  hammers  in  saltire  all  proper.  Motto — "  Spectemur 
agendo." 

[Granted  23rd  December  1897.] 

HAMPSHIRE,  otherwise  the  county  of  Southampton,  has  no  armorial  bearings. 
Those  of  the  town  of  Southampton  (to  which  refer)  are  frequently  quoted  and 
used  :  often  with  the  colours  reversed. 

HAMPSHIRE.     Refer  to  New  Hampshire,  U.S.A. 

HAMPSTEAD,  Borough  of  (London).     Has  no  arms.     Those  in  use  are  :  Azure, 
on  a  cross  argent,  a  mitre  between  four  fleurs-de-lis  gules,  a  chief  indented  or, 
fretty  also  gules.     Crest — A  buck's  head  couped  argent,  gorged  with  a  wreath  of 
holly  fructed  proper.     Motto — "  Non  sibi  sed  toti." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

HANLEY  (Staffordshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  On  the  old  Corporation 
notepaper  and  on  the  seal,  however,  the  following  somewhat  intricate  representa- 
tion appeared  :  Party  per  pale  and  per  chevron,  the  dexter  side  barry  of  six  or 
and  ermine,  three  jugs  proper  (or  perhaps  azure);  the  sinister  side  ermine  a  cross 
voided  sable  between  four  towers  flammant  proper,  the  base  gules  four  mullets, 
one  two  and  one  argent.  Crest — A  camel  kneeling,  bridled  and  burdened 
(or  perhaps  the  burden  was  intended  for  an  escutcheon  of  St  George)  proper. 
Around  the  escutcheon  was  a  cord  tied  in  what  one  must  imagine  was  the 
designer's  idea  of  indicating  the  locality  of  Hanley  by  a  series  of  Stafford  knots. 
It  was  decidedly  a  pretty  idea,  but  is  a  striking  example  of  the  truth  of  the 
old  adage,  "  A  little  knowledge  is  a  dangerous  thing,"  for  the  result  was  to 
surround  the  so-called  armorial  bearings  of  Hanley  with  a  very  close  re- 
semblance to  the  insignia  of  the  Order  of  the  Cordeliere  of  France,  which  was 
confined  to  widow  ladies  of  noble  family.  Hanley  now  forms  part  of  the 
Amalgamated  Borough  of  Stoke-on-Trent,  to  which  refer. 

HANCVER,  Province  of  (Prussia).  Gules,  a  horse  courant  argent.  Crest — Out 
of  a  coronet  a  pyramidical  cylinder  gules  ending  in  a  coronet  or,  issuing  there- 
from a  plume  of  peacock  feathers  proper,  charged  with  a  star  of  six  points  or, 
and  in  front  thereof  a  horse  courant  argent  between  two  sickles  of  the  same,  the 
handles  gules  issuing  from  the  coronet,  the  blades  adorned  on  the  outer  edges 
with  peacock  feathers.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  savage  holding  a  banner  of 
Prussia,  (sinister)  a  man  in  complete  armour  supporting  a  banner  of  Hanover 
as  above. 


352 


HAMMERSMITH 


HAMPSTEAD 


HANOVER,  PROVINCE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

HANNOVER,  Town  of  (Hanover,  Germany).  Gules,  upon  a  battlemented  wall 
surmounted  by  two  towers  argent,  a  lion  passant  or,  armed  and  langued  azure  : 
in  the  open  portway  of  the  wall  below  the  raised  portcullis  an  inescutcheon  or, 
charged  with  a  clover-leaf  vert,  the  point  of  the  leaf  towards  the  base  seeded 
and  veined  also  or.  Mantling — Gules  and  or.  Crest — Upon  a  wreath  gules  and 
or,  between  two  bufTalo  horns  the  de.xter  per  fesse  gules  and  or,  the  sinister 
counterchanged,  a  clover-leaf  as  in  the  arms.     Supporters — Two  lions  or. 

HANSE  TOWNS  (Germany).     Refer  to  Bremen,  Hamburg,  Lubeck. 

HAPSBURG.     Refer  to  Austria. 

HARROGATE  (Yorkshire).  Quarterly  argent  and  gules,  a  cross  counterchanged 
between,  in  the  first  and  fourth  quarters  a  fountain  proper,  and  in  the  second 
and  third  a  bugle-horn  stringed  or,  on  a  chief  per  pale  of  the  second  and  azure, 
a  lion  passant  guardant  of  the  first.  And  for  the  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  out  of  the  battlements  of  a  tower  a  trunk  of  a  tree  erect,  entwined  by 
two  serpents  respecting  each  other  proper,  surmounted  by  a  cock  sable,  combed 
and  wattled  gules.  Motto — "  Arx  Celebris  fontibus." 
Granted,  College  of  Arms,  8th  November  1884. 

HARROW  (Middlesex).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  following  are  used  : — 
"  Azure,  a  lion  rampant  argent."  Above  the  shield  is  placed  a  badge,  two 
arrows  in  saltire  argent,  tied  with  a  ribbon  gules,  and  interlaced  with  a  wreath 
of  laurel  or.  Motto,  "  Stet  fortuna  domus."  The  Vestry  Clerk,  Mr  William 
Winckley,  F.S.A.,  in  reply  to  a  request  for  a  copy  of  the  seal,  wrote  me  : — 

"  In  reply  to  your  letter  of  the  i  ith  inst.,  I  beg  to  inform  you  that  Harrow 
is  not  a  corporate  town,  and  therefore  has  no  corporate  Seal.  The  device  of 
Harrow  School  is  very  commonly  used  by  the  inhabitants  and  school  trades- 
men. The  oval-shaped  impression  [simply  showing  a  lion  rampant  within  the 
legend  "  Donorum  Dei  dispensatio  fidelis  "■ — Ed.]  is  a  copy  of  the  seal  of  the 
Governors  of  the  School,  and  the  one  with  crossed  arrows  over  the  lion  [as  the 
illustration — Ed.]  is  what  is  now  most  commonly  used.  You  will  observe 
the  arrows  are  not  a  crest,  but  are  merely  put  over  the  shield  in  allusion  to 
the  ancient  practice  of  archery  at  the  School,  which  has  long  since  been 
abolished.  [Has  the  palpable  pun  nothing  to  do  with  it? — Ed.]  The  assumed 
colour  of  the  shield  is  blue,  and  of  the  lion  white." 

HARROW  SCHOOL  (Harrow-on-the-Hill).  Argent,  a  lion  rampant  azure. 
Motto — "Stet  fortuna  domus." 

[Of  no  authority  ;  supposed,  but  quite  wrongly,  to  be  the  arms  of  John  Lyon, 
yeoman,  the  founder  of  the  school.] 

HARTLEPOOL,  WEST.     See  West  Hartlepool. 


354 


HANNOVER,  TOWN  OF 


HARROW  SCHOOL 


HARROGATE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

HARTLEPOOL  (Durham).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal,  which  is  of 
very  crude  workmanship,  represents  a  hart  standing  in  a  pool  towards  the 
sinister,  its  head  regardant,  and  on  its  back  a  dog.  The  legend  is  "  S'  com- 
munitatis  de  Herterpol." 

HARWICH  (Essex).  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  but  the  following,  which  appear 
upon  the  seal,  and  are  universally  made  use  of,  are  quoted  in  Burke's  ''  General 
Armory " :  "  Gu.  a  portcullis  with  chains  pendent  or,  nailed  and  pointed  az. 
Crest,  an  antique  ship  with  one  mast  or,  in  water  ppr.,  on  the  head  and  stern 
towers  an,  one  also  fixed  near  the  top  of  the  mast,  on  the  sinister  side  the  sail 
furled,  and  on  the  masthead  a  split  pennon  flotant  gu." 

HASLINGDEN  (Lancashire).  Quarterly  or  and  argent,  on  a  fesse  wavy  azure, 
between  a  lion  rampant  purpure,  holding  between  the  paws  a  quatrefoil  ermine 
in  the  first  quarter  ;  six  eagles  displayed  three  two  and  one  gules,  in  the  centre 
chief  point  a  rose  of  the  last  barbed  and  seeded  proper  in  the  second  ;  a  cog 
wheel  sable  in  the  third  ;  a  pickaxe  in  bend  surmounting  a  spade  in  bend 
sinister  entwined  by  a  chain  in  arch,  all  proper  in  the  fourth  ;  a  shuttle,  fesse- 
wise  of  the  first,  tipped  and  furnished  with  the  thread  pendant  of  the  second. 
Crest — Upon  a  mount  a  rock,  thereon  a  moorcock  holding  in  the  beak  a  sprig 
of  hazel  between  two  branches  of  hazel  fructed,  all  proper  Motto — "  Nothing 
without  labour." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  25th  March  1S92.] 

HASTINGS  (Sussex).     Party  per  pale  gules  and  azure,  a  lion  passant  guardaiit 
.or,  between  in  chief  and  in  base  a  lion  passant  guardant  or  dimidiated  with  the 
hulk  of  a  ship  argent. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

HAT-BAND    MAKERS'    COMPANY,    London.     (Incorporated    rst    December 
1664.)    Azure,  on  a  chevron  between  three  hat-bands  or,  as  many  merillions  sable. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

HAVERFORDWEST  (Pembrokeshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Burke  in 
his  "  General  Armory  "  says,  "  The  Arms  are  generally  said  to  be  an  old  man's 
head  in  profile  couped  at  the  neck.  The  seal  represents  a  castle  triple-towered 
on  a  mount,  from  the  centre  a  man  blowing  a  horn,  on  each  of  the  other  towers 
a  flag,  the  tower  supported  by  two  heraldic  tigers."  Debrett's  "  House  of 
Commons "  gives  an  illustration  which  would  pass  for  the  above,  with  the 
legend,  "  The  Seal  of  Office  of  the  Borough  of  Haverfordwest."  But  an  im- 
pression (perhaps  of  a  different  seal)  which  has  come  under  the  editor's  notice 
represents  a  castle  of  three  towers,  the  centre  one  very  much  the  tallest,  and 
therefrom  a  man  blowing  a  horn  to  the  sinister,  on  each  of  the  outer  towers  a 
flag ;  on  the  dexter  side  of  the  castle  is  an  heraldic  tiger,  and  on  the  sinister 
is  an  eagle  perched  and  regardant,  its  back  towards  the  tower.  At  the  base  is 
a  wyvern  (?).     The  legend  is  "  Sigillum  comune  de  Hawerfordia." 

356 


ccnc 
Dcnc 
c  nn"c 


f 


HARWICH 


HASLINGDEN 


F  U  B  L  t  C 


^;«o^^. 


5. 


HASTINGS 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

HAVRE,  LE  (France).  Gules,  a  salamander  argent,  crowned  and  in  flames  or,  a 
chief  of  France,  i.e.  azure,  three  fleurs-de-lis  or. 

HAWAII.  The  postage  stamps  show  a  coat  quarterly  i  and  4  .  .  two  bars 
argent  2  and  3  argent,  nine  mullets,  three  three  and  three  ...  on  an 
inescocheon  or,  .  .  .   Supporters — Two  natives. 

HAWICK  (Roxburghshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The 
seal  represents  an  escutcheon  charged  with  an  altar  surmounted  by  a  book 
between,  on  the  dexter  side  a  banner  bearing  the  date  I5i4>  and  on  the  sinister 
side  a  heart  regally  crowned,  on  a  chief  sable  a  lamp.  The  legend  is  "  Sigillum 
Burgi  de  Hawick." 

HAYTI.  Azure,  on  a  mount  in  front  of  a  palm-tree  surmounted  by  a  cap  of  liberty, 
a  trophy  of  military  weapons.     [Refer  to  illustration.] 

Christopher,  the  black  Emperor  of  Hayti,  assumed  the  following  arms  :  Or,  a 
phoenix  imperially  crowned  issuing  from  flames  proper.  Motto — "  Je  renais  de 
mes  cendres."  Supporters — Two  lions  rampant  guardant  ermine,  imperially 
crowned  or. 

HEBREW  SCHOOL  (Cambridge).  Refer  to  Cambridge  University,  Regius 
Professors. 

HECKLERS.     Refer  to  Stornoway,  Incorporated  Trades  of 

HEDON  (Yorkshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  a  ship 
upon  waves  of  the  sea.     Legend,  "  Sig.  vil.  de  Hedon  Camera  Regis." 

HELENSBURGH  (Dumbartonshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial 
bearings.  Those  doing  duty  upon  the  seal  are  peculiar  !  !  They  consist  of 
an  achievement  which  the  editor  understands  purports  to  be  that  of  Colquhoun 
of  Luss  impaled  with  Sutherland,  and  consequently  that  of  Sir  James  Grant  or 
Colquhoun  of  Luss,  first  Baronet  (of  the  United  Kingdom),  who  married, 
1 2th  April  1740,  Helen,  daughter  of  William,  Lord  Strathnaver,  and  sister  of 
William,  i6th  Earl  of  Sutherland.  The  arms  are,  on  the  dexter  side  (for 
Colquhoun),  Argent,  a  saltire  engrailed  sable,  and  on  an  inescutcheon  in  chief 
the  badge  of  Ulster  as  a  Baronet  of  the  United  Kingdom.  On  the  sinister  side 
(for  Sutherland),  Gules  three  mullets  or,  on  a  bordure  of  the  last  a  double 
tressure  flory  and  counterflory  of  the  first.  Below  the  shield  hangs  the  badge 
of  a  Baronet  of  Nova  Scotia ! !  !  Perhaps  the  engraver  didn't  know  which 
Sir  James  was,  so  put  in  both  badges  to  make  sure  of  having  the  right  one 
somehow.  For  Crest — A  hart's  head  couped  gules,  attired  argent.  For 
Supporters — On  the  de.xter  side  a  ratch-hound  argent,  collared  sable  (both 
supporters  of  Colquhoun  of  Luss  are  as  this),  and  on  the  sinister  side  a  savage 
wreathed  about  the  head  and  middle  with  leaves  and  holding  over  his  exterior 
shoulder  a  club  all  proper.  Mottoes  (over  the  crest) — "Si  je  puis,"  (under  the 
arms)  "  Cnoc  elachan."  A  baronet's  helmet  and  a  lambrequin  surmount  the 
escutcheon  upon  the  seal. 

358 


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HAYTI 


HELENSBURGH 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
HELLYARS,  COOPERS  AND  (Exeter).     Refer  to  Coopers  and  Hellyars. 

HELSINGFORS  (Finland).  Gules,  an  empty  boat  fessewise  proper,  in  chief  an 
open  crown  or. 

HELSTON  (Cornwall).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  St 
Michael,  his  wings  expanded,  standing  in  a  gateway,  the  two  towers  domed, 
upon  the  upturned  dragon,  impaling  it  with  his  spear,  and  bearing  upon  his 
left  arm  an  escutcheon  of  the  arms  of  England,  namely,  Gules,  three  lions 
passant  guardant  in  pale  or.  The  legend  is  "  Sigillum  comuatis  ville  hellestone 
burgth," 

HENLEY-UPON-THAMES  (Oxfordshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The 
seal  at  present  in  use  represents  the  letter  H  crowned  with  a  five-leaved  ducal 
coronet,  above  which  are  rays  of  the  sun  issuing  from  behind  clouds,  and 
the  Legend  "  Sigillum  Gardiani  ville  de  Henley."  Debrett's  "  House  of 
Commons  "  gives  an  older  seal  showing  a  lion  rampant.  As  to  this  the  following 
extract  from  "Berry"  may  be  some  explanation  : — • 

"  Henley-upon-Thames,  Berkshire  ....  a  lion  rampant,  ....  as  appears 
by  a  seal  pendent  to  a  deed  dated  1306.  The  Corporation-seal,  in  the  year 
1624,  appears  to  be  the  letter  H,  ducally  crowned  ;  in  chief  clouds  issuing 
rain :  with  this  impression  the  money  coined  at  Henley  was  stamped,  as  appears 
by  the  Visitation  of  Berks,  in  which  the  same  is  entered  as  the  seal  of  this 
corporation,  and  with  this  legend  round  it.  Villa;  de  Henley  Sigillum." 

HERALDS'  COLLEGE.     Refer  to  College  of  Arms. 

HEREDITARY  GREAT  MASTER  OF  THE  HOUSEHOLD  IN  SCOT- 
LAND.    Refer  to  Argyll,  Duke  of 

HEREDITARY  LORD  GREAT  SENESCHAL   OF   IRELAND.     Badge  of 
Office,  a  white  wand  in  pale  behind  his  escutcheon. 
[Recorded  in  Ulster's  Office.] 

HEREDITARY  MARSHAL  OF  IRELAND.  Two  batons  in  saltire  behind  his 
arms.  According  to  MS.  Hail.  65S9  f  39,  "  Les  armes  des  office  du  Mareschall 
d'Ireland  sont  de  Goulz  et  cinque  fucelles  bendes  d'Argent." 

HEREFORDSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  old  arms  of  the  city 
of  Hereford  (to  which  refer),  namely,  "  Gules,  three  lions  passant  guardant 
in  pale  argent,"  have  been  quoted  for  the  County. 


360 


HELSINGFORS 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

HEREFORD,  City  of  (Herefordshire).  Gules,  three  lions  passant  guardant  in 
pale  argent,  on  a  bordurc  azure  ten  saltires  of  the  second.  Crest — A  lion 
passant  guardant  argent,  holding  in  the  dexter  paw  a  sword  erect  proper,  hilt 
and  pommel  or.  Supporters — Two  lions  rampant  guardant  argent,  each  gorged 
with  a  collar  azure,  charged  with  three  buckles  or.  Motto — "  Invicta:  fidelitatis 
pr.-Emium." 

The  City  of  Hereford  always,  for  some  reason,  makes  use  of  a  Peer's 
helmet.  The  following  is  a  copy  of  the  original  draft  of  the  grant,  which 
said  draft  is  for  some  reason  in  Ulster's  Office:  — 

"  To  all  &  singular  unto  whom  these  presents  shall  come  S'  Edward  walker 
Kt  Garter  principall  King  of  Armes  of  Inglish  men  sendeth  greeting  whereas 
it  is  most  agreable  to  Justice  &  reason  y'  those  persons  families  &  Citties  that 
have  excell'd  in  wisdome  fidelitie  &  emient  service  to  ther  prince  &  Countrie 
in  y"  times  of  war  should  have  due  regard  for  such  ther  worth  &  valiant  actions 
amoungst  w'''  was  y*^  multitude  of  barbarous  rebells  &  ther  many  &  traitorious 
practises  against  his  majesties  sacred  person  the  religion  lawes  &  liberties  of  his 
majesties  kingdomes  have  excelled  y'^  example  of  former  ages  &  have  therby 
rendered  y'=  duty  Courage  &  loyallty  of  those  who  have  valiantly  &  faithfully 
adhered  to  his  Majestic  y'^  more  perspicuous  &  deserving  esteeme  for  ther  hath 
not  any  Citty  since  this  unnaturall  Rebellion  Exprest  greater  fidelity  & 
Courage  then  y"'  Citty  of  herefford  in  Continuing  there  alleaganc  &  resisting  y'^ 
many  attempts  of  y*^  rebells  but  y*^  greatness  of  there  loyallty  Courages  & 
undaunted  resolution  did  then  most  enimently  appeare  when  being  straightly 
beseiged  for  y*  space  of  5  weeks  by  a  powcrfull  army  of  Rebellious  Scotts  & 
having  noe  hopes  of  releife  they  Joyning  with  garison  &  doeing  y'=  duty  of 
souldiers  then  defended  themselves  and  repelled  ther  fury  and  assaults  with 
such  singular  constansy  &  resolution  &  with  soe  great  distructon  of  y'' 
beseidges  that  they  are  therby  become  y^  wonder  of  ther  Neighboring  garisons 
&  may  be  an  Example  to  all  other  Citties  &  therfore  doe  justly  deserve  such 
caracters  of  honor  as  may  be  certified  to  posterity  know  y'^  therfore  y'  I  y^ 
s"*  S'  Edw.  Walker  K'.  Gar',  princip'.  King  at  (sic)  Armes  of  Inglish  by  y'' 
power  &  authority  anext  to  my  office  of  garter  &  Confirmed  to  me  by  his 
Majesties  letters  pattents  under  y'  great  Seale  of  England  &  likewise  his 
Majesties  speciall  Comand  &  directions  have  devisd  &  sett  forth  such  an 
adition  &  augmentation  of  armes  with  Crest  supporters  &  motto  unto  and 
for  y^  s'^  Citty  viz.  about  y*^  anntient  armes  of  y'  Citty  being  gules  3  lions 
passant  gard. ;  argent  on  a  border  azure  10  saltiers  or  Scottish  Crosses  argent 
supported  by  two  lions  ramp.  gard.  arg.  each  collerd  azure  and  one  each  Coller 
3  buckels  or  in  reference  to  y'^  armes  of  y^  Rebellious  generall  Leisly  Earle  of 
Leuen  by  whom  it  was  besidged  &  for  y"^  Crest  on  a  helme  &  torse  of  y"^ 
Coller  mantled  guls  doubled  argent  a  lion  pass.  gard.  argent  holding  in  y'= 
dexter  paw  a  sword  erect  proper  hilt  &  pomelled  or  &  in  a  scrowle  underneath 
this  Motto  Invictae  fidelitatis  premium  w"''  augmentation  of  armes  Crest 
supporters  &   motto    I    doe  hereby  give  grant  &  assign   unto  y'  now  maior 

362 


HEREFORD 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

aldermen  &  Corporation  of  y^  Citty  of  Hereford  to  be  by  them  &  their  successors 
for  ever  sett  forth  upon  all  occasion  as  y"  proper  armes  of  that  Citty.  In 
wittness  whereof  I  have  herunto  subscribd  my  name  &  affixt  y'^  Scale  of 
my  office  y°  i6  day  of  7"'ber  in  y'^  21  yeare  of  y'=  raign  of  our  souvraigne  1'' 
Charles  by  y"  grace  of  god  king  Ing.  Scott,  fr.  &  Ir.  defender  of  y"=  f"'  &  In  y'^ 
year  of  our  L"*  1645." 

HEREFORD,  See  of.     Gules  three  leopards'  faces  reversed  jessant-de-lis  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

These  arms  are  derived  from  the  personal  arms  of  Thomas  de  Cantelupe, 
Bishop  of  Hereford,  1 275-1 282. 

HEREFORD,  Dean  and  Chapter  of.     Or,  five  chevronels  azure. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms  at  the  Visitation  of  Herefordshire,  1634.] 

HERIOT'S  (GEORGE)  SCHOOL,  or  Heriot's  Hospital  (Edinburgh).  Has  no 
arms.  Those  in  use  are  argent,  a  mullet  azure,  and  in  base  a  child's  head 
crowned,  on  a  chief  gules,  three  roses  argent.  Cres^ — A  cornucopia.  Motto  (over 
crest) — "  I  distribute  cheerfullie." 

[Of  no  authority.  This  school  is  administered  by  the  Governors  of  George 
Heriot's  Trust,  to  which  refer.] 

HERIOT'S  TRUST,  The  Governors  of  George  (Edinburgh).  Have  no  arm.s. 
Those  in  use  are  "argent,  on  a  fesse  azure,  three  cinquefoils  of  the  field,  in 
base  a  mullet  gules."  Crest — A  cornucopia  proper.  Motto — "  I  distribute  cheer- 
fully," or  alternatively,  "  Impendo." 

[George  Heriot,  jeweller  to  King  James,  born  in  Edinburgh,  died  in  London, 
1623.  No  arms  for  him  or  his  family  are  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  but  the 
shield  only  as  above  quoted  is  on  record  at  the  College  of  Arms  in  the  Register 
of  Funeral  Certificates.] 

HERIOT- WATT  COLLEGE.  This  school  is  administered  by  the  Governors  of 
George  Heriot's  Trust,  to  which  refer. 

HERITABLE  USHER  FOR  SCOTLAND.     Refer  to  Walker  Trustees. 


364 


HEREFORD,  DEAN  OF 


HEREFORD,  SEE  OF 


HERIOT'S  SCHOOL 


HERIOTS  TRUST 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

HERTFORDSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  most  generally  employed 
are  "  argent  on  a  mount  vert,  a  hart  lodged  gules,"  but  "  a  hart  trippant  (some- 
times statant)  in  a  ford  "  are  also  in  use. 

HERTFORD,  Town  of  (Hertfordshire.)  Argent,  a  hart  lodged  resting  on  water 
proper. 

Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms. 

Burke's  "General  Armory"  gives  the  arms  with  which  the  town  is  generally 
credited,  namely,  "  Argent  on  a  mount  vert,  a  hart  lodged  gules  "  As  is 
the  case  with  the  county  the  hart  is  sometimes  placed  in  a  ford,  and  trippant  or 
statant.  The  seal,  however,  represents  a  hart  statant  in  a  ford  in  front  of  a  tree, 
and  a  castle  triple-towered  and  domed  in  the  background. 

HERTFORD  COLLEGE  (Oxford).  No  arms.  ^^-^Z— Represented  in  a  land- 
scape a  hart  stooping  down  his  head  as  going  to  drink  at  a  ford,  all  within  a 
ribbon,  on  which  was  the  Motto — "Sicut  cervus  anheiat  ad  fontes  aquarum." 

According  to  the  University  Calendar  the  arms  in  use  are :  "  Gules,  a  stag's 
head  caboshed  argent,  attired  and  between  the  attires  a  cross  pattee  fitchee 
at  the  foot  or,"  but  there  is  no  official  authority  for  this. 

HESSE,  Grand  Duchy  of.  Azure,  a  lion  rampant  double-queued  barry  of  eight 
argent  and  gules,  crowned  or,  holding  in  his  dexter  paw  a  sword  of  the  second, 
hilt  and  pommel  gold.  Supporters — Two  lions  guardant  queue-fourche^  and 
crowned  or.     Motto — "Gott  ehre  vaterland." 


366 


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HESSE 


THE   BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

HESSE-NASSAU,  Province  of  (Prussia).  Per  pale  and  a  point  in  pairle  reversed, 
the  dexter  azure,  a  lion  rampant  barry  of  eight  argent  and  gules,  crowned  or 
(Hesse) ;  azure,  billette  and  a  lion  rampant  and  crowned  or  (Nassau) ;  in  base 
gules,  an  eagle  displayed  argent,  armed  or  (Frankfurt).  Crests — (Dexter)  out 
of  a  crown  two  horns  argent  adorned  with  linden  leaves  (Hesse) ;  (sinister)  out  of 
a  crown  a  lion  sejant  affrontee  crowned  or,  between  two  horns  azure,  billette  or 
(Nassau).  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  savage  supporting  a  banner  of  Prussia ; 
(sinister)  a  man  in  complete  armour  supporting  a  banner  of  Hesse-Nassau 
as  above. 

HEXHAM  (Northumberland).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  County 
Council  of  Northumberland,  iiowever,  exhibits  on  escutcheon  for  Hexham  show- 
ing a  saltire. 

HEYDON.     See  Hedon. 

HEYTESBURY  (Wiltshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  (according  to 
Burke  and  Berry)  shows  the  following  arms  ...  a  long  cross  mounted  on  three 
degrees,  ensigned  on  the  top  with  a  fleur-de-lis,  on  each  side  of  the  cross  an 
escutcheon,  thereon  a  chief  and  two  chevrons.  Berry  adds  a  note,  "  The  colours 
are  not  known." 

HEYWOOD  (Lancashire).  Or,  five  pellets  between  two  bendlets  engrailed,  the 
whole  between  as  many  mascles  sable ;  and  for  the  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours  in  front  of  the  trunk  of  a  tree  eradicated  fessewise,  and  sprouting  to  the 
dexter  a  falcon  rising  proper,  each  wing  charged  with  a  pellet,  and  holding  in 
the  beak  a  sprig  of  oak  also  proper,  three  mascles  interlaced  or.  Motto — ".•\lte 
volo. 

[Granted  by  Sir  Albert  William  Woods,  Garter  Principal  King  of  Arms, 
Robert  Laurie,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms,  Walter  Aston  Blount,  Norroy  King  of 
Arms,  14th  May  1S81.] 

HIGHGATE  SCHOOL  (London).    Argent,  a  sword  fesseways,  point  to  the  dexter 
proper,  pommel  and  hilt  gold,  between  in  chief  an  esquire's  helmet  also  proper, 
and  in  base  a  griffin's  head  erased  sable.     Motto — •"  Altiora  in  votis." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

HIGH  SCHOOL  OF  STIRLING.     Refer  to  Stirling. 

HIGH  WYCOMBE  (Buckinghamshire).     See  Wycombe. 

HIGHAM  FERRERS  (Northamptonshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The 
Corporation  seal,  which  is  very  ancient,  represents  in  chief  a  dexter  hand  couped 
at  the  wrist,  the  little  finger  and  the  next  doubled  in,  the  others  pointing  to  the 
dexter  side,  under  the  hand  nine  men's  heads  in  profile  couped  at  the  neck,  five 
in  the  upper  row,  the  centre  head  looking  to  the  dexter  side,  all  the  other  eight 
looking  to  the  centre  of  the  seal. 

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HEYTESBURY 


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HEYWOOD 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

HILLSBOROUGH  (Co.  Down).     Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in  Ulster's 
Office.     The  seal   represents  a  castle,  and   from  the  dexter  tower  a  banner  of - 
St  George  flying.      This  device  has  been  used  as  a  coat-of-arms.     Motto — 
"  Semper  floreat." 

HINCKLEY,  Honour  of.     Party  per  pale  indented  argent  and  gules. 
[  Vide  Planches  "  Pursuivant  of  Arms,"  p.  6!.] 

HOHEN-EMBS,  County  of.     Azure,  a  steinbock  or,  horned  sable. 

HOHENZOLLERN  LAND,  Province  of  (Prussia).  Quarterly  argent  and 
sable.  Crest — Out  of  a  crown  a  talbot's  head  or,  eared  gules.  Supporters — 
(Dexter)  a  savage  supporting  a  banner  of  Prussia  ;  (sinister)  a  man  in  complete 
armour  supporting  a  banner  of  Hohenzollern. 

HOKKAIDO,  See  of  (Japan).     Per  fesse  the  chief  azure,  and  thereon  the  sun  rays 
extended  throughout  or,  rising  from  waves  of  the  sea,  therein  a  fish  naiant  all 
proper,  the  base  argent,  a  cross  gules. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

HOLBORN,  Borough  of  (London).  Argent,  a  cro.ss  gules,  charged  in  the  centre 
point  with  a  hind  lodged,  pierced  by  an  arrow  or,  on  a  chief  sable,  three  escallops 
of  the  field.  Crest — Out  of  a  mural  crown  proper,  a  demi-figure  representing 
St  Andrew  the  Apostle,  vested  azure,  holding  in  the  dexter  hand  an  open  book 
also  proper,  and  supporting  on  his  sinister  arm  a  saltire  argent.  Supporters — • 
(Dexter)  a  lion,  (sinister)  a  gryphon,  both  or,  each  gorged  with  a  collar  gules, 
suspended  therefrom  an  escocheon  barry  wavy  of  ten  argent  and  azure.  Motto 
— "Multi  per  transibunt  et  augebitur  scientia." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  May  13,  1906.] 

HOLLAND.     Refer  to  Netherlands. 

HOLSTEIN.     Refer  to  Denmark. 

HOLY  SPIRIT,  College  of  the  (Isle  of  Cumbrae,  N.B.).  Quarterly,  ist  and  4th 
grand  quarters,  azure,  St  Columba  in  a  boat  at  sea,  on  his  sinister  hand  a  dove, 
and  in  dexter  chief  a  blazing  star  all  proper  ;  2nd  and  3rd  grand  quarters,  counter- 
quartered,  1st  and  4th  or,  an  eagle  displayed  with  two  heads  gules,  armed  and 
beaked  azure,  2nd  and  3rd,  parted  per  bend  embattled  gules  and  argent ;  in  an 
escutcheon  of  pretence  in  the  centre  of  the  2nd  and  3rd  grand  quarters  or,  three 
stags'  horns  gules. 

[Recorded   in  Lyon    Office.     Granted  by  George  Burnett,  Lyon   King  of 
Arms,  30th  November  1874.] 

HOLYWOOD  (Co.  Dowrn).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  Town 
Commissioners  represents  the  gable  end  of  a  church,  surrounded  by  a  wood. 


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HOLBORN 


HOLY  SPIRIT,  COLLEGE  OF  THE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

HONAN,  See  of  (China).     Argent,  a  cross  purpure,  in  the  first  quarter  a  flaming 
lamp,  in  the  second  an  irradiated  book  expanded,  in  the  third  a  (?),  in  the  fourth 
a  sprig  of  three  maple  leaves. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

HONDURAS.     Refer  to  British  Honduras. 

HONDURAS  AND  CENTRAL  AMERICA,  See  of.     Argent,  on  a  cross  gules 
between  four  leaves  an  open  book  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

HONG-KONG.  No  ofificial  warrant  assigning  arms  has  as  yet  been  issued  to  Hong- 
Kong.     The  device  published  by  the  Admiralty  is  a  landscape. 

HONG-KONG  UNIVERSITY.     Refer  to  University  of  Hong-Kong. 

HONITON  (Devonshire).  Has  not  any  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents 
on  the  dexter  side  a  branch  of  honeysuckle  below  a  human  figure,  affrontee 
erased  at  the  waist,  holding  its  dexter  hand  towards  a  female  three-quarter 
length  figure  in  profile  vested.  In  chief  is  a  dexter  hand  fesseways,  couped  at 
the  wrist,  the  third  and  fourth  fingers  doubled  down.  The  legend  is  "  The 
Common  Seal  of  the  Borough  of  Honiton,  Devon,  1846." 

An  interesting  article  by  J.  Gale  Pedrick  in  relation  to  the  charges  upon 
the  seal  appears  in  the  Genealogical  Magazine,  vol.  ii.  pp.  18-22. 

HONOLULU,  See  of.       Per  fesse  gules  and   azure,  in  chief  two  keys  in  satire 
addorsed  argent,  in  base  a  cross  moline  of  the  same. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

HONOURABLE  ARTILLERY  COMPANY.     Refer  to  Artillery  Company. 

HONOURABLE  EAST  INDIA  COMPANY.     Refer  to  East  India  Company. 

HONOURABLE  SOCIETIES  OF  LINCOLN'S  INN,  INNER  TEMPLE, 
MIDDLE  TEMPLE,  AND  GRAY'S  INN.     Refer  to  those  several  names. 

[There  is  really  no  authority  for  this  style  of  Honourable,  which  is  self  given. 
As  a  mere  adjective  one  hopes  it  is  deserved,  though  the  lay  person  has  often 
questioned  it,  but  as  a  formal  style  one  would  have  looked  to  find  some 
official  sanction  from  the  quarter  from  which  rank,  dignities,  and  styles  are 
usually  derived.] 


372 


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HONDURAS  AND  CENTRAL  AMERICA,  SEE  OF 


HONOLULU,  SEE  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

HORNERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).     (Incorporated  12th  January 
1638.)     Argent,  on    a  chevron   between    three  leather  bottles  sable,  as  many 
bugle  horns  stringed  of  the  first. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

HORNSEY,  Borough  of  (London).     Per  chevron  argent  and  sable,  in  chief  two 
trees  eradicated  proper,  and  in  base  two  swords  in  saltire  of  the  first,  pommels 
and  hilts  or.     Motto — "  Fortitor  quo  paratior." 
[Grants,  74,  99,  College  of  Arms.] 

HORSHAM  (Sussex).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  following  are  given  in 
Burke's  "General  Armory": — "  Az.  a  lion  ramp,  ar.,  resting  the  dexter  hind- 
foot  on  the  letter  H." 

HOSPITAL.  Refer  to  Bethlehem  Hospital,  Charterhouse  (Sutton's  Hospital), 
Christ's  Hospital,  Foundling  Hospital,  Guy's  Hospital,  Morden  Hospital,  St 
Bartholomew's  Hospital,  St  Cross  Hospital,  St  George's  Hospital,  St  John  of 
Jerusalem  Hospital,  St  Katherine's  Hospital,  St  Thomas  of  Aeon's  Hospital. 

HOVE,  Borough  of  (Sussex).  Per  chevron  the  chief  per  pale  or  and  gules,  on  the 
dexter  a  saltire  azure,  surmounted  by  another  argent,  and  on  the  sinister  two 
pairs  of  leg-irons,  one  chevronwise,  the  other  reversed  and  interlaced  of  the  first ; 
the  base  chequy  azure  and  or,  three  martlets,  one  and  two  of  the  last,  all  within 
a  bordure  ermine  charged  with  six  martlets,  also  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of 
the  colours,  upon  a  mount  of  shingle,  an  ancient  ship  proper,  with  the  sail  dis- 
played azure,  semee  of  cross  crosslets  or,  and  on  a  banner  gules  flying  from  the 
masthead  to  the  dexter,  a  martlet  as  in  the  arms.  Motto — "  Floreat  Hova." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  i6th  December  1899.] 


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HORNSEY,  BOROUGH  OF 


r..  1  b  ^' 


HORSHAM 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

HUDDERSFIELD  (Yorkshire).  Or,  on  a  chevron  between  three  rams  passant 
sable,  as  many  towers  argent.  Crest — A  ram's  head  couped  argent,  armed  or, 
gorged  with  a  collar  sable,  holding  in  the  mouth  a  sprig  of  the  cotton-tree, 
slipped  and  fructed  proper.     Motto — "  Juvat  impigros  Deus." 

Granted  by  Sir  Charles  George  Young,  Knt,  Garter  Principal  King  of 
Arms,  Robert  Laurie,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms,  William  Aston  Blount,  Norroy 
King  of  Arms,  October  12,  1868. 

The  rams  upon  the  escutcheon  and  the  ram's  head  in  the  crest  are,  of 
course,  an  allusion  to  the  fact  that  the  freehold  of  the  town  of  Huddersfield  has 
almost  exclusively  belonged  to  the  Ramsden  family.  The  legend  runs  that  at 
one  time  a  former  Sir  John  Ramsden  was  the  possessor  of  the  whole  of  the 
town,  with  the  exception  of  a  small  house  and  smithy  belonging  to  a  labouring 
blacksmith  of  Quaker  persuasion.  Wishing  to  purchase  this  land,  and  thus 
possess  the  whole  of  the  town,  the  Baronet  called  on  the  Quaker  and  asked  if 
the  latter  were  willing  to  sell.  The  blacksmith  asked  what  price  was  offered. 
"  I  will  cover  this  kitchen  floor  with  sovereigns,"  answered  the  Baronet.  "  Wilt 
thee  lay  them  edge  upwards?"  "No,  I  will  cover  your  floor  with  them,  but  I 
will  lay  them  flat."  This  was  refused,  the  Quaker  ending  the  conversation  by 
saying,  "Ah,  well  then,  Sir  John,  Huddersfield  belongs  to  thee  and  to  me." 

It  always  seems  to  me  a  pity  to  discredit  a  good  tale,  but  the  occasion 
sometimes  arises.  In  order  to  obtain  an  authentic  confirmation  or  denial  of  the 
story,  the  present  Sir  John  Ramsden,  Baronet,  was  written  to,  and  the  letter 
brought  the  following  reply  : — 

"As  regards  the  subject  of  your  letter,  I  am  directed  to  say  that  Sir  John 
is  sorry  he  can  give  no  information  as  to  the  legend,  often  repeated  with 
variations,  and  often  appearing  in  print ;  but  Sir  John  never  heard  it  from  any 
member  of  his  own  family,  even  as  a  tradition,  and  an  old  Quaker  gentleman, 
the  descendant  and  heir  of  the  Quaker  who  figures  in  the  story,  and  from  whom 
Sir  John  himself  bought  the  land  in  question  many  years  ago,  assured  him 
there  was  no  truth  in  it  whatever." 

HUDSON'S  BAY  COMPANY.     (Incorporated  21  Charles  II.,  1670.)     Argent,  a 
cross  gules,  between  four  beavers  passant  proper.     Crest — On  a  chapeau  gules 
turned    up    ermine    squirrel    sejant    proper. — Supporters — Two    bucks    proper. 
Motto — "  Pro  pelle  cutem." 
[Of  no  authority.] 


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HULL,  or  more  properly  KINGSTON-UPON-HULL  (Yorkshire).  Azure, 
three  ducal  coronets  in  pale  or. 

Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms. 

The  origin  of  the  coronets  is  said  to  be  due  to  a  company  of  "  Merchant 
Adventurers,"  who,  likening  themselves  to  the  three  merchant  kings  of  the  East, 
who  presented  themselves  with  offerings  at  Bethlehem  of  old,  assumed  their 
three  crowns  as  a  device  for  the  seal  of  the  company,  and  this  design  being 
subsequently  adopted  by  the  town.  My  only  authority  for  the  foregoing 
tradition  is  a  newspaper  cutting. 

A  more  likely  origin  may  be  found  in  the  arms  of  the  City  of  Cologne,  and 
the  habit  of  those  who  imported  fine  linen  from  that  city  to  set  up  the  arms 
thereof  as  indicative  of  the  wares  they  dealt  in. 

HULL,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

HUNGARY.     Refer  to  Austria. 

HUNGARY,  Kingdom  of.  Quarterly:  i,  barry  of  eight  argent  and  gules  for 
Hungary,  impaling  azure  a  patriarchal  cross  argent,  issuing  from  a  ducal  coronet 
or,  placed  on  a  mount  of  three  ascents  vert,  also  for  Hungary ;  2,  azure  three 
leopards'  heads  crowned  or,  for  Dalmatia ;  3,  chequy  argent  and  gules  for 
Croatia ;  4,  or,  a  dexter  arm  embowed  proper,  habited  gules,  issuing  from  the 
sinister  side,  and  holding  in  the  hand  a  cutlass  argent,  hilt  and  pommel  or,  for 
Sclavonia.     Supporters — Two  angels  supporting  the  crown  of  St  Stephen. 

HUNTINGDONSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  County 
Council  adopts  a  design  identical  with  that  upon  the  seal  of  the  Corporation  of 
the  town  of  Huntingdon  (to  which  refer),  substituting  for  its  legend  "  Hunting- 
donshire County  Council,  1889." 

HUNTINGDON,  Town  of  (Huntingdonshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The 
seal  represents  a  landscape,  in  the  centre  of  which  is  a  tree,  on  the  dexter  side 
of  which  is  a  bird  perched,  on  the  sinister  side  of  the  tree  is  a  huntsman 
(supposed  to  represent  Robin  Hood)  blowing  a  horn,  in  his  sinister  hand  a  bow 
and  arrow,  on  the  dexter  side  a  stag  courant  pursued  by  two  dogs,  all  proper. 
The  legend  is  "Sigillum  communitatis  de  Huntirisoune,  1628." 

HUNTLY  (Aberdeenshire).  Has  no  arms.  The  seal,  which  is  not  heraldic,  shows 
a  representation  of  the  old  castle  of  Huntly.     Motto — "  Wile  dulci." 

HURON,  See  of  (Canada).     Gules,  two  swords  in  saltire  argent,  hilted  or,  in  chief 
an  Imperial  crown  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

HURRERS  AND  MILLENERS'  COMPANY.  An  ancient  name  for  the 
Haberdashers'  Company,  to  which  refer. 

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THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

HYDE  (Cheshire).  Azure,  a  chevron  nebuly  argent,  between  three  lozenges  or,  on 
a  chief  of  the  second  a  flake  erect  surmounted  by  a  hatter's  bow  in  bend  sinister 
between  a  cog-wheel  and  two  miners'  picks  in  saltire,  therefrom  suspended  a 
Davy  lamp  all  proper ;  and  for  the  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  upon  a 
pack  of  cotton  prints  azure,  banded  and  semee  of  mascles  or,  a  sprig  of  the 
cotton-tree  slipped  and  fructed  in  bend  sinister,  surmounted  by  a  shuttle 
furnished  in  bend  proper.  Motto — "  Onward." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  i8th  July  1882.] 

HYTHE  (Kent).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  upon  the  sea  a 
one-masted  ship,  thereon  two  men,  the  sail  furled,  and  two  men  lying  on  the 
yard-arm.  In  the  sea  are  fish  swimming.  The  legend  is  "  Sigillum  commune 
baronum  de  Hethe." 

ICELAND.     Refer  to  Denmark. 

ILCHESTER  (Somerset).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  following  are  quoted 
in  Burke's  "General  Armory,"  though  with  no  colours  mentioned: — "In  a 
crescent  an  estoile  of  sixteen  points." 

ILKESTON  (Derbyshirej.  Argent,  on  a  saltire  sable  between  two  cotton  hanks 
in  pale  and  as  many  sinister  gloves  in  fesse  proper,  the  astronomical  sign  of 
Mars  or,  on  a  chief  azure  a  representation  of  a  piece  of  Maltese  lace  fessewise 
argent ;  and  for  the  Crest — Upon  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  bear's  head  couped 
proper,  charged  on  the  neck  with  the  astronomical  sign  of  Mars  sable,  suspended 
from  the  mouth  a  safety-lamp  proper.  Motto — "  Labor  omnia  vincit." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  24th  August  1887.] 

ILLYRIA.     Refer  to  Austria. 

IMPERIAL  COLLEGE  OF  SCIENCE  AND  TECHNOLOGY  (London). 
Per  fesse  in  chief  the  Royal  Arms  of  the  United  Kingdom  of  Great  Britain  and 
Ireland,  in  base  or,  an  open  book  proper  inscribed  with  the  word  "  Scientia." 
Motto — "  Scientia  imperii  decus  et  tutamen." 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant  of  King  Edward  VII.,  and  recorded  in  the 
College  of  Arms.] 

INCORPORATED  ACCOUNTANTS  AND  AUDITORS,  Society  of.  Have  no 
arms.  The  device  in  use  is  a  female  figure  vested,  crowned  with  a  mural  crown, 
holding  in  her  dexter  hand  a  scroll  inscribed  "  Diligentia  et  vigilantia,"  and 
in  her  sinister  hand  a  key,  and  standing  on  the  upper  part  of  a  terrestrial  globe 
issuing  amongst  clouds. 

INCORPORATED  LAW  SOCIETY  (of  England).  Refer  to  Attorneys, 
Solicitors,  Proctors. 


380 


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IMPERIAL  COLLEGE  OF  SCIENCE  AND 
TECHNOLOGY 


THE  BOOK  OF 'PUBLIC  ARMS 

INCORPORATED    LAW    SOCIETY    OF    IRELAND.     Azure,    a    harp    or,, 
stringed  argent,  on  a  chief  ermine,  a  pale  gules,  charged  with  an   Imperial 
crown  proper.     Mantling — Gules,  doubled  argent.     Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  a  Figure  of  Justice   proper.     Supporters — Two    Irish  wolf-hounds  or. 
Motto—"  Veritas  vincet." 

[Granted  by  Ulster  King  of  Arms,  7th  June  191 2.] 

INCORPORATED  TRADES.  Refer  to  Aberdeen  and  S.tornoway,  and  for  the 
Trade  Companies  of  Chester,  Durham,  Edinburgh,  Exeter,  and  London,  refer 
to  the  several  trades. 

INDIA.  Strange  as  it  may  appear,  no  arms  have  ever  been  assigned  by  warrant  or 
otherwise  to  the  Empire  of  India  as  a  whole,  or  to  any  of  the  subdivisions.  At 
the  coronation  of  King  George  V.  a  banner,  "  argent,  on  a  cross  gules  the  Star 
of  India,  surmounted  by  a  Royal  Crown,"  was  carried  for  India,  but  this  was 
neither  granted  nor  assigned  but  merely  "approved"  by  His  Majesty.  The 
Viceroy  of  India  in  India  uses  the  Union  Jack  charged  with  the  device  of  the 
Star  of  India  and  Crown  as  above  described. 

INDIA,  or  THE  INDIES.     Azure,  a  lion  rampant  argent,  holding  a  cross  or. 

[These  arms  were  borne  for  India  by  the  Empress  Maria  Theresa,  Queen 
of  Hungary.] 

INDIES,  The.  Refer  to  Scotland,  Company  of,  trading  to  Africa  and  the  Indies, 
and  refer  to  East  India  and  West  Indies. 

INNERLEITHEN  (Peebles).  Has  no  arms.  Those  upon  the  seal  are  :  Quarterly, 
per  fesse  embattled  gules,  or,  argent,  and  azure,  over  all  a  representation  of  the 
legend  in  which  St  Ronan  is  reputed  to  have  "cleekit  the  deil  by  the  hint  hoof" 
with  his  episcopal  crook.  Crest — St  Ronan  in  a  boat  bearing  his  crosier  and  a 
lantern,  and  on  an  escrol  above  "St  Ronan."  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  fox, 
(sinister)  a  hare,  each  bearing  a  banner,  the  two  banners  bearing  the  words, 
"  Live  and  let  live."  Motto — "  Watch  and  pray." 
[Quite  bogus.] 

INNER  TEMPLE  (London).     Azure,  a  pegasus  saliant  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

INNHOLDERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  21st 
December  15 14.)  Azure,  a  chevron  per  pale  and  per  chevron  gules  and  argent, 
counterchanged,  between  three  garbs  or,  on  a  chief  argent,  two  batons  crossed 
at  each  end  sable  in  saltire,  the  dexter  surmounted  by  the  sinister,  commonly 
called  St  Julian's  cross.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  an  estoile  of  sixteen 
points  or  issuing  from  clouds  in  base  proper.  Supporters — Two  horses  re- 
gardant argent.  Motto — "  Hinc  spes  affulget "  (ancient  motto,  "Come  ye 
blessed  !  when  I  was  harbourless,  ye  lodged  Me  "). 
[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.] 

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INNHOLDERS,  COMPANY  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

INNS  OF  COURT  AND  CHANCERY.  Refer  to  Barnards,  Chester  or  Strand, 
Clement's,  Clifford's,  Cursitor's,  Furnival's,  Gray's,  Kidderminster  or  Six  Clerks' 
Office,  Lincoln's,  Lion's,  New  or  Our  Lady's,  Serjeant's,  Stafford's,  Staple's, 
Inner  Temple,  Middle  Temple,  Thavies. 

Of  the  foregoing  only  Lincoln's  Inn,  Gray's  Inn,  and  the  Inner  and  Middle 
Temples  remain  in  existence. 

INSTITUTE  OF  CHARTERED  ACCOUNTANTS.     Refer  to  Accountants. 

INSTITUTION.     Refer  to  Royal  Institution. 

INSTITUTION  OF  CIVIL  ENGINEERS.     Refer  to  Engineers. 

INVERARAY  (Argyllshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The 
seal  represents  an  escutcheon  charged  with  five  fishes  in  divers  and  most 
miscellaneous  positions.  The  motto  upon  the  seal  is,  "  Semper  tibi  pendeat 
halec." 

To  have  blazoned  the  arms  as  shown  upon  the  escutcheon  appearing  on 
the  seal  correctly  would  have  appeared  almost  impossible,  but  the  attempt  has 
'been  made  by  some  one,  with  the  following  most  remarkable  result: — "The 
field  of  the  coat,  the  sea  proper,  a  net  argent  suspended  from  the  dexter  chief 
point  and  the  sinister  fesse  points  to  the  base,  in  chief  two  and  in  base  three 
herrings  entangled  in  the  net. 

INVERBERVIE.     See  Bervie. 

INVERGORDON  (Ross  and  Cromarty).  Has  no  arms,  and  its  seal,  which  is  not 
heraldic,  shows  a  seated  figure  of  Neptune. 

INVERKEITHING  (Fifeshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings. 
It  has  several  seals,  but  the  one  which  seems  to  do  duty  represents  upon  waves 
of  the  sea  an  ancient  one-masted  vessel,  the  sail  furled,  and  within  the  legend, 
"  S'  commune  Burgi  de  Invirkethyn." 

4 

INVERNESS-SHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  County 
Council  displays  upon  a  trefoil  a  stag's  head  and  a  bull's  head,  both  erased,  and 
a  lymphad.  Motto — "  Air  son  math  na  siorrachd."  Legend — "  Seal  of  the 
County  Council  of  Inverness-shire." 

INVERNESS,  Borough  of  (Inverness-shire).  Gules,  our  Lord  upon  the  cross 
proper.  Mantling — Gules,  doubled  or.  Crest. — Upon  a  wreath  of  the  proper 
liveries,  a  cornucopia  proper  and  in  an  escroll  over  the  same  this  Motto — 
"  Concordia  et  fidelitas."  Sxtpporters — (Dexter)  a  dromedary,  (sinister)  an 
elephant,  both  proper. 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  gth  February  1900.] 


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THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

INVERURIE  (Aberdeenshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings. 
In  reply  to  an  inquiry  upon  the  matter  the  editor  received  the  following  letter  : — 
"  I  was  favoured  with  your  letter  as  to  the  Armorial  Bearings  of  the  Burgh 
of  Inverurie.  I  have  to  explain  that  the  Arms  of  the  Burgh  were  never 
matriculated,  and  that  my  Town  Council  do  not  think  it  advisable  to  have  them 
published  as  if  they  were."  [H'm,  would  they  have  been? — Ed.]  They  are, 
"  Or,  on  a  saltire  gules,  a  crown,  on  a  chief  azure,  two  towers  argent."  Motto — 
"  Urbs  in  rure." 

IPSWICH,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

IPSWICH  (Suffolk).  Party  per  pale  gules  and  azure,  on  the  dexter  side,  a  lion 
rampant  guardant  or,  and  on  the  sinister  three  demi-hulks  of  ships  of  the  same 
conjoined  to  the  impalement  line.  Crest— A  demi-lion  rampant  or,  holding  in 
the  paws  a  ship  of  three  masts,  the  sails  all  furled  proper.  Supporters — On 
either  side  a  sea-horse  proper,  finned  and  maned  or. 

[Arms   confirmed    and    crest   and    supporters  granted    by   Wm.    Harvey, 
Clarenceux,  29th  August  1561.     Grant  printed  "  Misc.  Gen.  et  Her.,"  Qs.  ii.  343.] 


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IRELAND.  Azure,  a  harp  or,  stringed  argent.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours 
(or  and  azure)  a  tower  triple-towered  or,  from  the  portal  a  hart  springing  argent, 
attired  and  unguled,  also  or.     (Refer  to  Great  Britain  and  Ireland.) 

At  the  present  time  the  crest  is  universally  quoted  with  the  hart  "spring- 
ing," and  it  was  so  blazoned  in  the  Royal  Warrant  of  King  George  III.  The 
earliest  record  in  the  College  of  Arms,  however,  distinctly  shows  the  hart 
"  lodged,"  and  it  is  interesting  to  trace  through  the  different  drawings  how, 
through  "  indifferent  drawing,"  the  position  of  the  animal  has  been  altered.  The 
following  is  taken  intact  from  Burke's  "  General  Armory  "  : — 

"  Ireland,  Kingdom  of — Az.  a  harp  or,  stringed  ar.  The  ancient  arms  of 
the  kingdom  after  the  invasion  of  1 172  were,  '  Az.  three  crowns  or.'  [These  are 
now  the  arms  of  the  Province  of  Munster. — Ed.]  This  was  the  coat  of  St 
Edmund,  and  it  is  possible  the  Anglo-Norman  invaders,  who  were  arrayed 
under  the  banners  of  St  George  and  St  Edmund,  introduced  the  bearings  of  the 
latter  saint  as  the  ensigns  of  their  new  conquest.  When  Richard  II.  created 
Robert  de  Vere,  Earl  of  Oxford,  Duke  of  Ireland,  he  gave  him  as  a  coat  of 
augmentation  the  arms  of  Ireland,  viz.,  '  Az.  three  crowns  or.'  Henry  VIII. 
relinquished  the  old  arms  for  the  '  harp '  when  he  declared  himself  King  01 
Ireland,  from  an  apprehension,  it  is  said,  that  the  three  crowns  might  be  taken 
for  the  triple  tiara  of  the  Pope.  Since  James  I.  introduced  the  arms  of  Ireland 
among  the  quarterings  of  the  Royal  achievement,  the  bearing  has  been  '  Az.  a 
harp  or,  stringed  an'  From  a  MS.  in  the  handwriting  of  Sir  William  Le  Neve, 
Clarenceux,  it  appears,  on  the  authority  of  Sir  William  Segar,  Garter,  that 
'Ye  three  crowns  are  ye  antientarms  of  Ireland,  the  harp  but  an  ancient  badge,' 
and  'In  ye  tyme  of  Edward  ye  IVth  a  commission  being  to  enquire  the  arms 
of  Ireland,  it  was  returned  yt  ye  3  crownes  were  the  armes.'  The  same  bearing 
appears  on  the  reverse  of  ancient  Irish  coins.  Another  ancient  coat,  as  recorded 
in  Ulster's  Office,  is,  Sa.  a  king  sitting  on  his  throne  cross-legged,  holding  in  his 
right  hand  a  lily  or.  Crest — A  tower  triple-towered  or,  from  the  portal  a  hart 
springing  ar.  attired  and  hoofed  gold.  The  badge,  as  settled  at  the  Union  with 
Great  Britain,  is  the  harp  ensigned  with  the  Imperial  crown.  A  MS.  in  the 
British  Museum,  Add.  MSS.  4814,  f.  8,  exhibits  a  banner  on  either  side  of  the 
shield,  viz.,  dexter,  sa.  a  king  enthroned  in  his  chair  of  state  with  a  sceptre  in  his 
right  hand  and  his  left  leaning  on  a  cushion  all  ar. ;  sinister,  gu.  a  house  triple- 
chimneyed,  smoke  issuant  or,  a  stag  in  the  port  of  the  first,  and  a  tree  on  the 
dexter  side  of  the  second." 

For  the  following  two  paragraphs  I  am  indebted  to  a  small  pamphlet  pub- 
lished by  Mr  John  Vinycomb: — 

"  At  the  accession  of  King  James  I.  to  the  English  throne,  when  the  change 
in  the  Royal  Arms  was  made,  Sir  William  Segar  relates  that  the  Earl  of 
Northampton,  then  Deputy  Earl  Marshal,  observed  that  '  he  had  no  affection 
for  the  change  ;  that  for  the  adoption  of  the  harp  the  best  reason  he  could  assign 
was  that  it  resembled  Ireland  in  being  such  an  instrument  that  it  required  more 
cost  to  keep  it  in  tune  than  it  was  worth.' 

"Sir  Arthur  Chichester  was  re-appointed  to  the  government  of  Ireland  as 

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THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

Lord  Deputy,  July  1613  ;  it  is  stated  that  it  was  at  his  instigation  the  Harp  of 
Ireland  was  first  marshalled  with  the  arms  of  the  sister  kingdoms  upon  the  Irish 
currency,  and  in  one  form  or  another  it  has  ever  since  continued  to  be  impressed 
upon  the  coin  of  the  realm.  Some  of  the  copper  coins  of  Henry  VIII.  and  Queen 
Elizabeth  have,  it  is  said,  the  three  harps  for  Ireland  upon  the  shield,  as  if  un- 
determined whether  to  follow  the  triple  or  single  representation  of  the  device. 
A  curious  old  seal  of  the  port  of  Carrickfergus,  dated  1605,  has  upon  the  shield 
three  harps  of  the  Brian  Boru  type." 

A  great  deal  of  fuss  has  been  made  lately  about  "  the  uncrowned  harp  "  of 
Irish  notoriety,  which  is  credited  with  some  subtle  connection  with  the  "  un- 
crowned king,"  or  at  any  rate  with  that  suppositious  and  clamoured-for  state  ol 
things  in  Ireland  which  is  the  "odds"  of  His  Majesty  and  his  executive.  The 
ordinary  harp  of  Ireland,  as  a  moment's  glance  at  a  florin  or  half-crown  will 
show,  is  not  crowned  ;  the  crown  being  simply  added  when  the  harp  does  duty 
off  the  shield  as  a  "badge,"  as  is  or  should  be  the  case  with  all  the  national 
badges,  save  in  the  case  of  the  dragon  of  Wales — Wales  being  only  a  Princi- 
pality. The  mistake  probably  occurs  because  the  harp  does  duty  both  as  a 
charge  upon  the  escutcheon  and  as  a  badge.  The  "  uncrowned  harp  upon  a 
green  flag "  (which  seems  to  have  been  made  the  subject  of  diplomatic  (.■') 
inquiries  in  the  House  of  Commons,  in  other  words,  "  Vert,  an  Irish 
harp  or,  stringed  argent,"  is  simply  the  perfectly  legitimate,  authentic,  and 
well-known  coat-of-arms  of  the  Province  of  Leinster.  So  that  the  so-called 
Irish  Republican  party  must  invent  a  design  very  original  and  different  if  they 
want  anything  distinctive  from  the  authorised  emblems.  Even  the  shamrock 
(under  the  name  of  the  trefoil)  is  ranked  among  the  "  legitimist"  and  legitimate 
signs.  Might  I  suggest  as  something  widely  distinct  from  the  Irish  regulation 
symbols,  and  yet  appropriate,  the  following :  Sable,  two  bones  in  saltire,  sur- 
mounted by  a  morthead  argent  .■" 

IRELAND.  Refer  to  Lord-Lieutenant,  Hereditary  Lord  Great  Seneschal  and 
Hereditary  Marshal,  Commissioners  of  Revenue,  and  Farmers  of  Excise;  also 
"  Office  of  Jests,  Revells  and  Masques " ;  also  Surgeons,  and  to  Physicians ; 
also  Universities  and  Incorporated  Law  Society. 

IRELAND,  Royal  University  of.     Refer  to  University  of  Ireland. 

IRELAND,  National  University  of.     Refer  to  University  of  Ireland. 

IRISH  ACADEMY,  Royal,     Refer  to  Academy. 

IRON  AND  STEEL  INSTITUTE  (London).  Sable,  a  buck's  head  caboshed 
and  in  chief  two  hawks'  bells  argent,  on  a  chief  rayonne  or,  the  astronomical 
symbol  of  Mars  of  the  first.  Crest — A  miner's  pick  and  gad  in  saltire  sable. 
Motto — "  Faber  fabrum  adjuvet." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  March  3,  1908.] 

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IRONMONGERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  20th 
March  1463.)  Argent,  on  a  chevron  gules  between  three  steel  gads  azure,  three 
swivels  or  (the  centre  one  palewise,  the  others  chevronwise).  Crest — On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  two  scaly  lizards  erect  on  their  hind  feet  combatant  proper 
{i.e.  vert),  each  gorged  with  a  plain  collar  or,  the  collars  chained  together,  a  chain 
with  a  ring  at  the  end  pendant  between  the  two  lizards  of  the  last.  Supporters — 
Two  lizards  proper  as  in  the  crest.  Motto — "  God  is  our  strength  "  (anciently 
"  Assher  Dure  "). 

[Granted  1st  September  1455  (Grant  printed  "Herald  and  Genealogist," 
i.  39);  confirmed  1530.  Arms  and  crest  regranted  with  supporters  by  William 
Hervey,  Clarenceux,  28th  May  1560,  and  Hervey's  grant  confirmed,  approved, 
and  entered  by  Henry  St  George  at  the  Visitation  of  London,  1634.] 

IRVINE  (Ayrshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  at 
present  in  use,  which  is  of  exquisite  workmanship,  appears  to  be  an  amalgamation 
of  the  designs  upon  three  older  seals,  and  represents  as  resting  upon  a  mount  an 
escutcheon  charged  with  the  Royal  Crest  of  Scotland.  Upon  the  dexter  side  of 
the  escutcheon  seated  under  a  canopy  is  the  Holy  Virgin  and  Child,  and  on  the 
sinister  side  a  lion  sejant  guardant  erect,  royally  crowned  and  holding  between 
its  forepaws  a  tree  eradicated  proper  ;  and  upon  an  escroll  above  the  escutcheon 
the  Motto,  "  Tandem  bona  causa  triumphat."  The  Legend  is  "  Sigillo  commune 
Burgi  de  Irvine." 

ISLANDS,  CHANNEL.     See  Channel  Islands. 

ISLE  OF  MAN.  Gules,  three  legs  in  armour  flexed  at  the  knee  and  conjoined  at 
the  thigh,  all  proper,  garnished  and  spurred  or.  Recorded  in  the  College  of 
Arms.  In  a  collection  of  crests  by  Le  Neve  a  crest  is  assigned  to  this  coat, 
namely,  two  arms  embowed  in  armour  argent,  holding  in  the  hands  a  gem-ring 
or,  stoned  sable,  but  this  is  hardly  of  authority,  and  I  believe  is  never  made  use 
of  Motto — "  Stabit  quocunque  jeceris."  The  Isle  of  Man  "  Kneels  to  England, 
kicks  at  Scotland,  and  spurns  Ireland." 

ISLE  OF  WIGHT.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

ISLES,  See  of  the  (Scotland).  Azure,  the  figure  of  St  Columba  in  a  boat  at  sea, 
on  his  sinister  hand  a  dove,  in  dexter  chief  a  blazing  star  all  proper. 

[These  arms  were  never  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register  as  the  arms  of  the 
Episcopal  see,  but  in  allusion  thereto  they  were  matriculated  in  1874  in  the  first 
and  fourth  quarters  of  the  arms  of  the  College  of  the  Holy  Spirit  at  Cumbrae.] 

ISLES.     Refer  to  Argyll  and  the  Isles  Bishop  of 


392 


IRONMONGERS,   COMPANY  OF 


ISLE  OF  MAN 


ISLES,  SEE  OF  THE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ISLINGTON,  Borough  of  (London).  Per  fesse  gules  and  argent,  a  cross  counter- 
changed  between  a  cross  potent  or  in  the  first  quarter,  a  Hon  rampant  argent  in 
the  second  quarter,  an  eagle  displayed  in  the  third,  and  a  water-bouget  in  the 
fourth,  both  sable.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  in  front  of  a  water- 
bouget  sable,  a  long  bow  stringed  fessewise  and  an  arrow  erect  proper.  Motto — 
"  Deus  per  omnia." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  2nd  May  1901.] 

ISLINGTON,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

ISTRIA.     Azure,  a  goat  passant  or,  armed  gules. 

ITALY,  Kingdom  of.  Gules,  a  cross  argent.  Supporters — Two  lions  rampant 
regardant  proper.  Pavilion — Gules,  lined  ermine,  fringed  gold,  surmounted  by 
a  banner  tierced  in  pale  vert,  argent,  and  gules. 

IVES.     See  St  Ives. 


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JAEN,  Province  of  (Andalusia,  Spain).  Quarterly  or  and  gules,  within  a  bordure 
compony  of  Leon  and  Castile. 

JAMAICA.  Argent,  on  a  cross  gules  five  pines  or.  C^-est — On  a  log  an  alligator. 
Supporters — (Dexter)  a  female  Indian  wearing  an  apron  of  feathers,  a  single 
feather  bound  to  her  forehead,  in  her  exterior  hand  a  basket  of  fruit  and  flowers  ; 
(sinister)  an  Indian  warrior  wearing  an  apron  and  crown  of  feathers,  in  his  ex- 
terior hand  a  bow  stringed.     Motto — "  Indus  uterque  serviet  uni." 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.  Granted  by  Warrant,  3rd  February 
1661.] 

These  arms,  unlike  other  colonial  arms,  are  always  represented  with  a  royal 
helmet  and  a  mantling.  See  an  article  in  the  Genealogical  Magazine,  September 
and  October  1899,  pp.  200  and  241. 

JAMAICA,  See  of.  Gules,  a  crozier  and  a  key  in  saltire  surmounted  by  an  open 
book  or  in  the  fesse  point,  in  chief  a  lion  passant  guardant  or,  and  in  base  a 
pine  apple  proper. 

[Gts.,  XXXV.  248.     College  of  Arms.] 

JAMAICA,  Churchwardens  of  St  James,  in.  Argent,  a  palmer's  staff  erect, 
depending  from  its  rest  by  a  leathern  thong,  a  gourd  both  proper,  on  a  bordure 
gules  five  pine  apples  or. 

\Vide  Local  Act,  7  Vict.,  cap.  39,  cited  (p.  4)  in  Roby's  "  History  of  the 
Parish  of  St  James  in  Jamaica,"  1849.] 


396 


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JAMAICA 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

JAPAN.     Device  or  "  Mon,"  A  chrysanthemum  or,  the  petals  fimbriated  argent. 

The  national  flag,  of  which  much  use  is  made  as  a  national  device,  is  white, 
charged  with  a  red  rising  sun. 

JAPAN,  See  of.  Argent,  a  cross  gules,  on  a  chief  barry  wavy  of  the  first  and  azure, 
the  sun  rising  or. 

[Of  no  authority.     This  See  is  now  divided  into  the  four  dioceses  of  Kynshu 
or  South  Japan,  Osaka,  South  Tokyo,  and  Hokkaido,  to  which  refer.] 

JARROW,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

JARROW-ON-TYNE  (Durham).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

JEDBURGH  (Roxburghshire).  The  entry  in  Lyon  Register  is  as  follows  : — 
"The  Royall  Burgh  of  Jedburgh  gives  for  Ensigncs  Arnioriall  Gules  on  a  horse 
saliant  argent  furnished  azure,  a  chevalier  armed  at  all  points,  grasping  in  his 
right  hand  a  kynde  of  launce  (called  the  Jedburgh  staff)  proper.  The  Motto 
in  ane  escroU,  '  Strenue  et  prospere.'  " 

JERSEY.     Refer  to  Channel  Islands. 

JERSEY.     Refer  to  New  Jersey. 

JERSEY,  Dean  of.     Argent,  three  bends  gules. 
[Of  no  authority.] 


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JERSEY,  DEAN  OF 


JEDBURGH 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
JERUSALEM.     Argent,  a  cross  potent  between  four  cross  crosslets  or. 

JERUSALEM,  St  John  of.     Refer  to  St  John. 

JERUSALEM,  See  of.  Argent,  a  Hebrew  inscription  meaning  "Oh,  pray  for  the 
peace  of  Jerusalem,"  between  two  estoiies  in  chief  and  a  dove  with  its  olive  branch 
in  base,  all  proper,  on  a  chief  per  pale  gules  and  argent  in  the  first  a  lion  passant 
guardant  or,  in  the  second  an  eagle  displayed  sable. 

[The  chief  is  now  of  gules  only  bearing  the  lion,  and  the  eagle  is  omitted.] 
[Neither  version  is  of  any  authority.] 

JESTS,  REVELLS  and  MASQUES  of  our  Lord  the  King-  in  Ireland,  Office  of. 

Refer  to  Office  of  Jests,  etc. 

JESUS'  COLLEGE,  Oxford.  (Founded  by  Queen  Elizabeth,  1571.)  Azure,  three 
stags  trippant  argent,  being  the  arms  of  Hugh  Price,  Doctor  of  Laws,  who 
contributed  largely  to  the  building.  According  to  the  University  Calendar 
the  arms  in  use  are  "  Vert  three  stags  trippant  or,"  which  are  the  arms  of 
Greene  or  Robinson. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

JESUS'  COLLEGE,  Cambridge.  (Founded  in  1497  by  John  Alcock,  Chancellor 
of  England.)  Argent,  a  fesse  'oetween  three  cocks'  heads  erased  sable, 
crested  and  jelloped  gules,  all  within  a  bordure  of  the  third,  charged  with 
eight  ducal  coronets  of  the  fourth.  Crest — On  a  ducal  coronet  or,  a  cock 
sable  crested  and  jelloped  gules. 

[Recorded   in   the  College  of  Arms.     These   were  originally   the  arms   of 
Alcock.] 


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JESUS'  COLLEGE  (CAMBRIDGE) 


JERUSALEM,  SEE  OF 


JESUS'  COLLEGE  (OXFORD) 


2  C 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

JOHANNESBURG  (Transvaal,   S.   Africa).     Vert,  a  fesse  between   three  gold- 
stamps  or. 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms.] 

JOHNSTONE.     Has  no  armorial  bearings.     The  seal  shows  a  cross  between  i,  a 
spinning-wheel ;  2,  a  pair  of  scales;  3,  a  beam-engine;  4,  a  bee-hive.     Crest — A 
lion  rampant.     Motto — "  Gang  forward." 
[Bogus.] 

JOINERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  14th  April  1570.) 
Gules,  a  chevron  argent  between  two  pairs  of  compasses  in  chief  extended  at 
the  points,  and  a  sphere  in  base  or:  on  a  chief  of  the  last  a  pale  azure  between 
two  roses  gules,  seeded  of  the  third,  barbed  vert,  on  the  pale  an  escallop  of  the 
second.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  demi-savage  proper,  wreathed 
about  the  head  and  waist  with  leaves  vert,  holding  in  his  dexter  hand  over  his 
shoulder  a  tilting-spear  or,  headed  argent.  Supporters — Two  naked  boys  proper, 
the  dexter  holding  in  his  hand  an  emblematical  female  figure  crowned  with  a 
mural  coronet  sable,  the  sinister  holding  in  his  hand  a  square.  Motto — "  Join 
Loyalty  and  Liberty."  (Another  Motto—''  Join  truth  with  trust.") 
[Of  no  authority.] 

JOINERS  (Durham).     Refer  to  Carpenters. 

JOINERS'  COMPANY  (Metz).     Gules,  on  a  chevron  argent,  a  torteau. 

JOINERS'  COMPANY  (Peronne).     Argent,  a  saltire  paly  of  six  sable  and  or. 

JOINERS'  COMPANY  (Amiens).     Argent,  two  pales  indented  sable. 

JULIERS.     Or,  a  lion  rampant  sable,  crowned  of  the  field. 

JUSTICE-GENERAL  OF  ARGYLLSHIRE.     Refer  to  Argyll,  Duke  of 


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JOINEI?S,   COMPANY  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

KARLSRUE.     Refer  to  Carlsruhe. 

KAZAN.     Refer  to  Russia. 

KAZAN    (Russia).      Argent,   a    wyvern  sable,  crowned    or,  winged,  armed,   and 
vomiting  flames  of  fire  gules. 

KEBLE    COLLEGE  (Oxford).      Has   no   arm.s.      Those    in    use   are  argent,   a 
chevron  engrailed  gules  on  a  chief  azure,  three  mullets  pierced  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

KEELING  ISLANDS  (otherwise  Cocos  Islands).     Refer  to  Straits  Settlements. 

KEEWATIN,  See  of.     Has  no  arms. 

KEIGHLEY  (Yorkshire).     Argent,  on   a  fesse  sable,  between  three  stags'  heads 
caboshed  a  fountain  proper,  all  within  a  bordure  embattled  azure.     And  for  the 
Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  in  front  of  a  dragon's  head  erased  gules, 
entwined  by  a  serpent  or,  a  fountain  proper.     Motto — "  By  Worth." 
Granted  7th  February  1883. 

Burke's  "  General  Armory  "  adds  a  description  of  the  arms  as  follows  : — 
"  The  Crest  (a  red  dragon)  was  that  of  the  ancient  family  of  De  Kighley, 
for  many  generations  Lords  of  the  Manor,  whose  last  representative  (a  female) 
married  the  then  head  of  the  house  of  Cavendish  in  the  time  of  Queen 
Elizabeth,  and  thereby  carried  the  Keighley  estate  into  that  noble  house,  of 
which  the  Duke  of  Devonshire  is  the  head.  His  Grace  still  retains  the  estate, 
which  has  belonged  to  his  family  for  nearly  700  years.  The  serpent  twined 
round  the  head  of  the  dragon  is  the  Cavendish  Crest.  The  circle  with  the  wavy 
blue  lines  at  the  bottom  of  the  Crest,  and  also  repeated  in  the  shield,  is  the 
heraldic  emblem  of  water  technically  called  a  fountain,  and  refers  to  the  situa- 
tion of  Keighley  in  a  well-watered  valley,  the  streams  of  which  have  greatly 
tended  towards  the  progress  of  the  town,  being  of  great  value  for  manufacturing 
purposes.  This  idea  is  also  borne  out  by  the  motto  '  By  Worth,'  that  being  the 
name  of  the  principal  stream  on  the  banks  of  which  Keighley  is  situate.  The 
shield  is  a  combination  of  the  Keighley  and  Cavendish  arms.  The  silver  shield 
and  black  bar  being  those  of  the  former  family,  while  the  three  stags'  heads  are 
the  cognizance  of  the  Cavendishes.  The  blue  embattled  border  surrounding  the 
shield  shows  that  the  arms  are  those  of  an  ancient  town,  which  is  the  case, 
Keighley  having  obtained  its  original  market  charter  in  the  reign  of  Edward  I." 

KEITH  (Banffshire).     Has  no  arms,  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 


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KAZAN 


L  [C 


KEIGHLEY 


THE   BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

KELLIE,  Earldom  of.  Gules,  the  Royal  Crown  of  Scotland,  within  a  double 
treasure,  flory  and  counterflory  or. 

[This  is  a  coat  of  augmentation  for  the  Earldom  of  Kellie,  matriculated  in 
Lyon  Register  and  borne  surmounted  by  an  Earl's  coronet  in  the  centre  of  their 
arms  by  the  Earls  of  Mar  and  Kellie.] 

KELLS  (Co.  Meath),  anciently  Kenlis.  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in 
Ulster's  Office.     The  seal  represents  a  castle,  and  this  does  duty  when  required. 

KELSO  (Co.  Roxburgh).  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  shows  the  arms  of  Scotland 
pendent  from  a  thistle  with  a  bird  on  each  side. 

KELVINSIDE  ACADEMY  (Glasgow).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Uses  a  device 
of  the  head  of  Athene  in  profile. 

KENDAL  (Westmoreland).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents 
presumably  (?)  a  view  of  the  town,  the  only  inscription  being  15KK76.  A  coat- 
of-arms  has  been  sent  to  me,  but  it  defies  description.  It  is  quarterly  gules  and 
azure  in  the  first  and  fourth  quarters  three  .  .  .  and  in  the  second  and  third 
three  ...  all  or.     Motto — "  Pannus  mihi  panis." 

KENSINGTON,  Royal  Borough  of  (London).  Quarterly  gules  and  or,  a 
celestial  crown  in  chief  and  a  fleur-de-lis  in  base  of  the  last,  in  the  dexter  canton 
a  mullet  argent  in  the  first  quarter  :  a  cross  flory  between  four  martlets  sable 
in  the  second  :  a  cross  botonny  gules  between  four  roses  of  the  last  stalked  and 
leaved  proper  in  the  third  :  a  mitre  of  the  second  in  the  fourth  :  all  within  a 
bordure  quarterly  also  or  and  sable. 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  23rd  May  1901.] 

KENSINGTON,   Bishop  of     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

KENT.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Berry  gives  "  Gules  a  horse  saliant  argent. 
It  is,  however,  more  usually  depicted  rampant. 

KERRY,  County  of     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

KIDDERMINSTER.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  in  regular  use,  which  are 
given  in  Debrett's  "  House  of  Commons,"  are,  Azure,  on  two  chevronels  or, 
between  three  bezants,  eight  pellets.  Motto — "  Deo  juvante  arte  et  industria 
floret." 

KIDDERMINSTER   INN,  or   SIX   CLERKS'   OFFICE   (London).      Azure, 
two  chevronels  or,  each  charged  with  four  gunstones  proper,  between  three  plates. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

KIDSGROVE  (Staffordshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  A  landscape  showing 
three  kids  in  a  grove  of  trees  has  been  placed  upon  an  escutcheon  and  attributed 
to  the  town. 

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KENSINGTON,  ROYAL  BOROUGH  OF 


KENT 


KIDDERMINSTER 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

KIDWELLY  (Carmarthenshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents 
upon  an  escutcheon  a  cat  passant  towards  the  sinister,  with  the  legend,  "  The 
Common  Seal  of  the  Borough  of  Kidwelly." 

KIEFF  (Russia).  Azure,  St  (?  Michael)  vested  proper,  winged  and  his  head 
within  a  nimbus  or,  his  dexter  hand  holding  a  sword  erect  wavy  and  on  his 
sinister  arm  a  buckler,  all  proper. 

KIEL  (Germany).     Gules,  an  inescutcheon  per  fesse  of  the  field  and  argent  charged 
with  a  boat  in  base  proper,  surrounded   by  three  passion  nails  in  pairle  points 
towards  the  centre  and  as  many  demi-nettle-leaves  alternately  argent. 
[Compare  the  arms  of  Holstein.] 

KILDARE,  County.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

KILDARE,  Town  of  (Co.  Kildare).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

KILDARE,  See  of.  Argent,  a  saltire  engrailed  gules,  on  a  chief  azure  an  open 
Bible  proper  garnished  and  clasped  or,  thereon  the  words  in  gold,  "  The  Law 
was  given  by  Moses,  but  grace  and  truth  came  by  Jesus  Christ." 

[These  arms  are  registered  in  Ulster's  Office  and  in  the  College  of  Arms, 
but  by  the  disestablishment  of  the  Irish  Church,  legally  they  are  now  extinct.] 

KILDARE.     Refer  to  Dublin,  Glendalough,  and  Kildare,  Archbishop  of. 

KILFENORA,  See  of.     Argent,  a  rose  gules,  on  a  chief  sable,  three  mullets  or. 

[These  arms  are  registered  in  Ulster's  Office,  but  by  the  disestablishment 
of  the  Irish  Church  they  are  now  legally  extinct.] 

KILFENORA.     Refer  to  Killaloe,  Kilfenora,  Clonfert,  and  Kilmacduagh. 

KILKENNY,  County  of.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

KILKENNY,  City  of  (Co.  Kilkenny).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  But  Burke  in 
his  "  General  Armory  "  quotes  the  following  as  a  coat : — Argent,  a  castle  of  three 
towers,  the  centre  one  the  tallest,  and  topped  with  a  spire,  on  each  of  the  others 
a  man  issuant,  shooting  an  arrow  from  a  bow,  all  proper,  in  base  on  a  mount 
vert,  a  lion  passant  guardant  gules.  In  a  sheet  of  "  Irish  Arms  "  published  by 
Messrs  Marcus  Ward  &  Co.,  Limited,  a  design  somewhat  similar  is  shown,  but 
the  editor  has  been  unable  to  obtain  any  authentic  drawing  of  the  coat. 


408 


\v-^^ 


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KIEL 


KILDARE,  SEE  OF 


KILFENORA,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

KILLALA,  See  of.  Gules,  a  crozier  in  pale  or,  suppressed  by  an  open  book  proper 
garnished  and  clasped  gold. 

[These  arms  are  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office,  but  through  the  disestablish- 
ment of  the  Irish  Church  are  now  really  extinct.] 

KILLALA.     Refer  to  Tuam,  Killala,  and  Achonry,  Bishop  of 

KILLALOE,  See  of  Ancient  Arms — Argent  a  cross  azure  between  four  trefoils 
slipped  vert,  on  a  chief  of  the  second  a  key  in  pale  or.  Modern  Arms — Argent 
a  cross  gules  between  twelve  trefoils  slipped  vert,  on  a  chief  azure  a  key  in 
pale  or. 

[These  last-mentioned  arms  are  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office  and  the  modern 
coat  remains  in  use,  but  through  the  disestablishment  of  the  Irish  Church  are 
really  extinct,  and  the  present  use  is  illegal.] 

KILLALOE,  KILFENORA,  CLONFERT,  AND  KILMACDUAGH,  Bishop  of. 

According  to  Crockford  only  the  arms  of  Killaloe  are  made  use  of,  but  Wood- 
ward gives  per  fesse  in  chief  Killaloe  and  in  base  Clonfert. 

KILMACDUAGH.  Refer  to  Killaloe,  Kilfenora,  Clonfert,  and  Kilmacduagh, 
Bishop  of 

KILMARNOCK  (Ayrshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings. 
Those  in  use  at  the  present  time  are  as  follows  : — Azure,  a  fesse  chequy  gules 
and  argent.  Crest — Upon  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  dexter  hand  erect  and 
apaumee,  couped  at  the  wrist,  the  third  and  fourth  fingers  folded  down  proper. 
Supporters — On  either  side  a  squirrel  proper.  Mottoes  over  the  crest, "  Confido," 
and  under  the  arms,  "  Virtute  et  industria." 


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KILLALA,  SEE  OF 


KILLALOE,  SEE  OF 


KILMARNOCK 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

KILMORE,  See  of.  Ancient  Arms — Argent  on  a  cross  sable  (Woodward  gives 
azure)  a  pastoral  staff  surmounted  of  a  mitre  sans  labels  or.  Modern  Arms — 
Argent  a  cross  gules,  in  each  quarter  five  trefoils  in  saltire  slipped  vert. 

[These  latter  arms  are  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office  and  the  modern  coat 
remains  in  use,  but  through  the  disestablishment  of  the  Irish  Church,  it  is  really 
extinct,  and  its  present  use  is  illegal.] 

KILMORE,  ELPHIN,  AND  ARDAGH,  Bishop  of.  According  to  Crockford 
only  the  modern  arms  of  the  See  of  Kilmore  are  made  use  of,  but  Woodward 
states  that  they  are  usually  combined  thus,  per  fess,  in  chief  Kilmore,  in  base 
Elphin  impaling  Ardagh. 

KILRENNY  (Fifeshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  Burke 
in  his  "General  Armory,"  however,  quotes  the  following : — "  Az.  an  open  boat 
in  the  sea  rowed  by  four  mariners  on  each  side,  the  pilot  at  the  helm,  a  hook 
suspended  [by  a  chain — Ed.]  from  the  side  of  the  boat  near  the  stern,  the 
rays  of  the  sun  issuing  from  a  cloud  in  chief  all  ppr."  Motto — "  Semper  tibi 
pendeat  [sic,  but  the  seal  has  it  "  pendiat " — Ed.]  hamus."  The  foregoing  is 
a  good  description  of  the  seal,  where  the  motto  with  the  addition  of  the  word 
"Kilrenny  "  takes  the  place  of  any  other  legend. 

KILS.YTH.     Has   no  arms,  but  has  a   fearful    and   wonderful   seal    divided    into 
quarters :   i  an  open  book,  2  two  claymores  in  saltire,  points  downwards,  3  two 
weavers'  shuttles  in  saltire,  4  a  pit  head,  over  all  an  inescutcheon,  per  pale  dexter 
three  gilly-flowers,  sinister  three  crescents  within  a  double  tressure. 
[Bogus.] 

KILWINNING  (Ayrshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The 
seal  represents  under  a  Gothic  canopy  a  figure  of  St  Winning  (a  Scottish  saint 
of  the  eighth  century),  holding  in  his  dexter  hand  a  crozier,  and  in  his  sinister 
a  closed  book.     Legend,  "  Burgh  of  Kilwinning.     Sine  Te  Domine  cuncta  nil." 

KINCARDINESHIRE.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

KING  AND  QUEEN'S  COLLEGE  OF  PHYSICIANS.     Refer  to  Physicians. 

KINGHORN  (Fifeshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The  seal 
which  has  been  forwarded  to  me  represents  a  triple-towered  castle,  each  tower 
domed  and  the  centre  tower  ensigned  with  a  cross  pattee,  and  on  either  side 
of  the  castle  a  mullet  of  five  points.  The  editor  thinks  there  may  be  some 
connection  between  this  seal  and  the  arms  of  Kirkcaldy  (to  which  refer).  The 
Catalogue  of  the  Heraldic  E.vhibition  in  Edinburgh  mentions  three  seals,  two 
as  described  above,  and  another  representing  a  full-length  figure  of  St  Leonard. 

KING  EDWARD'S  SCHOOL  (Birmingham).  Uses  the  arms  of  King  Edward 
VI.,  viz.,  Quarterly:  i  and  4  France,  2  and  3  England.  Motto — "Domine 
salvum  fac  regem." 

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KILMORE,  SEE  OF 


KILKENNY 


KING  EDWARD'S  SCHOOL  (BIRMINGHAM) 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

KING'S  COLLEGE  (Cambridge).  (Founded  in  1441.  by  Henry  VI.)  Sable,  three 
roses  argent  barbed  vert,  seeded  or,  on  a  chief  per  pale  azure  and  gules  a  fleur- 
de-lis  on  the  dexter  or,  and  a  lion  passant  guardant  on  the  sinister  of  the  last. 

[These  arms  were  granted  by  King  Henry  VI.  by  Letters  Patent  under  the 
Great  Seal,  1441.  See  "  Excerpta  Historica,"  p.  362.  Recorded,  College  of 
Arms.] 

KING'S  COUNTY.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

KING'S   HALL   (Cambridge).     Gules,  three  lions  passant  guardant   in    pale   or 
within  a  bordure  engrailed  ermine. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

KING'S  LYNN  or  LYNN  REGIS  (Norfolk).  Azure,  three  dragons'  heads 
erased  and  erect  or,  in  the  mouth  of  each  a  cross  crosslet  fitchee  also  erect 
of  the  last.  These  are  quoted  by  Burke,  and  are  usually  drawn  as  conger  eels' 
heads,  but  they  should  be  dragons  according  to  the  record  in  Visitation  Books 
at  the  College  of  Arms.  A  crest  is  made  use  of,  namely,  a  pelican  vulning 
herself,  but  this  is  of  no  authority. 

The  dragons'  heads  from  which  issue  the  crosses  are  said  to  typify  St 
Margaret,  the  patron  saint  of  the  town.  The  old  legend  respecting  this  saint 
may  or  may  not  be  familiar.  In  her  early  youth  being  converted  into  the 
modes  of  thought  and  habit  then  current  under  the  guise  of  Christianity,  she 
was  compelled  to  fly  from  her  home.  She  became  a  shepherdess  in  far-off 
lands,  when  the  wicked  lord  of  the  country  being  enamoured  of  her  beauty 
sought,  against  the  lady's  wish,  to  obtain  possession  of  her.  St  Margaret  being 
obstreperous,  was  cast  into  the  inevitable  dungeon,  in  which  she  had  the 
company,  more  or  less  inviting,  of  the  equally  inevitable  dragon.  Being  greatly 
terrified,  she  became  an  easy  prey  to  the  beast,  who  seems  to  have  been  in  the 
habit  of  bolting  its  food,  for  St  Margaret  only  recovered  her  wits  in  her  new 
quarters  inside  the  dragon.  She  commenced  to  pray,  making  the  sign  of  the 
cross,  when  immediately  the  creature  burst  open  and  St  Margaret  was, 
according  to  history,  little  the  worse  for  her  adventure. 

KINGS  OF  ARMS.     Refer  to  Garter,  Lyon,  Ulster,  Clarenceux,  Norroy,  Bath. 

KING'S   SCHOOL    (Canterbury).      Azure,   on    a   cross   argent   the    letter   "X" 
surmounted  by  the  letter  "  I." 
[Of  no  authority.] 


414 


KING'S   COLLEGE  (CAMBRIDGE) 


KING'S  HALL  (CAMBRIDGE) 


■ 

• 

I 

X 

■ 

KING'S  SCHOOL  (CANTERBURY) 


KING'S  LYNN 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

KING'S  SCHOOL  (Chester).     Uses  the  arms  of  King  Henry  VHI.,  the  founder, 
viz.,  France  and  England  quarterly.     Motto — "Rex  dedit  benedicat  Deus." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

KING'S  REMEMBRANCER  OF  THE  EXCHEQUER.  Refer  to  Remem- 
brancer. 

KINGSTON  (Co.  Dublin).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

KINGSTON,  City  of  (Jamaica).  Argent,  a  chevron  embattled  azure  between  two 
pine-apples  in  chief,  and  on  a  mount  a  coffee-tree  in  base  proper,  on  a  chief  wavy 
gules  a  lion  passant  guardant  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  demi 
South  American  Indian,  the  dexter  arm  embracing  a  cornucopia  inverted,  in  the 
sinister  hand  a  bundle  of  sugar-canes  all  proper,  and  on  an  escroU  over  the  crest 
the  words  "  Regis  opus."  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  lion  rampant  guardant  or, 
murally  crowned  azure,  charged  on  the  breast  with  a  conch  proper  ;  (sinister) 
Neptune,  his  mantle  of  a  marine  green,  edged  argent,  on  his  head  an  Eastern 
crown  or,  his  breast  charged  with  a  conch  as  on  the  dexter,  his  trident  erect 
proper  resting  on  the  exterior  arm.  Motto — "  Natura  monstrat  perficit  industria." 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

KINGSTON-ON-THAMES  (Surrey).     Azure,  three  salmon  naiant  in  pale  proper. 

Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms. 

The  seal  shows  this  escutcheon,  but  in  base  the  letter  R  (?  for  Regis  or 
Royal),  and  it  so  appears  upon  the  seal  of  the  County  Council  of  Surrey. 
Burke's  "General  Armory,"  quotes  the  salmon  as  haurient,  and  mentions  a 
seal  representing  a  tun,  and  over  it  a  Saxon  K,  the  whole  encircled  b\-  two 
olive  branches. 

KINGSTON-ON-THAMES,  Bishop  of     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

KINGSTON-UPON-HULL.     See  Hull. 

KINGUSSIE  (Inverness-shire).  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  shows  a  crest  on  a 
wreath,  a  pine-tree  supported  by  two  wild  cats  rampant  guardant,  (above) 
"  Cinn  a'  Ghudibhsaich."     Motto — "  Lean  gu  dluth  ri  cliu  do  shinnsear." 


416 


KING'S  SCHOOL  (CHESTER) 


KINGSTON-ON-THAMES 


KINGSTON,  CITY  OF  (JAMAICA) 


?P 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

KINNINGPARK  (Co.  Renfrew).     Has    no    arms.     Those    upon    the    seal  are  A 
beehive.     Crest — A  terrestrial  globe.     Motto — "  Industry." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

KINROSS,  County  of     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

KINROSS.  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  shows  on  an  escutcheon  a  representation  of 
the  old  Market  Cross.     Motto — "Siccar." 

KINSALE  (Co.  Cork).  Chequy  argent  and  sable.  These  arms  are  not  registered 
in  Ulster's  Office  but  appear  upon  a  seal  of  the  Corporation  which  has  the 
legend,  "  The  Armes  of  the  Corporation  of  Kinsale."  A  tree,  and  a  bird 
perched  on  a  dexter  branch  thereof,  appears  to  be  growing  from  the  top  of  the 
escutcheon.  This  may  perhaps  be  intended  for  a  Crest;  but  in  another  seal 
it  simply  appears  as  a  foliated  ornament. 

KINTORE  (Aberdeenshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The 
seal,  which  is  a  pointed  oval,  shows  a  design  of  a  botanical  character.  Legend, 
"S'  commune  de  Kintor." 

KIRKCALDY  (Fifeshire).  "The  entry  in  Lyon  Register  is  as  follows :—"  The 
Royall  Burgh  of  Kirkaldie  gives  for  ensignes  armoriall  azur  ane  Abbay  of  three 
Pyramids  argent  each  ensigned  with  a  cross  patee  or.  And  on  the  reverse  of 
the  Seall  is  Insculped  in  a  field  azur  the  figure  of  St  Bryse  with  long  garments, 
on  his  head  a  mytre,  in  the  dexter  a  flower-delis.  The  sinister  laid  upon  his 
brest  all  proper.  Standing  in  y'=  porch  of  the  church  or  Abbay.  Ensigned  on 
the  top  as  before  all  betwixt  a  descrescent  &  a  star  in  fess  or.  The  motto  is 
Vigilando  munio.  And  round  the  Escutcheon  of  both  sydes  these  words, 
Sigillum  Civitatis  Kirkaldie." 

KIRKCUDBRIGHT,  County  of     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

KIRKCUDBRIGHT  (County  of  Kirkcudbright).  Has  not  matriculated  any 
armorial  bearings.  The  seal  at  present  in  use  represents  a  three-masted  ship 
with  sails  furled.  But  a  copy  of  a  more  ancient  one,  which  represents  upon  an 
escutcheon  an  antique  one-masted  ship,  and  seated  therein  the  Virgin  and  Child, 
apparently  does  duty  for  armorial  insignia,  being  embossed  upon  the  Town 
Clerk's  notepaper. 

KIRKINTILLOCH  (Dumbartonshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  and  its  seal  is 
not  heraldic. 

KIRKWALL  (Orkney).     Party  per  fesse  wavy  or  and  azure,  an   ancient  three- 
masted  ship  of  the  first,  sails  furled,  masts  and  rigging  proper,  flags  and  pennons 
gules,  each  having  a  canton   of  the  second    charged   with  a  St  Andrew's  Cross 
argent.     In  an  escroU  below  the  shield  is  placed  this  motto,  "  Si  Deus  nobiscum." 
[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  nth  November  1886.] 

418 


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KINNINGPARK 


KIRKCALDY 


KIRKWALL 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

KIRRIEMUIR  (Co.  Forfar).      Has  no  armorial  bearings.    The  seal  shows  the  arms 
of  Douglas,  viz.,  Argent,  a  human  heart  imperially  crowned  proper,  on  a  chief 
azure,  three  mullets  argent.     Motto — "  Jamais  arriere." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

KISCHINEFF  (Russia).  Azure,  a  bull's  head  caboshed  or,  armed  and  langued 
gules,  in  chief  a  mullet  of  five  points  or,  in  dexter  base  a  rose  and  in  sinister  base 
an  increscent,  both  argent,  a  bordure  compony  alternately  or,  sable,  and  argent. 

KLAGENFURT  (Austria).  Azure,  on  a  mount  in  base  a  tower  argent,  and  in 
front  thereof  a  dragon  volant  fesseways  vert. 

KNARESBOROUGH,  Bishop  of     Asa  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

KNARESBOROUGH  (Yorkshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal 
represents  a  castle  in  base,  on  an  escroll  four  letters,  namely  ERQR,  over  the 
castle,  on  a  wreath  a  dexter  hand  in  armour,  couped  at  the  wrist,  holding  a 
branch  of  acorns,  the  date  i6i  i. 

KNITTERS'  COMPANY.     Refer  to  Framework  Knitters. 

KONIGSBERG  (Prussia).  Three  escutcheons  arranged  two  and  one  (i)  per  fesse 
argent  and  gules,  in  chief  an  open  crown  and  in  base  a  Maltese  cross  or,  (2) 
azure,  an  open  crown  between  two  mullets  of  six  points  in  pale  or,  (3)  vert, 
issuing  from  clouds  in  base  a  dexter  arm  proper,  habited  azure,  cuffed  argent, 
holding  in  the  hand  also  proper  an  open  crown  between  two  hunting-horns  pale- 
ways  or. 


420 


KISCHINEFF 


KIRRIEMUIR 


KLAGENFURT 


KONIGSBERG 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
KOREA.     The  intertwined  "  mon  "  of  good  luck  of  red  and  blue. 
KRAKAU  (Galicia,  Austria).     Refer  to  Cracow. 

KREFELD  (Germany).  Or,  a  bishop  mitred  proper,  vested  azure,  holding  in  his 
dexter  hand  a  crozier  and  in  his  sinister  a  mitre,  at  his  feet  an  inescutcheon  of 
the  field  charged  with  a  fesse  sable. 

KRONSTADT  (Russia).     Azure,  an  open  crown  or. 

KWANGSI  AND  HUNAN,  See  of     Argent,  a  Passion  cross  or  surmounted  in 
base  by  an  open  book  proper,  on  either  side  of  the  horizontal  limbs  of  the  cross 
some  Oriental  hierogylphics. 
[Of  no  authority.] 


422 


KOREA 


KRONSTADT 


KREFELD 


KWANGSI  AND  HUNAN,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

KYUSHU,  See  of.     Argent,  on  a  cross  gules  an  open  book  proper,  on  a  chief  wavy 
azure  a  demi-sun  in  splendour. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

LABRADOR.     No  warrant  assigning  arms  has  ever  been  issued  to  Labrador. 

LABUAN.  No  official  warrant  assigning  arms  has  as  yet  been  issued  to  Labuan. 
The  device  published  by  the  Admiralty  is  a  landscape  disc,  thereon  in  the  sea, 
a  two-masted  ship  in  full  sail  in  front  of  a  mountain  from  behind  which  the  sun 
is  rising. 

LABUAN.     See  Singapore,  Labuan,  and  Sarawak,  See  of. 

LABUAN  AND  SARAWAK,  See  of.  Per  pale  gules  and  sable  a  cross  bottony 
fitchee  or. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

LADYBANK.     Has  no  armorial  bearings.     The  seal  shows  an  escutcheon  per  pale 
dexter,  a  nun  holding  a  scroll,  sinister  an  ecclesiastic,  in  his  dexter  hand  a  crozier 
and  in  his  sinister  a  book. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

LAGOS.     No  warrant  assigning  arms  has  as  yet  been  issued  to  Lagos. 

LAHORE,  See  of.  Azure,  on  a  fesse  ermine,  a  passion  cross  in  bend  dexter  sur- 
mounted by  a  crozier  in  bend  sinister  or,  in  chief  rising  from  behind  two  snow 
mountains  issuing  from  the  fesse  a  sun  in  splendour  and  in  base  five  barrulets 
wavy  argent. 

[College  of  Arms.     Gts.,  Ix.  96.] 


424 


KYUSHU,  SEE  OF 


LABUAN  AND  SARAWAK,  SEE  OF 


LAHORE,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LAMBETH,  Borough  of  (London).  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  shows  two 
escutcheons,  the  one  of  the  Archiepiscopal  See  of  Canterbury,  the  other  the 
Duchy  of  Cornwall,  below  these  a  lamb  passant  on  a  mount  and  underneath  the 
word  "  Hythe." 

LAMPETER  (Cardiganshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents 
a  bridge  of  three  arches,  with  the  legend,  "  Borough  of  Lampeter." 

LANARK,  The  Commissioners  of  Supply  for  the  County  of  Parted  per  chevron 
gules  and  argent,  two  cinquefoils  pierced  in  chief,  and  a  man's  heart  in  base 
counterchanged.  Above  the  shield  is  placed  an  esquire's  helmet  with  a  mantling 
gules' doubled  argent,  and  on  a  wreath  of  the  proper  liveries  is  set  for  Crest — 
A  demi-eagle  displayed  with  two  heads  sable,  breaked  gules,  and  in  an  escroU 
over  the  same  this  Motto,  "  Vigilantia." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  21st  December  1886.] 

LANARK  (Lanarkshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  Those  in 
in  use  are  as  follows : — Argent,  an  eagle  with  two  heads  displayed  sable,  beaked 
and  membered  gules,  a  bell  azure  pendent  from  the  dexter  leg  by  a  string  of 
the  last,  in  chief  two  lions  counter-passant  of  the  third,  and  in  base  as  many 
salmon  naiant  from  the  centre. 

LANCASHIRE  (The  County  Council  of  the  County  Palatine  of  Lancaster). 
Gules,  three  piles,  two  issuant  from  the  chief  and  one  in  base  or,  each  charged 
with  a  rose  of  the  field,  barbed  and  seeded  proper.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours  a  lion  passant  guardant  proper,  charged  on  the  body  with  a  masclc  gules 
and  resting  the  dexter  fore-paw  on  an  escocheon  of  the  above  said  arms.  Motto 
— "  In  concilio  consilium."  Supporters — On  either  side,  a  lion  proper,  gorged 
with  a  collar  vair,  pendant  therefrom  an  escocheon  of  the  following  arms,  viz., 
Gules,  three  piles,  two  issuant  from  the  chief  and  one  in  base  or,  each  charged 
with  a  rose  gules  barbed  and  seeded  proper. 

[Arms  and  crest  granted  August  31,  1903,  by  Sir  Albert  Woods,  G.C.V.O., 
K.C.M.G.,  Garter  King  of  Arms,  G.  E.  Cokayne,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms,  and 
W.  H.,  Weldon,  C.V.O.,  Norroy  King  of  Arms.  The  Supporters  were  granted  by 
Sir  Albert  Woods,  Garter,  October  26th,  following.] 


426 


LANARK 


LANARK,  COMMISSIONERS  OF  SUPPLY  FOR 
THE  COUNTY  OF 


LANCASHIRE,  COUNTY  COUNCIL  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LANCASTER,  Borough  of  (Lancashire).  Per  fesse  azure  and  gules  in  chief  a  fleur- 
de-lis  and  in  base  a  lion  passant  guardant  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours 
a  lion  passant  guardant  azure,  seme-de-lis  or.  Supporters — On  either  side,  a  lion 
rampant  guardant  azure,  seme-de-lis  and  gorged  with  a  collar  or,  pendent  there- 
from an  escocheon  argent,  charged  with  a  rose  gules,  barbed  and  seeded  proper. 
Motto—"  Luck  to  Loyne." 

[Arms  re-confirmed  and  Crest  and  Supporters  granted,  July  19,  1907.] 

LANCASTER,  Duchy  of.  Gules,  three  lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  or,  a  label 
of  three  points  throughout  argent.     Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms. 

LANCASTER  HERALD.    Budge^A.  rose  gules,  crowned  with  the  Imperial  crown. 

LANDAFF.     See  Llandaff. 

• 

LANGHOLM,  Police  Borough  of  (Dumfriesshire).  According  to  the  Edinburgh 
Eventing  Dispatch  of  26th  October,  1893,  has  just  adopted  a  seal.  It  would  be 
difficult  to  add  to  the  humour  of  the  description,  or  render  more  patent  the 
sublime  ridiculousness  and  ignorance  of  its  designer.  The  description  there 
given  is  as  follows  : — 

"  The  above"  (see  illustration — Ed.)  "  is  a  representation  of  the  Seal  which 
has  just  been  adopted  by  the  Police  Commissioners  of  the  Burgh.  The  articles 
represented  on  the  shield  are,  with  the  exception  of  the  sheep  or  fleece  at  the 
bottom,  identified  with  the  annual  festival  of  riding  the  marches  at  Langholme. 
On  the  top  quarter  is  a  thistle,  in  the  centre  of  which  is  a  crown,  this  crown 
being  composed  of  flowers,  and  carried  in  procession  at  the  Common  Riding. 
On  the  side  quarters  are  a  heather  bedecked  spade  (with  which  a  sod  or  two  is 
cut  each  year),  and  a  barley-bannock  "  (O  land  of  cakes  !  ),  "  with  a  salt  herring 
nailed  across  it,  and  with  the  letters  B.B.  on  it.  This  is  a  representation  of  the 
fare  with  which  the  natives  used  to  regale  themselves,  and  such  a  bannock  is 
carried  in  procession  at  the  Common  Riding.  The  sheep  or  fleece  is  represen- 
tative of  the  woollen  trade,  which  is  the  staple  trade  of  the  town." 

That  this  design  is  placed  upon  an  escutcheon  (and  herein  lies  its  iniquity 
and  absurdity),  that  the  field  is  azure,  and  that  the  before-mentioned  charges 
(save  the  mark !  )  are  separated  by  a  saltire  argent,  the  eloquent  description 
above  quoted  of  course  omits  to  state,  probably  through  the  lack  of  heraldic 
knowledge  on  the  part  of  its  writer.  The  legend  is  "  The  Commissioners  of 
the  Burgh  of  Langholme."  Might  the  editor  be  permitted  further  to  remark, 
that,  for  a  coat-of-arms,  this  design  "  takes  the  cake  "  ? 

LARGS  (Ayrshire).     Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  intended  to  be  heraldic. 
LASSWADE.      Has  no  arms.     The  seal  shows  a  tree  and  the  motto  "  Floreat." 

LAUDER  (Berwickshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The 
seal,  which  is  of  very  crude  workmanship,  represents  the  Holy  Virgin  and  Child, 
with  the  legend,  "  Insignia  Burgi  De  Lauder." 

428 


LANCASTER,  BOROUGH  OF 


LANCASTER,  DUCHY  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LAUENBORG.     Refer  to  Denmark. 

LAUNCESTON  or  DUNHEVED  ("The  Swelling  Hill"),  in  the  County  of 
Cornwall.  Gules,  a  triple  circular  tower  in  a  pyramidical  form  or,  all  within  a 
bordure  azure  charged  with  eight  towers  domed  of  the  second.  Crest — In  a 
ducal  coronet  or,  a  lion's  head  gules,  between  two  ostrich  feathers  argent. 
Badge — A  keep  or  castle  gold. 

[Arms  and  Crest  granted  24th  July  1573.  Grant  printed  "  IVIisc.  Gen.  et. 
Her,"  Os.  iii.  128.     Badge  granted,  College  of  Arms,  March  26,  1907.] 

LAURENCEKIRK  (Co.  Kincardine).  Has  no  arms.  The  seal,  which  is  not 
heraldic,  represents  the  Tower  of  Johnston.     Motto — "  In  justice  secure." 

LAW,  College  of  Professors  of  Civil  and  Canon.     Refer  to  Doctors'  Commons.    / 

LAW  SCHOOL  OF  CAMBRIDGE.  Refer  to  Cambridge  University,  Regius 
Professors. 

LAW  SOCIETY.  Refer  to  Attorneys,  Solicitors  and  Proctors'  Society ;  and  also 
to  Incorporated  Law  Society  of  Ireland. 

LEAMINGTON  (Warwickshire),"  Borough  of  Royal  Leamington  Spa."  Per  fesse 
argent  and  or,  a  lion  rampant  double  queued  vert,  a  chevron  vair,  in  chief  three 
mullets  gules,  all  within  a  bordure  azure  charged  with  eight  fleurs-de-lis  of  the 
second.  And  for  the  crest.  On  a  wreath  of  the  colours  in  front  of  a  staff  raguly 
in  bend  argent  surmounted  by  a  staff  in  bend  sinister  or,  entwined  with  a  serpent 
proper,  two  sprigs  of  forget-me-nots  in  saltire  slipped,  also  proper.  Motto — 
"  Sola  bona  quae  honesta." 

[Granted  6th  November  1876.] 

LEATHERSELLERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London,  "The  Master 
and  Wardens  of  the  Company  or  Craft  of  Leathersellers  of  London."  (Incor- 
porated 1444.),  Argent,  three  roebucks  passant  regardant  gules,  attired  and 
unguled  sable.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  demi-roebuck  gules,  attired 
and  unguled  sable.  Livery  Colours — Argent  and  gules.  Mantling — Gules, 
doubled  ermine.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  roebuck  or,  attired  and  unguled 
sable,  (sinister)  a  ram  argent,  armed  and  unguled  or.  Motto — "  Soli  Deo 
Honor  et  Gloria."     (Another  form,  "  Deo  Honor  et  Gloria.") 

[Granted  by  Moore,  Norroy,  20th  May  1479.  Misc.  Gts.,  i.  50.  Supporters 
to  the  aforesaid  arms  impaling  qrly.  i  and  4,  the  arms  of  the  Glovers'  Company, 
q.v. ;  2  and  3,  Sable,  two  goats  respecting  each  other  argent,  attired  or.  Gtd.  by 
Richmond,  Clarenceux,  1505.  Misc.  Gts.,  i.  50/;,  and  iii.  10.  Vincent,  169, 
p.  71,  etc.,  but  this  form  is  never  used.  The  arms  as  first  given  were  re-exemplified 
in  the  College  of  Arms,  3rd  April  1905.] 


430 


LEAMINGTON 


LAUNCESTON 


LEATHERSELLERS,  COMPANY  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LEBOMBO,  See  of.     Gules,  two  keys  in  saltire  wards  downwards  argent,  on   a 
chief  of  the  last,  an  anchor  sable. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

LEEDS  (Yorkshire).  Azure,  a  fleece  or,  on  a  chief  sable  three  mullets  argent. 
Recorded  in  the  visitation  of  the  county  of  Yorkshire  in  1662.  A  crest,  An 
owl  argent,  and  supporters.  On  either  side  an  owl  argent  ducally  crowned  or, 
are  regularly  used,  but  are  of  no  authority.  Motto — "  Pro  Rege  et  Lege." 
Burke  in  his  "  General  Armory  "  gives  the  tinctures  azure,  a  fleece  or,  on  a 
chief  of  the  last  three  mullets  of  the  field  ;  but  the  arms  as  given  above,  though 
bad  heraldry,  are  correct. 

LEEDS  GRAMMAR    SCHOOL.     Argent,   three   books    conjoined    and    leaning 
against  each  other  proper,  on  a  chief  azure  a  fleece  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

LEEDS,  University  of     Refer  to  University  of  Leeds. 

LEEWARD  ISLANDS.  Barry  wavy  of  eight  azure  and  argent,  six  escutcheons, 
two  in  chief,  two  in  fesse  conjoined,  and  two  in  base  each  charged  with  a 
coloured  representation  of  one  of  the  respective  devices  used  on  the  public  seals 
of  the  Presidencies  of  the  Leeward  Islands,  viz.,  in  chief  Antigua  and  Dominica, 
in  fesse  St  Christopher  and  Nevis,  and  in  base  Montserrat  and  Virgin  Islands. 
Crest — Issuant  from  a  coronet  or,  a  pine-apple  proper. 
[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  loth  April  1909.] 

LEGHORN.     Refer  to  Livorno. 


4.32 


LEBOMBO,  SEE  OF 


LEEWARD  ISLANDS 


LEEDS 


2E 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LEICESTERSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  arms  of  the  town  of 
Leicester  are  usually  employed,  but  those  of  Lord  Howe,  the  Lord-Lieutenant 
of  the  county,  have  on  occasions  done  duty.  The  seal  of  the  County  Council 
simply  shows  a  view  of  an  embattled  and  ruined  gateway  within  the  legend 
"  Sigillum  comitatis  Leicestriae  Concillii." 

LEICESTER  (Leicestershire).  Gules,  a  cinquefoil  pierced  ermine.  Crest — A 
wyvern  sans  legs  ermine.  "  Motto — Semper  eadem."  Arms  confirmed  at  the  visita- 
tion of  the  county  in  1619. 

Burke  quarters  the  arms  of  England  with  it,  and  gives  the  crest  as  a  dragon 
with  wings  displayed  and  tail  nowed  ermine.  Berry,  whilst  leaving  the  crest  a 
wyvern,  blazons  it  "sans  legs  argent,  strewed  with  wounds  gules." 

LEICESTER,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

LEICESTER    COLLEGE    (Newark,    Co.    Nottingham).      Gule.s,   three    lions 
passant  guardant  or,  over  all  a  label  of  three  points  throughout  argent  charged 
with  nine  fleurs-de-lis. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

LEIGH,  Borough  of  (Lancashire).  Quarterly  gules  and  argent,  a  cross  quarterly 
counterchanged  between  a  spear-head  of  the  last  in  the  first  quarter,  a  mullet 
sable  in  the  second,  a  shuttle  fessewise,  the  thread  pendent  of  the  last  in  the 
third,  and  a  sparrow-hawk  close  proper  in  the  fourth.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of 
the  colours,  the  battlements  of  a  tower  proper,  issuant  therefrom  a  bear's  paw 
gules,  holding  a  javelin  erect  or.     Motto — "  ^quo  pede  propera." 

[Granted  by  Sir  Albert  Woods,  Garter,  G.  E.  Cokayne,  Clarenceux,  and 
W.  H.  Weldon,  Norroy,  23rd  December  1899.] 

LEIGHLIN,  refer  to  Ossory,  Ferns,  and  Leighlin,  and  as  to  arms  refer  to  Ferns. 

LEINSTER,  Province  of  (Ireland).     Vert,  an  Irish  harp  or,  stringed  argent. 
Recorded  in  Ulster's  Office. 

LEIPZIG  (Saxony).  Party  per  pale,  the  dexter  side  or,  a  lion  rampant  sable  (the 
arms  of  Margrave  von  Meissen),  the  sinister  side  or,  two  pallets  azure  (the  family 
arms  of  Wettmer  assumed  by  the  district  of  Landsberg.  Mantling — Azure  and 
or.  Crest — A  conical  hat  striped  in  vertical  bands  of  or  and  azure,  and  adorned  in 
front  with  a  plume  of  three  ostrich  feathers,  the  centre  one  azure,  the  exterior 
ones  or,  inserted  behind  the  turned-up  brim. 


434 


LEICESTER 


LEIGH 


LEINSTER 


LEIPZIG 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LEITH  (Edinburghshire).  Argent,  in  a  sea  proper,  an  ancient  galley  with  two 
masts,  sails  furled  sable,  flagged  gules,  seated  therein  the  Virgin  Mary  with  the 
Infant  Saviour  in  her  arms  and  a  cloud  resting  over  their  heads,  all  also  proper. 
In  an  escroll  below  the  shield  is  placed  this  motto,  "  Persevere." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register  the  27th  day  of  February  1889.] 

LEITRIM,  County.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

LEMBERG  (Austria).  Azure,  an  embattled  gateway  and  from  the  battlements 
three  towers  argent,  in  the  open  gateway  a  lion  rampant  or. 

LEOMINSTER  (Herefordshire).     Has  no  armorial  bearings.     Those  in  use  are, 
"  Or,  a  lion  rampant  gules,  bearing  in  its  sinister  paw  a  horned  lamb  proper. 
[These  arms  appear  on  the  silver  mace  but  are  of  no  official  authority.  ] 

LEON  (Kingdom  of).     Argent,  a  lion  rampant  gules,  crowned  or. 

LERWICK,  Burgh  of  Barony  of  (Shetland).  Has  Ensigns  Armorial,  namely,  or, 
in  a  sea  proper,  a  dragon  ship  vert  under  sail,  oars  in  action,  on  a  chief  gules 
a  battleaxe  fesseways  argent.  Above  the  shield  is  placed  a  suitable  helmet 
with  a  mantling  gules  doubled  argent,  and  on  a  wreath  of  the  proper  liveries 
is  set  for  Crest — A  raven  proper,  and  in  an  escroll  over  the  same  this  Motto — 
"  Dispecta  est  Thule." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  20th  April  1882.] 

LESLIE  (Fifeshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Its  shield  shows  a  weird 
escutcheon  divided  per  fesse  and  the  chief  per  pale,  containing  {a)  three  garbs, 
(3)  a  mill,  (r)  a  representation  of  one  of  the  ancient  entrances  now  disused  of 
Leslie  House.  Crest — A  demi-griffin.  Mottoes — (Over  crest)  "  grip  fast  "  ;  (under 
arms)  "  Industria  vivimus." 

[Bogus,  and  nearly  as  bad  as  the  old  arms  of  Southend.] 

LEVANT,  OR  TURKEY  MERCHANTS,  COMPANY.  (Incorporated  by 
Queen  Elizabeth,  1579.)  Azure,  on  a  sea  in  base  proper,  a  ship  with  three  masts 
in  full  sail  or,  between  two  rocks  of  the  second,  all  the  sails,  pennants,  and  en- 
signs argent,  each  charged  with  a  cross  gules,  a  chief  engrailed  of  the  third,  in 
base  a  seahorse  proper.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  demi  seahorse 
saliant.  Supporters — Two  seahorses.  Motto — "  Deo  reip  et  amicis." 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

LEVEN  (Fifeshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  upon  the  seal  are  argent, 
a  saltire  sable  between  a  galley  in  chief,  and  in  base  a  representation  of  the  old 
Market  Cross. 

[Of  no  authority.] 


436 


RP€RseveR©j 


LEITH 


LEMBERG 


LEOMINSTER 


LERWICK 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LEWES  (Sussex).     Chequy  argent  and  azure,  on   a  sinister  canton  of  the   first, 
a  lion  rampant  of  the  second,  between  eight  cross  crosslets  sable. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

LEWISHAM,  Borough  of  (London).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

LEYDEN  (Holland).     Argent,  two  keys  in  saltire  wards  outwards  in  chief  gules. 

LEYS  SCHOOL  (Cambridge),  The  Governing  Body  of.  Or,  a  cross  gules, 
charged  in  the  centre  with  a  mullet  of  the  field,  on  a  chief  ermine,  an  open 
book  argent,  embellished  of  the  first,  between  two  roses  of  the  second,  barbed 
and  seeded  proper.  Crest — A  wyvern  proper  resting  the  dexter  claw  on  an 
antique  lamp  or,  flaming  gules.  Motto — "  In  fide  fiducia." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  31st  March  1914.] 

LIBERIA.     A  landscape. 

LICHFIELD   (Staffordshire).      Or,  a  cross  quarter-pierced  ermine,  between    five 
chevrons  gules. 

[Recorded  in  tiie  College  of  Arms.] 


438 


* 

*" 

V, 

J 

^ 

k 

/ 

u 

w 

LEWES 


LEYDEN 


T...T 
'V'X 


V  T 


LICHFIELD 


LEYS  SCHOOL 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LICHFIELD,  See  of.  Per  pale  gules  and  argent,  a  cross  potent  quadrate  in  the 
centre  per  pale  of  the  last  and  or,  between  four  crosses  pattee,  those  on  the  dexter 
argent,  those  on  the  sinister  or. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Anns.] 

The  foregoing  are  the  correct  arms  of  the  see,  but  they  are  generally  quoted 
and  used  as  per  pale  gules  and  argent,  a  cross  potent  quadrate  in  the  centre 
between  four  crosses  pattee  all  coiinterchanged. 

LICHFIELD,  Dean  of     The  arms  of  the  see  with  tlie  letter  D  upon  the  cross. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

LIDD.     See  Lydd. 

LIECHTENSTEIN.  Quarterly:  i  or,  an  eagle  displayed  sable,  armed  and 
crowned  of  the  field,  charged  on  the  breast  and  wings  with  a  prolonged 
crescent  argent ;  2,  barry  of  ten  sable  and  or,  a  crown  of  rue  in  bend  vert ;  3,  per 
pale  gules  and  argent;  4,  argent,  a  jung-frauen-adler  displayed  sable,  the  face 
proper,  crowned  or ;  5  ('n  point),  azure,  a  bugle-horn  stringed  or,  over  all  an 
inescocheon  per  fesse  or  and  gules. 

LIEGE  (Belgium).  Gules,  a  column  upon  degrees  supported  on  the  backs  of  three 
lions  ill  perspective  and  between  the  letters  "  L  "  and  "  G"  in  fesse,  all  or. 


440 


LICHFIELD,  DEAN  OF 


LICHFIELD,  SEE  OF 


LIEGE 


LIECHTENSTEIN 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LIEGE,  Bishopric  of.  Quarterly :  .j  gules,  a  column  on  four  degrees  {i.e.  steps) 
argent,  ducally  crowned  or  (Liege),  2  gules,  a  fesse  argent  (Bouillon),  3  argent, 
three  lions  rampant  vert  (Franchimont),  4  or,  four  bars  gules  (Looz). 

LIEUTENANT,  LORDS-.     Refer  to  Lords-Lieutenant. 

LIFE  ASSURANCE  COMPANIES.  Refer  to  Metropolitan  Assurance  Society 
Pearl  Life  Assurance  Company,  and  Prudential  Assurance  Company. 

LIGHTERMEN'S  COMPANY.     Refer  to  Watermen  and  Lightermen. 

LILLE  (FRANCE).     Gules,  a  fleur-de-lis  or. 

LIMERICK,  City  of  (Co.  Limerick).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in 
Ulster's  Office.  Burke,  however,  in  his  "  General  Armory,"  quotes  the 
following: — "Quarterly  ist  and  4th  gu.  a  castle,  on  each  tower  an  obtuse  spire 
with  a  weathercock,  on  an  arch  over  the  curtain  wall  a  cross  flory  ar. ;  2nd  and 
3rd  gu.  three  lions  of  England  or."  The  Town-Clerk  writes  that  the  arms 
of  the  city  are  correctly  blazoned  as  the  foregoing ;  but  both  the  seals  of  the 
city  show  simply  a  castle  upon  the  escutcheon,  which  does  not  answer  the 
above  description.  It  would  be  well  if  some  one  would  get  the  arms  recorded 
and  confirmed  in  Ulster's  Office  to  establish  an  accepted  coat.  Motto — "  Urbs 
antiqua  fuit  studiisque  asperrima  belli." 

LIMERICK,  See  of.  Azure,  in  the  dexter  chief  a  crozier,  in  the  sinister  a  mitre 
labelled,  and  in  base  two  keys  indorsed  saltirewise,  all  or. 

[This  coat,  which  is  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office,  remains  in  use,  but  through 
the  disestablishment  of  the  Irish  Church  it  is  really  extinct  and  its  present  use  is 
illegal.] 

LIMERICK,  ARDFERT,AND  AGHADOE,  Bishop  of.  According  to  Crock- 
ford  only  the  arms  of  Limerick  are  made  use  of 

LINACRE.     See  Bootle-cum-Linacre. 


442 


LILLE 


LIEGE,  BISHOPRIC  OF 


LIMERICK 


LIMERICK,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LINCOLNSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  arms  of  the  city  of  Lincohi 
are  usually  used. 

LINCOLN,  City  of  (Lincolnshire).     Argent,  on  a  cross  gules,  a  fleur-de-lis  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

LINCOLN,  See  of.  Gules,  two  lions  passant  guardant  or,  on  a  chief  azure  the 
Holy  Virgin  ducally  crowned  seated  on  a  throne  issuant  from  the  chief,  on  her 
dexter  arm  the  infant  Jesus  and  bearing  in  her  sinister  hand  a  sceptre  all  of 
the  second. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

These  arms  first  appear  on  the  seal  of  William  Smith  (1495- 15 14). 

LINCOLN,  Dean  of.     The  arms  of  the  see  and  in  chief  the  letter  D  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

LINCOLN  COLLEGE  (Co.  Oxford).  (Founded  1429,  by  Hugh  Fleming,  then 
Bishop  of  Lincoln.)  The  escutcheon  divided  paleways  into  three  parts,  the 
centre  argent,  thereon  the  arms  of  the  see  of  Lincoln,  ensigned  with  a  mitre, 
all  proper,  on  the  dexter  side  the  arms  of  Richard  Fleming,  Bishop  of  Lincoln, 
viz. :  barry  of  six  argent  and  azure  in  chief  three  lozenges  gules,  in  the  fesse 
point  a  mullet  pierced  sable,  the  sinister  side  vert  three  stags  statant,  two  and 
one  or  :  being  the  arms  of  Thomas  Scott,  otherwise  Rotherham,  who  first  was 
Bishop  of  Rochester,  afterwards  Bishop  of  Lincoln,  then  Archbishop  of  York,  and 
Chancellor  of  England,  Privy  Seal  to  Edward  IV.,  and  at  length  a  Cardinal. 
He  finished  the  college,  and  in  1479  refounded  and  liberally  endowed  it. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms,  at  the  Visitation  of  the  County  of  Oxford, 
1574.     As  to  the  division  of  the  shield,  refer  to  the  note  sub  Brazenose  College.] 


444 


LINCOLN,  CITY  OF 


LINCOLN,  SEE  OF 


^0^ 


LINCOLN,  DEAN  OF 


LINCOLN  COLLEGE  (CO.  OXFORD) 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LINCOLN'S  INN,  The  Honourable  Society  of.  Azure,  seme  of  mill-rinds  or,  on 
a  canton  of  the  second,  a  lion  rampant  purpiire. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

Prior  to  1703  the  Society  used  the  arms  of  Henry  de  Lacy,  Earl  of  Lincoln, 
though  as  early  as  1615  Sir  George  Buck  wrote:  "But  Sir  James  Lea  [Ley] 
told  me  there  was  lately  a  coat  devised  for  this  house  viz.  Azure,  seme  de  fers 
de  mouline  or  with  a  purple  Lyon  in  a  canton  or"  (Stow,  "  Annales,"  p.  974). 

LINEN  MANUFACTURERS  IN  SCOTLAND,  The  Company  of  Azure, 
the  cross  of  St  Andrew  argent,  on  a  chief  of  the  second  a  cross  of  St  George 
gules.  Crest — Two  hands  conjoined  surrounded  with  a  hesp  of  yairn  twisted  and 
disposed  in  circle  proper.  Su/>po)-ted  by  a  spinning  woman  with  a  distafif  on  the 
dexter,  and  on  the  sinister  by  a  man  weaver  laying  his  hand  on  the  shuttle. 
Alot/o —"  QoncoY(S\a.  crescunt. 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  15th  December  1694.] 

LINLITHGOWSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  County 
Council  simply  exhibits  the  Royal  Arms  of  Scotland  within  the  collar  of  the 
Thistle,  and  surmounted  by  the  Royal  Crown. 

LINLITHGOW  (Linlithgowshire).  The  entry  in  Lyon  Register  is  as  follows: — 
The  Royall  Burgh  of  Linlithgow  gives  for  Ensignes  Armoriall,  Azur,  the  figur 
of  the  Arch-Angell  Michaell,  with  winges  expanded  Tredding  on  ye  bellie  of  a 
Serpent  lying  with  its  taill  nowed  fess-ways  in  base  all  argent,  the  head  of  which 
he  is  pearceing  through  with  a  Spear  in  his  dexter  hand,  and  grasping  with  his 
sinister  ane  Inescutcheon  charged  with  the  Royall  Armes  of  Scotland.  The 
Motto  being  "  Collocet  in  Ccelis  nos  omnes  vis  Michailis."  The  reverse  is.  Or,  a 
greyhound  bitch  sable  chained  to  an  oak-tree  within  a  lock  proper. 

LINNEAN  SOCIETY  (London).  Per  fesse  the  chief  per  pale  gules  and  vert,  the 
base  sable,  on  a  fesse  argent,  a  hurt  charged  with  an  egg  erect  proper.  Crest — 
On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  behind  a  mount  on  which  vegetates  the  linntea- 
borealis,  the  sun  rising  in  splendour,  all  proper.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  lion  or, 
gorged  with  the  linnaea-borealis  proper,  therefrom  a  shield  pendent  per  pale 
wavy  argent  and  ermine,  charged  with  a  rose  slipped  gules  and  a  thistle  fesse- 
ways  proper  ;  (sinister)  an  eagle  rising  proper,  gorged  as  he  dexter,  therefrom  a 
shield  pendent  argent  charged  with  a  trefoil  slipped  vert.  Motto—''  Naturse 
discere  mores." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  1802.     Gts.  xxii.  40.] 


446 


LINCOLN'S   INN 


LINLITHGOW 


LINNEAN  SOCIETY 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LINZ  (Austria).  Gules,  in  base  water,  therein  two  fish  or,  and  issuing  therefrom 
a  terrace  vert,  thereon  a  castellated  gateway  and  in  the  centre  chief  point  an 
inescocheon  of  the  field  charged  with  a  fesse  argent, 

LION'S  INN  (London).     Chequy  or  and  argent,  over  all  a  lion  in  bend  salient  sable. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

LIPPE,  Principality  of.  Argent,  a  rose  gules.  The  Princes  of  Lippe  use  the  arms, 
quarterings,  crests,  and  supporters  as  in  the  illustration. 

LISBON  (Portugal).  Argent,  on  waves  of  the  sea  in  base,  a  three-masted  ship, 
sails  furled.     Motto — "  Mui  nobre  leal  cidade  de  Lisboa." 


448 


LINZ 


LISBON 


LIPPE 


LIPPE 


2  r 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LISKEARD  (Cornwall).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  a 
fleur-de-lis,  and  perched  thereupon,  respecting  each  other,  are  two  birds 
(Burke  gives  "beds,"  a  palpable  printer's  blunder),  in  chief  two  annulets,  and 
in  the  flanks  two  feathers.  The  legend  is  differently  quoted,  and  I  have  been 
unable  to  obtain  an  actual  impression  of  the  seal. 

LISMORE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in  Ulster's  Office,  but  the 
following  are  attributed  to  the  town  : — Argent,  an  abbey  (?)  of  two  spires,  and 
in  chief  a  dove  holding  in  its  beak  an  olive  branch,  within  a  glory  and  descending 
from  clouds  all  proper.  In  the  gateway  is  an  escutcheon  of  the  arms  of  the 
Right  Honourable  the  Earl  of  Shannon,  namely.  Party  per  bend  embattled 
argent  and  gules  in  chief  a  crescent  of  the  last  for  difference,  surmounted  by 
an  earl's  coronet.     Motto — "  God's  providence  is  our  inheritance." 

LISMORE.      Refer  to  Cashel  and  Emly,  Waterford  and  Lismore,  Bishop  of 

LITERARY  FUND.      Refer  to  Royal  Literary  Fund. 

LITHUANIA.     Refer  to  Poland,  Kings  of 

LIVERPOOL  (Lancashire).  Argent,  a  cormorant,  in  the  beak  a  branch  of  sea- 
weed called  Laver,  all  proper;  and  for  the  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours 
a  cormorant,  the  wings  elevated,  in  the  beak  a  branch  of  laver  proper.  Supporters 
— The  dexter,  Neptune,  with  his  sea-green  mantle  flowing,  the  waist  wreathed 
with  laver,  on  his  head  an  Eastern  crown  gold,  in  the  right  hand  his  trident 
sable,  the  left  supporting  a  banner  of  the  arms  of  Liverpool  ;  on  the  sinister, 
a  Triton  wreathed  as  the  dexter  and  blowing  his  shell,  the  right  hand  supporting 
a  banner,  thereon  a  ship  under  a  sail  in  perspective  all  proper,  the  banner  staves 
or.     Motto — "  Deus  nobis  ha-c  otia  fecit." 

The  arms  and  crest  were  granted  by  Sir  Isaac  Heard,  Knight,  Garter 
Principal  King  of  Arms,  and  George  Harrison,  Norroy  King  of  Arms,  March 
22nd,  and  the  supporters  by  Sir  Isaac  Heard,  Knight,  Garter  Principal  King 
of  Arms,  March  23rd,  in  the  year  1797. 

[Grant  printed  "  Hist.  Soc.  L.  and  C,"  xlii.  g.] 

LIVERPOOL,  See  of.  Argent,  an  eagle  rising  sable,  beaked,  legged  and  a  glory 
round  the  head  or,  holding  in  the  dexter  claw  an  ancient  inkhorn  proper,  a  chief 
per  pale  azure  and  gules,  charged  on  the  dexter  side  with  an  open  book  or, 
inscribed  in  letters  sable.  "  Thy  word  is  truth,"  and  on  the  sinister  an  ancient 
ship  with  three  masts,  sails  furled  also  or. 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms  17th  July  18S2.  Grant  printed  "Hist.  Soc. 
L.  and  C,"  xlii.  9  ] 

The  eagle  holding  the  penner  is  the  badge  of  St  John  the  Evangelist,  and 
appears  on  the  ancient  seal  of  the  borough  (not  a  liver). 

LIVERPOOL,  University  of     Refer  to  University  of  Liverpool. 

4.S0 


LISMORE 


LIVERPOOL,  SEE  OF 


LIVERPOOL 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LIVERPOOL  COLLEGE.     Per  fesse  azure  and  gules,  in  chief  the  Imperial  crown 
upon  a  cushion  and  in  front  of  a  crosier  and  sceptre  in  saltire  and  in  the  base  an 
open  book,  all  proper.     Alotto — "  Non  solum  ingenii  verum  etiam  virtutis." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

LIVORNO  (Italy).  Gules,  issuant  from  water  in  base  proper,  a  tower  argent,  and 
from  the  battlement  two  turrets,  on  the  dexter  a  flagstaff  and  flying  therefrom 
to  the  sinister  a  forked  pennon  charged  with  the  word  "  Fides." 

LLANDAFF  (Glamorganshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  but  Burke,  in  his 
"  General  Armory,"  quotes,  "  Sa.,  two  crosiers  in  saltire  or,  on  a  chief  azure  three 
mitres  of  the  second."  These,  of  course,  are  the  arms  of  the  See,  with  the 
exception  that  the  sinister  crozier  should  be  argent. 

LLANDAFF,  See  of.  Sable  two  crosiers  in  saltire  or  and  argent,  on  a  chief  azure 
three  mitres  labelled  of  the  second. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

LLANDAFF  PRIORY  (Glamorganshire).  The  same  arms  as  now  used  for  the 
See  of  Llandaff. 

LLANDOVERY  (Carmarthenshire).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

LLANELLY  (Co.  Carmarthen).  Per  chevron  argent  and  gules,  in  chief  two 
lymphads  sable,  and  in  base  a  figure  representing  St  Elli  of  the  first.  Crest — 
Issuant  from  a  mural  crown  proper,  two  dragons'  wings  gules,  each  charged  with 
a  fesse  chequy  or  and  azure.  Motto — "Ymlaen  Llanelli."  Badge — In  front  of 
two  miners'  pick-axes  in  saltire  and  within  a  Stepne}'  motor  wheel,  a  wooden 
box  containing  a  sheet  of  tin-plate  all  proper. 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  1913.] 

LLANFYLLIN  (Montgomeryshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  and,  failing  their 
possession,  the  corporation  seal  exhibits,  with  the  legend,  "  Borough  of  Llanfyllin," 
the  Royal  arms,  crown,  supporters,  garter,  and  motto,  the  arms  being 
Quarterly  i  and  4  France  and  England  quarterly,  2  Scotland,  3  Ireland. 

LLANIDLOES  (Montgomeryshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal 
represents  on  a  mount  a  ram  passant  within  the  legend,  "  Burgh  of  Llanidloes." 

LOANHEAD.      Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 

LOCHGELLY.  Has  no  arms,  and  its  seal  is  a  picturesque  representation  of  a  pit- 
head and  railway  siding.  In  the  base  of  the  seal,  however,  appears  something 
in  the  nature  of  a  coat-of-arms,  viz..  Quarterly,  i,  azure,  three  lumps  of  coal  ;  2 
argent,  a  beehive  ;  3,  argent,  a  pickaxe  ;  4,  azure,  a  miner's  safety-lamp.  Motto — 
"  By  industry  we  flourish." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

452 


LIVERPOOL  COLLEGE 


LLANDAFF,   SEE  OF 


LLANELLY 
(Badge) 


LLANELLY 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LOCHGILPHEAD  (Argyllshire).  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  represents  an  anchor 
cabled,  the  stock  crossed  by  a  herring.     Motto — "  Dochas." 

LOCHMABEN  (Dumfriesshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings. 
The  seal  represents  the  figure  of  St  Magdalene  holding  a  chalice,  with  the 
legend,  "S.  commune  villae  et  burgi  de  Lochmaben." 

LOCKERBIE  (Dumfriesshire.)  Has  no  arms  of  its  own,  but  finds  those  of  the 
Johnstone-Douglas  family  answer  all  purposes.  They  are,  Quarterly :  i  and  4, 
argent,  a  heart  imperially  crowned,  all  proper  ;  on  a  chief  azure,  three  mullets  of 
the  field  ;  2,  argent,  a  saltire  sable,  on  a  chief  gules  three  cushions  or  ;  3,  azure, 
a  bend  between  six  cross  crosslets  fichee  or. 

LODOMIRIA.     Azure,  two  bars  chequy  gules  and  argent. 

LOE.     See  East  Looe  and  West  Looe. 

LOGIC  SCHOOL  (Cambridge).  Refer  to  Divinity  School  and  Cambridge  Uni- 
versity, Regius  Professors. 


454 


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LOCKERBIE 


THE   BOOK   OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

LONDON  (City  of).  Argent,  a  cross  gules,  in  the  first  quarter,  a  sword  in  pale, 
point  upwards,  of  the  last.  Crest — A  dragon's  sinister  wing  argent,  charged 
with  a  cross  gules.  Stipporters — On  either  side,  a  dragon  with  wings  elevated 
and  endorsed  argent,  and  charged  on  the  wing  with  a  cross  gules.  Motto — 
"  Domine  dirige  nos." 

Strange  indeed  as  it  may  seem,  the  crest  and  supporters  used  by  the 
City  of  London,  the  first  city  in  the  world,  are  not  recorded  in  His  Majesty's 
College  of  Arms,  and  are  of  no  authority.  As  Vincent  only  gives  the  coat-of- 
arms,  it  proves  pretty  conclusively  that  the  crest  and  supporters  are  modern. 
The  arms  date  back  to  1359,  the  crest  to  1539,  the  supporters  and  motto  to 
1633,  when  they  first  appear  in  the  4th  Edition  of  Stow's  "Survey  of  London." 

[Within  a  few  days  of  publication  a  MS.,  dated  1609,  has  come  into  the 
possession  of  the  Corporation,  which  shows  these  supporters  presumably  in  use 
at  that  date.] 

The  legend,  imaginative  and  chimerical  as  a  statement  from  such  a  quarter 
usually  proves  to  be,  as  to  "  Wat  Tyler's  dagger "  appearing  on  the  arms  of 
the  City  of  London,  is,  of  course,  a  pure  piece  of  fiction.  The  "dagger"  in 
question  is  not  a  dagger  at  all,  but  a  sword,  as  may  be  plainly  seen  by  a 
reference  to  Vincent's  original  drawing  in  the  College  of  Arms,  which  is  there 
so  clearly  sketched  that  there  is  no  "possible  probable  shadow  of  doubt,  no 
possible  doubt  whatever."  The  sword  is,  of  course,  a  badge  of  the  patron  saint 
of  London,  St  Paul.  The  arms  with  the  sword  appear  upon  the  Seal  which  was 
taken  into  use  17th  April  1381,  before  the  death  of  Wat  Tyler,  15th  June 
following. 

Asto  the  supporters,  usage  seems  pretty  constant,  the  only  variation  beingthat 
the  cross  is  sometimes  "  couped  "  instead  of  "  throughout."  And  the  same  may 
be  said  of  the  cross  upon  the  crest,  but  the  "couped  "  variety  is  not  common, 
and  I  have  never  seen  it  upon  anything  official.  A  misprint  in  Burke's  "  General 
Armory  "  has  frequently  caused  some  little  confusion  as  to  the  crest  amongst 
those  unacquainted  with  the  form  in  use.  The  Mayor's  seal  shows  two  lions 
sejant  guardant  as  supporters. 

Another  variation  which  I  have  seen  frequently  perpetrated  is  the  making 
of  the  crest  into  "  a  pair  of  wings  addorsed."  The  Corporation  gas  pillars  are 
the  worst  offenders  on  this  point.  The  helmet  in  use  over  the  arms  of  the 
City  of  London  is  that  of  a  peer.  Such  a  practice  with  town  or  city  arms  is 
officially  admitted  nowhere  at  the  present  day,  though  I  have  seen  it  done  else- 
where. But  the  remarkable  point  is  this,  that  with  the  arms  of  London  this 
usage  is  practically  universal.  No  helmet  appears  above  Vincent's  sketch  in  the ' 
College  of  Arms;  but  is  there  any  valid  reason  for  the  invariable  practice,  which 
appears  to  hold  good  ?  The  "  Right  Honourable  "  was  until  of  recent  years  a 
title  strictly  appertaining  amongst  Mayors  to  the  Lord  Mayor  of  the  City  of 
London.  Moreover,  he  is  always  addressed,  of  course,  as  "  My  Lord,"  both  of 
which  are  amongst  the  privileges  of  peers.  Is  it  for  this  reason  that  a  peer's 
helmet  has  been  appropriated  to  the  arms  of  the  City  of  London  ?  Very  often 
the  arms  are  surmounted  by  a  representation  of  the  fur  cap  of  office,  after  the 

456 


LONDON,   CITY  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

manner  of  a  coronet.  This,  as  a  decorative  addition  to  the  arms,  first  appears 
in  the  "Armory  of  London  "  in  1677,  but  it  is  only  placed  above  the  arms  in 
.  i6go.  There  is  no  authority  for  its  use.  Norwich  makes  use  of  a  similar 
ornament  upon  its  Corporation  notepaper,  though  probably  even  with  less  reason 
than  the  City  of  London.  Since  the  publication  of  the  first  Edition  a  Committee 
of  the  Corporation  was  appointed  to  consider  the  question  of  the  City  Arms. 
It  presented  a  most  valuable  report  which  has  since  been  printed,  and  which 
admits  what  I  had  pointed  out,  that  there  is  no  authority  for  the  crest  and 
supporters:  but  the'dear  old  Corporation  couldn't  screw  its  courage  up  sufficiently 
to  take  steps  to  legitimise  its  bogus  insignia.  As  the  Corporation  desires  to 
perpetuate  a  certain  form  it  is  here  reproduced.  They  call  it  the  "  Correct  Coat 
of  Arms,"  I  call  it  the  "  bogus  "  one. 

LONDON  COUNTY  COUNCIL.  Barry  wavy  of  six  azure  and  argent,  on  a 
chief  of  the  last,  the  cross  of  St  George,  charged  with  a  lion  of  England  :  the 
shield  ensigned  with  a  mural  crown  gold. 

[Granted  by  H.M.'s  Royal  Warrant,  29th  July  1914,  and  exemplified  in  the 
College  of  Arms.] 


458 


THE  LONDON  COUNTY  COUNCIL 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LONDON  INSTITUTION.  Per  fesse  azure  and  argent,  in  chief  beneath  the  sun 
in  splendour  a  terrestrial  globe  between  an  open  book  on  the  dexter  and  an  air- 
pump  on  the  sinister,  all  proper,  and  in  base  the  cross  and  sword  of  the  arms  of 
the  city  of  London.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  lion  passant  guardant 
or,  the  dexter  paw  holding  the  charter  of  the  said  Institution  proper.  Supporters 
— (De.xter)  a  female  figure  representing  the  city  of  London,  habited  argent,  zoned 
azure,  and  over  her  shoulders  a  mantle  gules,  fringed  or,  on  her  head  a  mural 
crown  proper,  her  exterior  hand  resting  on  a  shield  erect,  thereon  the  arms  of  the 
said  City  of  London  ;  (sinister)  a  female  figure  representing  Minerva  in  a  robe 
argent,  tunic  purpure,  zone,  gorget,  and  helmet  or,  in  her  dexter  hand  a  spear 
erect  proper,  her  sinister  hand  resting  on  the  ^gis  azure,  charged  with  Medusa's 
head,  gold.  Motto — "  Studio  fallente  laborem." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  1807.] 

LONDON,  See  of.     Gules,  two  swords  in  saltire,  points  upwards,  argent  hilts  and 
pommels  or. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

Arms  first  used  on  seal  of  Bishop  Ralph  Stratford  in  1348. 

LONDON,  Dean  of     The  arms  of  the  See,  and  in  chief  the  letter  D  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 


460 


LONDON  INSTITUTION 


LONDON,  DEAN  OF 


LONDON,   SEE  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LONDON,  The  Guild  of  Freemen  of  the  City  of.      Argent,  on  a  cross  gules 
enfiled  in  chief  and  base  by  two  mural  crowns  or,  a  rose  of  the  first,  slipped 
and  leaved  proper.     Crest — A  mural  crown  or,  rising  therefrom  a  dove,  wings 
expanded  proper.     Motto — "  Londini  defendi  tuos  deus  optime  cives." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  31st  May  191 2.] 

LONDON.     Refer  to  Port  of  London  Authority  and  to  the  "  Newe  Corporation  of 
Freemen  in  the  suburbs  about  London." 

LONDON    LIVERY    COMPANIES   AND    TRADING    CORPORATIONS. 

Refer  to  the  several  Companies. 

LONDON,  University  of.     See  University  of  London. 
LONDONDERRY,  County.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 


463 


LONDON,  GUILD  OF  FREEMEN   OF  THE  CITY  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LONDONDERRY  (Co.  Londonderry).  Sable,  on  a  stone  vert,  a  skeleton  of 
human  bones  sitting,  leaning  the  dexter  elbow  upon  the  knee,  and  resting  the 
head  on  the  hand,  the  sinister  hand  resting  on  the  hip  all  or,  in  the  dexter  chief 
a  castle  argent,  a  chief  of  the  arms  of  the  City  of  London.  Motto — "  Vita  Veritas 
victoria." 

"The  Arms  of  ye  Cittie  of  Derrie  where  at  first  when  the  Ho'''''  S'  Henry 
Docwra  fought,  made  the  plantation  thereof  against  the  arch  traytowre  Hugh 
sometime  Earle  of  Tyrone.  The  picture  of  death  (or  a  skeleton)  sitting  on  a 
mossie  ston  and  in  the  dexter  point  a  Castle,  And  forasmuch  as  that  Cittie  was 
since  most  trayterouslie  sacked  and  destroyed  by  S'  Cahire  (or  S'  Charles) 
ODogharty,  and  hath  since  bene  (as  it  were)  raysed  from  the  dead  by  the  worthy 
undertakinge  of  the  Ho*"'"  Cittie  of  London,  in  memorie  where  of  it  is  from  hence- 
forth called  and  known  by  the  name  of  London  Derrie.  I  have  at  the  request  of 
John  Rowley  now  first  Mayor  of  that  Cittie  and  Commaltie  of  the  same  set 
forth  the  same  Armes  w"'  an  addition  of  a  Chief  the  Armes  of  London  as  heere 
appeareth  and  for  confirmation  thereof  have  heereunto  set  my  hand  and  seale 
the  first  of  June  1623.     (Signed  in  pencil)  DAN  MOLYNEUX." 

The  only  authority  remaining  in  Ulster's  Office  is  a  very  rough  sketch  "in 
trick  "  with  the  note  as  set  forth  here  above,  bound  up  with  other  papers  in  a 
book  of  "  Draft  Grants,"  and  for  want  of  any  other  I  take  this  as  my  authority, 
though  I  am  aware  that  it  differs  considerably  from  the  arms  as  quoted  by 
Burke  in  his  "  General  Armory  "  and  from  the  form  in  use.  Why  an  Irish  harp 
is  almost  invariably  charged  upon  the  cross  in  the  chief,  I  am  at  a  loss  to 
understand. — Ed. 

The  arms  as  they  appear  upon  the  Town  Clerk's  note-paper  are  in  form 
very  similar  to  the  illustration  herein,  but  are  surrounded  by  a  trophy  of 
military  flags  and  weapons,  and  are  surmounted  by  a  crest,  namely,  "an  Irish 
harp  surmounted  by  a  royal  crown,"  and  further  the  field  is  shown  to  be  azure. 
The  whole  design,  so  the  Town-Clerk  writes,  is  "exactly  the  same  as  worked 
by  the  French  prisoners  on  the  tapestry  in  the  Bank  of  Ireland,  the  Old  House 
of  Lords,  about  the  year  17 10," though  he  further  adds  that  "the  upper  part  is 
argent  and  gules,  and  the  lower  half  proper."  Debrett's  "  House  of  Commons  " 
makes  the  arms  "  per  fess,"  the  field  "  azure,"  charges  the  cross  with  an  "  Irish 
harp,"  and  puts  the  sword  in  the  arms  of  the  City  of  London  in  the  "  second  " 
quarter. 

LONDONDERRY,  PORT  AND  HARBOUR  COMMISSIONERS.  Or,  on  a 
cross  gules,  a  tower  proper,  on  a  chief  argent,  the  representation  of  the  entrance 
to  the  harbour  and  a  ship  with  three  masts  sailing  in,  all  also  proper  Crest — On 
a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  lighthouse  standing  on  a  rock  proper.  Supporters — 
Two  dragons  with  wings  expanded  proper,  each  charged  on  the  shoulder  with  a 
tower,  also  proper.     Motto — "  In  Portu  quies." 

[Granted  by  Sir  Bernard  Burke,  Ulster  King  of  Arms,  February  9,  1858.] 


464 


LONDONDERRY 


LONDONDERRY,  PORT  AND  HARBOUR  COMMISSIONERS 


id 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
LONGFORD,  County.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

LONGFORD,  Town.  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in  Ulster's  Office,  but 
those  in  use  are  "  Quarterly  i  and  4  ermine,  a  griffin  segreant  azure,  2  and  3 
gules,  a  boar  passant  argent."     Motto — "  Scio  cui  confideo." 

LONG    BOW-STRING  MAKERS'  COMPANY  (London).     Azure,  a    hank  or 
knot  of  bow-string  in  pale  or,  on  a  chief  argent,  three    bows.      Crest — On    a 
wreath,    a    man   vested   proper,  shooting  with  a  bow  and    arrow    of  tlie    last. 
Motto — "  Nee  habeo  nee  careo  nee  euro." 
[These  arms  are  of  no  authority.] 

LONGTON  (Staffordshire).  Had  no  armorial  bearings.  The  borough,  however, 
assumed  the  escutcheon,  the  quarterings,  and  the  impalement  of  the  late 
John  Edensor  Heathcote,  Esquire,  J. P.,  of  Longton  Hall,  who  died  1869. 
Somebody  else's  crest  (.'  that  of  the  Mosley  family)  was  appropriated,  and 
supporters  invented.  The  arms  were  per  pale,  the  dexter  side  quarterly  i  and  4 
ermine,  three  pomeis  vert,  each  charged  with  a  cross  or  (being  the  arms  of 
Heathcote) ;  2  argent,  a  chevron  between  three  horse-shoes  sable  (being  the 
arms  of  Edensor) ;  3  vairee  ermine  and  gules  (being  the  arms  of  Gresley — on 
the  seal  a  "canton,"  and  on  the  note-paper  a  "chief,"  chequy  were  added  to  this 
quarter);  the  sinister  side  quarterly  i  and  4  quarterly,  per  fesse  indented  ermine 
and  azure,  2  and  3  party  per  chevron  sable  and  ermine,  in  chief,  two  boars' 
heads  couped  or,  being  the  arms  of  Sandford.  C7-est — An  eagle  displayed  ermine 
(or?  charged  on  the  breast  with  three  ermine  spots).  Supporters — On  the 
dexter  side,  a  potter  habited  and  with  an  apron,  holding  in  his  exterior  hand  a 
or  jug  vase,  and  on  the  sinister  side  a  miner  habited  below  the  waist  (naked 
or  clothed  above  the  waist  apparently  according  to  fancy),  holding  over  his 
sinister  shoulder  a  pickaxe,  presumably  all  proper.  Motto — "Great  industria  " 
(Was  this  intended  for  "Great,"  and  simply  an  engraver's  error?).  Longton 
is  now  included  in  the  Amalgamated  Borough  of  Stoke-upon-Trent,  to  which 
refer. 

LOOZ.     Refer  to  Liege,  Bishopric  of. 

LORD  CHAMBERLAIN  OF  THE  HOUSEHOLD  IN  ENGLAND.  Badge 
of  Office — A  golden  key  in  pale  behind  his  shield. 

LORD  CHANCELLOR  OF  ENGLAND.  Badge  of  Office— Tv^'o  maces  in 
saltire  behind  his  shield  and  the  purse  containing  the  great  seal  below  it. 

LORD  GREAT  CHAMBERLAIN  OF  ENGLAND.  Badge  of  Office— Tv/o 
golden  keys  in  saltire  behind  his  arms. 

LORD  HIGH  CHAMBERLAIN  OF  SCOTLAND.  Badge  oj  Office— Tvio 
golden  keys  in  saltire  behind  his  arms. 

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THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LORD  HIGH  CONSTABLE  OF  ENGLAND.  Badge  of  Office— ^e\\\nd  the 
shield  in  saltire  two  batons  similar  to  the  one  which  is  delivered  to  him  for  use 
at  the  Coronation. 

LORD  HIGH  CONSTABLE  OF  SCOTLAND.  Badge  of  Office— Two  silver 
batons  tipped  with  gold  at  either  end  in  saltire  behind  his  arms. 

LORD  JUSTICE-GENERAL  OF  SCOTLAND.      Badge  of  Office—''  Behind  the 
shield  two  swords  in  saltire,  points  upwards  proper  as  the  insignia  of  his  office." 
The  arms  of  several  who  have  held  the  above  office  of  Lord  Justice-General 
have  been  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register  with  the  above  additions. 

LORD-LIEUTENANT  OF  IRELAND.  The  flag  of  the  Viceroy  of  Ireland  is 
the  Union  flag  charged  on  the  centre  with  a  harp  or  upon  a  blue  inescutcheon. 

LORDS-LIEUTENANT  OF  COUNTIES.  His  Majesty,  April  27,  191 1, 
approved  of  a  flag  to  be  used  by  Lords-Lieutenant,  viz.,  the  Union  flag  charged 
on  the  cross  of  St  George  with  a  sword  fesseways,  point  to  the  sinister,  sur- 
mounted by  an  Imperial  Crown  proper. 

LORINERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  3rd  December 
171 1.)  Azure,  on  a  chevron  argent,  between  three  manage  bits  or,  as  many 
bosses  sable. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

LORNE,  Lordship  of.  Argent,  a  galley  (or  lymphad)  sable,  sails  furled,  flag  and 
pennants  flying  and  oars  in  action  proper. 

[This  coat,  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  is  borne  for  the  Lordship  of 
Lome  by  the  Dukes  of  Argyll  quarterly  (in  the  second  and  third  quarters)  with 
the  arms  of  Campbell.] 

LORRAINE.     Refer  to  Austria. 

LOSSIEMOUTH  AND  BRANDERBURGH.  Has  no  arms.  Its  seal,  which  is  not 
heraldic,  represents  a  Bishop,  St  Gerardine,  bearing  in  his  sinister  hand  a  crozier, 
and  holding  out  a  lantern  towards  an  ancient  vessel.     Motto — "  Per  noctem  lux." 

LOSTWITHIEL  (Cornwall).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

LOUGHBOROUGH  (Leicestershire).  Or,  on  a  bend  sable  between  a  maunch  in 
chief  and  a  bull's  head  erased  in  base  of  the  last,  a  fret  between  two  escallops 
of  the  first.  Crest — Upon  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  lion  rampant  or,  holding 
in  the  dexter  fore-paw  a  maunch  and  resting  the  dexter  hind-paw  on  a  fret 
sable.     Motto — "  In  veritate  victoria." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  lOth  April  1889.] 


468 


LORINERS,  COMPANY  OF 


LORNE,  LORDSHIP  OF 


^) 


LOUGHBOROUGH 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LOUTH  (Lincolnshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  As  to  a  seal,  the  Town-Clerk 
returned  the  letter  of  the  editor  asking  for  an  impression  of  the  seal,  with  the 
curt  remark,  "We  have  none,"  superscribed  upon  it.  A  Corporation  without  a 
seal,  one  is  inclined  to  think,  must  be  unique. 

LOUTH  AND  DROGHEDA,  County.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

LOUTH,  Town  of  (Co.  Louth).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

LOUVAIN  (Belgium).     Gules,  a  fesse  argent. 

LOWESTOFT  (Suffolk).  Argent,  on  a  chevron  sable,  between  in  chief  an  antique 
crown  between  two  roses  gules,  each  rose  charged  with  another  rose  argent,  all 
barbed  and  seeded  proper,  and  in  base  a  sun  issuant  or,  three  Lowestoft  china 
plates  also  proper.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  demi-figure  represent- 
ing St  Margaret,  holding  in  the  hand  a  pearl  all  proper.  Motto — "  Point  du 
jour." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  14th  February  1913.] 

LUBECK  (Germany).  Per  fesse  argent  and  gules,  the  shield  displayed  on  the 
breast  of  a  double-headed  eagle  displayed  sable,  beaked  and  legged  gules. 

In  the  great  shield  of  Lubeck,  the  eagle  as  above  described  is  placed  upon 
a  shield  or.  Matitling — Gules  and  argent.  Cirst — Out  of  a  coronet  or,  a  demi- 
eagle  (with  one  head)  displayed  sable,  beaked  gules.  Supporters — Two  lions 
proper. 

LUBECK  (Bishopric  of).  Azure,  a  cross  couped  or,  surmounted  with  a  mitre  of 
the  last. 

LUCCA  (Italy).     Per  fesse  argent  and  gules. 

The  arms  formerly  used  for  the  Republic  of  Lucca,  now  extinct,  were  azure, 
the  word  "  Libertas  "  written  in  capital  letters  in  gold,  and  placed  bendways, 
beginning  in  chief  between  two  bendlets  or. 


470 


LOWESTOFT 


LUBECK 


LUCCA  (ITALY) 


LUBECK  (BISHOPRIC  OF) 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

LUCERN,  Canton  (Switzerland).  Per  pale  argent  and  azure.  Supporter — On 
the  dexter  side  a  savage  ;  hands,  face,  and  feet  proper,  all  the  other  parts 
covered  with  leaves,  girt  ronnd  the  head  and  waist  with  laurel ;  holding  in  his 
dexter  hand  an  oak  branch,  all  proper,  the  sinister  supporting  the  shield. 

LUCKNOW,  See  of.  Or,  three  bendlets  wavy  azure,  over  all  a  tower  and  floating 
from  the  battlements  a  banner  of  St  George  all  proper,  on  a  chief  azure,  three 
celestial  crowns  or. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

LUDLOW   (Shropshire).      Azure,  a  lion  couchant  guardant  between  three  roses, 
argent.     Crest — Upon  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  porcupine  quarterly  or  and  azure. 
Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms. 

The  shield  is  sometimes  surmounted  by  a  plume  of  three  ostrich  feathers, 
but  there  is  no  authority  for  such  a  practice. 

LUGGERSHALL  (Wiltshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Burke's  "General 
Armory"  gives  "  Az.  a  castle  ppr." 

LURGAN  (Co.  Armagh).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  But  in  iS68  the  Town 
Commissioners  did  Lord  Lurgan  the  honour  (.')  of  appropriating  his  arms  and 
quarterings  (with  his  crest)  to  impale  with  a  bogus  concoction  of  their  own  in- 
vention. The  result  is  as  follows: — i  Party  per  pale,  the  dexter  side,  quarterly 
I  and  4,  party  per  pale  or  and  argent  an  inescutcheon  within  an  orle  of  martlets 
sable  (being  the  arms  of  Brownlow).  2  Argent,  a  stag  springing  gules,  on  a 
chief  vert  three  mullets  of  the  first  (being  the  arms  of  O'Dogherty).  3  Gules,  a 
chevron  between  three  escallop-shells  or  (being  the  arms  of  Chamberlain) ;  the 
sinister  side  vert,  on  a  chevron  ermine,  between  a  pile  of  linen  webs  in  chief,  and 
a  beehive  with  bees  in  base  all  proper,  three  bezants.  Crest — On  a  chapeau 
azure,  turned  up  ermine,  a  greyhound  gules,  collared  or,  being  the  crest  of  Lord 
Lurgan.     Motto — "  Be  just  and  fear  not." 


472 


LUCERN 


LUCKNOW,  SEE  OF 


B\A 


LUDLOW 


LURGAN 


THE   BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

LUSATIA,    LOWER,    Markgravate  of.     Argent,  an  ox  passant  proper  {i.e.  red 
with  white  belly  and  black  horns). 

LUSATIA,    UPPER,    Markgravate   of.     Azure,    in    base   a  wall    embattled    or, 
masoned  sable. 

LUTON  (Bedfordshire).  Quarterly  gules  and  azure,  on  a  cross  argent,  between  a 
garb  in  the  first  quarter,  a  beehive  in  the  second,  a  rose  slipped  and  leaved 
in  the  third,  and  a  thistle  also  slipped  and  leaved  in  the  fourth,  all  proper,  a 
bee  volant  of  the  last.  And  for  the  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours  upon 
a  mount  vert,  a  cubit  arm  in  bend,  vested  azure,  cuff  argent,  the  hand  proper, 
holding  seven  ears  of  wheat  or.  Motto — "  Scientize  et  labori  detur." 
Granted,  College  of  Arms,  25th  July  1876. 

LUTESTRINGS,  Patentees  for  the  making  and  dressing  of  Alamodes,  Renforce, 
etc.    Refer  to  Patentees. 

LUXEMBURG  (Germany).     Barry  argent  and  azure,  a  lion  rampant  gules  crowned 
or. 

LUXEMBURG,  Grand  Duchy  of.     Arms  as  above,  and  on  an  inescutcheon  the 
arms  of  the  ruling  dynasty,  viz.,  Nassau.     Supporteys—T^o  lions  or,  crowned. 


474 


LUSATIA,  LOWER 


LUSATIA,  UPPER 


LUXEMBURG 


THE   BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

LYDD  (Kent).  (Azure),  the  base  water  (proper),  thereon  a  castle  with  a  tower,  and 
with  the  spire  thereupon  near  the  centre  of  the  field,  all  on  the  dexter  side  argent, 
a  ship  on  the  sinister  with  one  mast,  as  if  passing  behind  the  castle,  the  sail  furled, 
and  on  the  stern  a  man  blowing  a  horn,  all  or,  the  mast,  round  top,  and  rigging 
all  of  the  last ;  on  a  canton,  also  argent,  a  cross  between  four  lions  rampant 
gules. 

Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms  ;  but  the  colour  of  the  field  is  not  quoted 
in  the  Visitation  book. 

LYME  REGIS  (Dorsetshire).      Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

LYMINGTON  (Hampshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  on 
the  sea  a  very  antique  ship  of  one  mast,  the  sail  furled  ;  and  on  the  sinister  side 
of  the  mast  an  escutcheon  of  the  arms  of  Courtney,  namely,  "  Or,  three  torteaux, 
a  label  of  three  points  azure,"  with  the  legend,  "Sigillum  burgi  de  Lymington." 

LYNN  REGIS,  or  KING'S  LYNN.     See  King's  Lynn. 

LYON  COURT,  or  LYON  OFFICE,  being  the  Office  of  Arms  for  Scotland 
(Edinburgh).  Argent,  a  lion  sejant  guardant  gules  armed  and  langued  azure, 
holding  in  his  dexter  paw  a  thistle  proper,  and  in  his  sinister  a  shield  of  the 
second,  on  a  chief  azure  a  St  Andrew's  cross  of  the  first. 

The  seal  of  office   is  the  above  between  two  palm  branches,  the  whole 
encircled  with  the  inscription,  "Sigillum  officii  leonis  regis  armorum." 

LYON  KING  OF  ARMS.  The  official  arms  of  Lyon  King  are  the  same  as  the 
arms  of  his  court  [to  which  refer]  and  are  borne  alone  or  impaled  on  the  dexter 
side  of  the  personal  arms  of  Lyon. 

The  escutcheon   is  surmounted  by  his  official  crown  and  placed  upon  two 
batons  in  saltire. 

LYONS  (France).  Gules,  a  lion  rampant  argent,  supporting  in  his  forepaws  a 
sword  erect  proper,  on  a  chief  azure,  three  fleurs-de-lis  or. 

LYON'S  INN.      Refer  to  Lion's  Inn. 


476 


LYDD 


LYON  KING  OF  ARMS 


LYONS 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MACCLESFIELD  (Cheshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  device  upon  the 
seal  shows  a  lion  rampant  holding  a  garb,  and  this  is  sometimes  quoted  as  a 
coat.  The  Town  Clerk's  notepaper,  however,  simply  shows  the  device  as  a 
"badge,"  but  making  the  lion  "guardant,"  and  resting  upon  a  scroll  bearing  the 
Motto — "  Nee  virtus  nee  copia  desunt." 

MACDUFF.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  shows  a  mounted  knight,  and  is 
probably  intended  for  a  representation  of  the  ccest  of  the  Earls  and  Duke  of 
Fife. 

MACKENZIE  RIVER,  See  of  (Canada— formerly  called  Athabasca).     (Azure?) 
Argent,  semee  of  ears  of  maize  slipped  in  chief  an  open  book  and  in  base  a  ]:)air 
of  snowshoes  in  saltire  all  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

MADAGASCAR,  See  of.     Azure,  a  cross  Calvary  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

MADRAS,  Presidency  of.  No  official  warrant  assigning  arms  to  the  Presidency 
has  as  yet  been  issued. 

MADRAS,  See  of.     Argent,  on  a  mount  vert,  in  front  of  a  banyan  tree,  a  kid  on 
the  dexter  couchant  looking  towards  the  sinister,  and  on  the  sinister  a  leopard 
couchant  guardant  all  proper,  a  chief  azure,  thereon  a  dove  rising,  in  the  beak  an 
olive  branch  also  proper  between  two  crosses  pattee  or. 
[Recorded  Heralds'  Coll.  Gts.,  xli.  67?^ 

MADRAS,  University  of.     Refer  to  University  of  Madras. 

MADRID  (Spain).  Tierced  in  pairle  reversed,  dexter  azure,  a  dragon  rampant  or: 
sinister  argent,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert  a  bear  rampant  against  a  tree  within 
a  bordure  azure,  charged  with  seven  mullets  argent :  the  base  or,  a  chaplet. 


478 


MACKENZIE  RIVER,  SEE  OF 


MADAGASCAR,  SEE  OF 


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MADRAS,  SEE  OF 


MADRID 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MAGDALEN  COLLEGE  (Cambridge).     (Founded  in   1541  by  Thomas  Audley, 
Baron  IValden,  and  Lord  Chancellor  of  England.)     Quarterly,  per  pale  indented 
or  and  azure  in  the  2nd  and   3rd  quarters  an  eagle  displayed  of  the  first,  on  a 
bend  of  the  second  a  fret  between  two  martlets  of  the  first. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

MAGDALEN  COLLEGE  (Oxford).  (Founded  in  the  year  1456  by  William 
Patten,  or,  as  he  was  otherwise  called  from  the  place  of  his  nativity,  William  of 
Wainfleet,  Bishop  of  Winchester.)  Lozengy  ermine  and  sable  on  a  chief  of 
the  last  three  lilies  argent,  slipped  and  seeded  or. 

[Recorded  College  of  Arms,  Visitation  of  Oxford,  1574.] 

MAGDALEN  HALL.  Oxford.     Has  no  arms. 

MAGDEBURG  (Germany).  Argent,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert,  an  embattled  gate- 
way gules,  porte  ouvert  and  issuing  from  the  battlements  between  two  towers 
also  gules,  a  demi-maiden  proper,  habited  vert,  and  holding  in  her  dexter  hand 
a  garland. 

MAIDENHEAD  (Berkshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  (I 
presume)  a  maiden's  head. 

MAIDSTONE  (Kent).     Argent,  a  fesse  wavy  azure  between  three  torteaux,  on  a 
chief  gules,  a  lion  passant  guardant  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 


■1-80 


MAGDALEN  COLLEGE  (CAMBRIDGE) 


:;•;▼;*; 


MAGDALEN  COLLEGE (OXFORD) 


MAGDEBURG 


MAIDSTONE 


2H 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MAINE,  State  of  (U.S.A.).  In  a  landscape  field,  on  a  mount  in  base,  a  stag  lodged 
under  a  tree  all  proper.  Supporters — (Dexter),  a  husbandman,  (sinister)  a  sailor. 
Motto—"  Dirigo." 

MAINZ.     Refer  to  Mayence. 

MAKERS  OF  PLAYING  CARDS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London. 
(Incorporated  28th  October  1628.)  Gules,  on  a  cross  argent,  between  the  four 
ace  cards  proper  the  aces  of  hearts  and  diamonds  in  chief  and  of  clubs  and 
spades  in  base,  a  lion  passant  guardant  of  the  first.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  an  armed  arm  erect  holding  in  the  hand  an  ace  of  hearts  all  proper. 
Supporters — Two  men  in  complete  armour  proper,  garnished  or,  on  each  a 
sash  gules. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

MALACCA.     Refer  to  Straits  Settlements. 


482 


MAINE 


MAKERS  OF  PLAYING  CARDS 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MALAGA  (Spain).  Argent,  a  landscape  within  a  bordure  per  pale  gules  and  vert 
charged  with  four  bows  unstrung  and  as  many  sheaves,  each  of  three  arrows 
all  or. 

MALAY,  Federated  States  of.  Vert,  nine  sheaves  of  padi  or,  on  a  chief  argent, 
the  emblem  of  Perak  proper  between  the  crown  of  Pahang  surmounting  two 
daggers  in  saltire  on  the  dexter  and  a  kris  on  the  sinister,  both  also  proper. 

[The  British  Empire  has  not  full  sovereign  rights  in  Malay,  and  only 
administers  the  country  under  treaty.  For  this  reason  no  power  exists  in  the 
Crown  to  assign  arms,  but  the  above  arms  have  been  devised  by  the  Malayan 
authorities  in  consultation  with  the  College  of  Arms  and  may  be  regarded  as 
authentic] 

MALDON  (Essex).  Party  per  pale  azure  and  argent,  on  the  dexter  side  three  lions 
passant  guardant  in  pale  or,  and  on  the  sinister  on  waves  of  the  sea  in  base 
proper  a  ship  of  one  mast  sable,  the  mast  surmounted  by  a  fleur-de-lis  gold,  and 
from  the  masthead  a  pennon  flotant  gules,  the  sail  furled  argent,  and  from  a 
turret  at  the  stern  a  flagstaff  erect  surmounted  by  a  fleur-de-lis  of  the  sixth,  and 
therefrom  a  banner  of  the  first  charged  with  three  lions  passant  guardant  of  the 
third. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

The  seal  represents  upon  one  side  an  escutcheon  charged  with  three  lions 
passant  regardant  in  pale,  and  upon  the  other  with  a  ship  of  one  mast  on  the 
sea,  the  sail  furled,  in  the  stern  a  castle,  thereon  a  flag  charged  with  the  arms  as 
upon  the  other  side  of  the  seal.  The  legend  upon  both  sides  is  the  same, 
namely,  "  Sigillum  commune  corp.  villa;  de  Maldon."  Burke,  in  his  "  General 
Armory,"  quotes  as  the  arms  of  Maldon,  "  Azure,  three  lions  passant  regardant  in 
pale  or."  But  upon  the  Town-Clerk's  notepaper  the  two  sides  of  the  seal  are 
impaled  upon  an  escutcheon,  though  the  lions  are  here  altered  to  guardant  and 
the  ship  is  altered  in  shape,  the  banner  also  being  changed  to  "  gules  a  cross 
argent."  In  Debrett's  "  House  of  Commons,"  a  representation  of  a  seal  is  given 
showing  a  three-masted  ship  of  a  very  different  description,  but  the  legend  here 
is  given  "  Sigillum  officii  admiralitatis  Anglie  inera  precitu  vile  de  Maldon,"  which 
of  course  explains  it. 

MALMO  (Sweden).     Argent,  a  griffin's  head  erased  gules,  crowned  or. 

MALMESBURY  (Wiltshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  a 
castle  with  an  embattled  tower  at  each  end,  on  the  centre  a  tower  domed,  there- 
on a  pennon  ;  on  each  side  of  the  castle  three  ears  of  wheat  on  one  stalk,  in  chief 
on  the  dexter  side  a  mullet  of  six  points,  and  on  the  sinister  an  increscent ; 
again,  on  the  sinister  side  three  balls,  one  near  the  dome  of  the  upper  tower,  and 
the  other  two  near  the  battlements  of  the  sinister  tower,  the  base  barry  wavy  to 
represent  water.  Berry  adds  the  following  note  to  his  description  of  the  seal : — 
"  It  is  also  painted  as  above  on  a  field  gules  in  the  Town  Hall  ;  but  I  believe 
it  never  was  intended  as  an  Armorial  Ensign." 

484 


MALAGA 


MALAY  STATES 


MALDON 


MALMO 


THE   BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

MALTA.  No  arms  are  recorded  for  Malta,  but  the  Admiralty  publish  for  use  upon 
the  Union  flag  by  the  Governor,  the  arms  per  pale  argent  and  gules,  a  bordure  or. 

MALTON  (Yorkshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  in  use  are  "  Argent,  on 
chevron  .  .  .  between  three  tuns  proper,  two  ears  of  corn  ..."  (the  editor 
suggests  that  they  should  be  barley).     Motto — "  Vince  malum  bono." 

MALVERN  COLLEGE.     Or,  five  torteaux  between  two  chevronels,  all  between 
three  fountains  proper.     Motto — "  Sapiens  qui  prospicit." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

MAN,  ISLE  OF.     See  Isle  of  Man. 

MAN.     Refer  to  Sodor  and  Man,  See  of 

MANCHESTER  (Lancashire).  Gules,  three  bendlets  enhanced  or,  a  chief  argent, 
thereon  on  waves  of  the  sea  a  ship  under  sail  proper  ;  and  for  the  Crest — Upon 
a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  terrestrial  globe,  semee  of  bees  volant  all  proper, 
Supporters — On  the  dexter  side  an  heraldic  antelope  argent,  attired,  collared,  and 
chain  refle.\ed  over  the  back  or,  and  on  the  sinister  side,  a  lion  guardant  or 
murally  crowned  gules,  each  charged  on  the  shoulder  with  a  rose  of  the  last. 
Motto — "  Concilio  et  labore." 

The  arms  and  crest  were  granted  ist  March  1S42,  by  Sir  William  Woods, 
Garter,  J.  Hawker,  Clarenceu.x,  and  Francis  Martin,  Norroy;  and  the  supporters, 
2nd  March  1842,  by  Sir  William  Woods,  Garter. 

[Was  the  chief  a  prophecy  of  the  Ship  Canal  ?] 


486 


MALTON 


MALVERN  COLLEGE 


MANCHESTER 


THE  BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

MANCHESTER,  See  of.  Or,  on  a  pale  engrailed  gules,  three  mitres  of  the  field,  a 
canton  of  the  second,  thereon  three  bendlets  enhanced  also  of  the  field. 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  1847.] 

The  arms  on  the  canton  are  the  coat  of  Greslet  or  Grelley,  feudal  Barons  of 
Manchester. 

MANCHESTER  UNIVERSITY.     Refer  to  Owen's  College. 

MANCHESTER.     Refer  to  Our  Lady's  College. 

MANCHESTER,  The  Overseers  of  the  Township  of  Or,  a  bale  of  cotton  goods 
proper,  on  a  chief  azure  between  two  garbs  of  the  first,  a  pale  argent,  thereon  an 
escutcheon  gules,  charged  with  three  bendlets  enhanced  also  of  the  first. 
Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  female  figure  representing  the  Union  of 
Justice  with  Charity,  in  her  right  hand  a  pair  of  scales  and  on  her  left  arm  an 
infant,  all  proper.  Motto — "Justitia  et  benignitate." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  1S58.] 

MANCHESTER  AND   LIVERPOOL   DISTRICT   BANKING  COMPANY. 

Argent,  two  bendlets  gules,  a  bordure  azure,  charged  with  seven  bezants,  a  chief 
sable,  thereon  a  garb  between  two  fusils  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours, 
upon  waves  of  the  sea  proper,  an  ancient  ship  with  three  masts,  sails  furled, 
colours  flying,  all  or,  between  two  coral  branches  proper.  Motto— '' "Dczv^s 
prudentiae  merces." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  1S71.] 

MANCHESTER  AND  SALFORD  BANK.  Azure,  a  garb  or,  banded  gules,  a 
bordure  argent,  charged  with  five  torteaux,  on  a  chief  of  the  second,  three 
bendlets  of  the  third.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours  a  demi-eagle  displayed 
with  two  heads  vert,  each  wing  charged  with  a  bezant  and  on  the  breast  a  trefoil 
slipped  or.  Motto — "  Respice  et  prospice." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  1875.] 

MANITOBA  (Dominion  of  Canada).  Vert,  on  a  rock  a  buffalo  statant  proper,  on 
a  chief  argent  the  cross  of  St  George. 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  loth  May  1905.] 


488 


MANCHESTER,  SEE  OF 


MANCHESTER  AND  LIVERPOOL  DISTRICT 
BANKING  COMPANY 


m 

m 

%A^ 

MANITOBA 


MANCHESTER  AND  SALFORD  BANK 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
MANNHEIM  (Germany).     Or,  a  wolf  hook  gules. 

MANSFIELD  (Nottingham).  Quarterly  sable  and  azure,  a  cross  flory  or,  between 
in  the  first  and  fourth  quarters  a  stag's  head  caboshed  argent,  attired  of  the 
third,  and  in  the  second  and  third  a  cotton  hank  of  the  fourth.  Crest — In  front 
of  an  oak  tree  proper,  two  cross  crosslets  fitchee  saltirewise  argent,  and  between 
as  many  mullets  or.  Motto — "  Sicut  quercus  virescit  industria." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  9th  February  1892.] 

MANTUA  (Italy).  Argent,  a  cross  and  bordure  gules,  in  the  dexter  chief  canton  a 
human  head  couped  at  the  shoulders  proper,  vested  gules  and  wreathed  about 
the  temples  vert. 

The  arms  formerly  used  for  the  Duchy  of  Mantua  were  as  follows : — 
Argent,  a  cross  pattee  throughout  gules,  between  four  eagles   displayed 
sable,  beaked  and  armed  of  the  second.     Crest — On  a  mount  vert,  an  altar  proper 
over  the  altar,  on  an  escroll,  the  word  "  Fides." 

MARBLERS'  COMPANY  (London).  Gules,  a  chevron  argent,  between  two 
chipping  axes  in  chief  of  the  last  and  a  mallet  in  base  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath 
of  the  colours,  an  arm  embowed  vested  azure,  cuffed  argent,  holding  in  the 
hand  proper  an  engraving  chisel  of  the  last.     Motto — "  Grind  well." 

[Of  no  authority.] 

[This  Company  was  amalgamated  with  that  of  the  Masons.] 

MARBLERS'  COMPANY  (Gateshead).     Gules,  a  chevron  between  two  chipping 
axes  in  chief  argent,  and  a  mallet  in  base  or.      Crest— hvi  arm  embowed  vested 
azure,  cuffed  argent,  holding  in  the  hand  proper  an  engraving  chisel  or. 
[Of  no  authority.     From  the  Gateshead  Charter,  1671.] 

MARGATE  (Kent).  Per  pale  gules  and  azure,  a  chevron  argent,  between  in  chief 
a  demi-lion  passant  guardant  conjoined  to  the  demi-hulk  of  a  ship  or,  and  in 
base  a  horse  rampant  of  the  third.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  sea- 
horse supporting  the  mast  of  a  ship,  with  yard  and  rigging  all  proper.  Motto — 
"  Porta  maris  portus  salutis." 

Granted  by  Sir  Charles  George  Young,  Knt,  Garter  Principal  King  of  Arms, 
J.  Pulman,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms,  Robert  Laurie,  Norroy  King  of  Arms, 
I2th  January  1S58. 


49° 


MANNHEIM 


MANTUA 


MANSFIELD 


MARGATE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MARITZBURG  See  of  (S.  Africa).     Per  fesse,  in  chief  azure,  a  saltire  argent, 
above  it  an  estoile  or,  in  base  argent,  on  waves  of  the  sea  a  ship  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

MARKINCH  (Fifeshire).  Has  no  arms,  and  its  seal,  which  is  not  heraldic,  shows  a 
representation  of  the  parish  church. 

MARLBOROUGH,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

MARLBOROUGH  (Wiltshire).  Party  per  saltiie  gules  and  azure,  in  chief  a  bull 
passant  argent,  armed  or,  in  fesse  two  capons  and  in  base  three  grey-hounds 
courant  in  pale  of  the  third,  the  latter  collared  of  the  first  and  ringed  of  the 
fourth  :  a  chief  also  or,  and  thereon  on  a  pale  of  the  second,  between  two  roses 
gules  a  tower  triple-towered  argent. 

Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms. 

The  original  arms  of  Marlborough  as  entered  in  the  Visitation  of  Wiltshire, 
1 565, are  as  upon  the  pale,  namely.  Azure,  a  tower  triple-towered  argent. 

Both  Burke  and  Berry  credit  the  town  with  a  crest  (a  tower  argent),  and 
supporters  (two  hounds)  ;  and  as  the  editor  is  led  to  believe  that  these  are  made 
use  of,  they  are  added  to  the  engraving,  but  it  must  be  distinctly  understood 
that  they  are  bogus,  the  two  coats-of-arms  being  everything  that  is  genuine. 

Berry  adds  the  following  note  : — 

"  The  original  Arms  of  Marlborough  were,  az.  a  tower  triple-towered  arg., 
as  entered  in  the  Visitation  of  the  County  of  Wilts,  taken  1565  ;  as  are  also  the 
before-mentioned  Arms  of  Marlborough,  with  this  note  :  '  These  Arms  are 
belonging  and  appertaining  to  the  Borough,  and  are  commonly  called  of  the 
town  and  borough  of  Marlborough,  in  Wiltshire,  in  commemoration  of  the  duty 
and  homage  heretofore  said  and  done  (time  out  of  mind)  by  the  burgesses  and 
community  to  the  mayor  for  the  time  being,  his  aldermen  and  brethren  of  the 
said  town,  at  the  receiving  of  the  oath  by  any  burgess  by  them  admitted,  at 
which  time  they  do  present  to  the  mayor  a  leash  of  white  greyhounds,  one 
white  bull,  and  two  white  capons  ;  in  perpetual  memory  of  which — I,  Clarenceux, 
King  of  Arms,  have  ratified  and  confirmed  the  said  Arms  to  the  said  borough 
and  community  for  ever  hereafter,  without  contradiction  of  any  person." 

MARLBOROUGH    COLLEGE.      Azure,  an   open    book    proper,  a   chief  gules 
thereon,  on  a  pale  azure  between  two  crosses  patee  fitchee  argent,  a  mitre  or. 
Motto—"  Virtute  studio  ludo." 
[Of  no  authority.] 


492 


MARLBOROUGH   COLLEGE 


MARITZBURG,   SEE  OF 


MARLBOROUGH 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MAROS  VAZARHELY  (A  Royal  Free  Town  in  the  Hungarian  Countship  of 
Maros-Torda  in  Transylvania).  Azure,  an  arm  in  armour  embowed  fesswise  and 
couped  at  the  shoulder,  brandishing  a  sword  all  proper,  on  which  are  transfixed 
the  heart  gules,  and  the  head  of  a  bear  erased  sable.  (This  peculiar  device  is 
taken  from  the  old  escutcheon  of  the  Szekler-Nation).  The  shield  is  surmounted 
by  a  golden  crown. 

MARSEILLES  (France).     Argent,  a  cross  azure. 

MARSHAL.  Refer  to  Earl  Marshal  of  England,  Earl  Marischal  of  Scotland, 
Hereditary  Marshal  of  Ireland. 

MARTIN  COLLEGE.     Refer  to  Merton  College. 

MARYBOROUGH  (Queen's  County).  (Incorporated  by  Queen  Mary  I.  in  the 
year  1551.)  Party  perfesse  gules  and  azure,  in  chief  two  lions  passant  guardant 
in  pale,  and  in  base  two  fleurs-de-lis  in  fesse  or.  Ratified  and  confirmed  as  the 
"anciente  coate-Armour"of  the  Borough  of  Maryborough,  24th  November  1656, 
by  Carney,  Ulster  King  of  Arms.  A  certificate  of  these  arms,  worded  as  under, 
is  preserved  in  Ulster's  Office  : — 

"  The  Atcheiuement  aboue  depicted  is  the  ancient  coate  Armour  properly 
belonging  to  y'=  Borough  and  Towne  of  Maryborough  in  the  Queene's  County 
which  said  borough  or  Towne  continued  an  ancient  Corporation  for  a  long 
time.  It  was  incorporated  by  Queene  Mary.  Whence  it  hath  the  denomination 
of  Mary  Borough  about  the  third  yeare  of  her  raigne  Anno  1557.  By  the 
name  of  Burgomaster  three  Burgesses  and  Commons  and  hath  as  ample  and 
large  priviledges  as  either  the  Towne  of  Drogheda  or  Dundalk.  All  which 
said  coate  Armour  and  Atcheivement  I  Richard  Carney  Esq.  principall  herald 
of  Armes  for  y<^  whole  Dominion  of  Ireland  doe  at  the  request  of  Capt.  Henry 
Gilbert  now  Burgomaster  of  the  same  hereby  Ratify  and  confirme  to  the  said 
Burgomaster  three  Burgesses  and  Commons  and  theire  Successours  ffor  ever. 
All  which  I  have  both  Recorded  in  my  oflSce  and  given  this  Certificate. 

"  In  testimony  whereof  I  have  hereunto  affixed  the  seale  of  myne  office  and 
subscribed  my  name  this  24  day  of  November  1656." 

MARYLAND,  U.S.A  (State  device).  The  figure  of  Justice,  illuminated  with 
rays  of  glory,  her  dexter  hand  resting  upon  a  sword,  and  holding  an  olive- 
-  branch,  the  sinister  elevated  above  the  head  with  the  balance:  at  her  feet  a 
civic  crown,  fasces,  and  cornucopia,  with  the  Motto — "  Industry  the  Means ; 
Plenty  the  Result  "  :  behind  her,  a  ship  and  emblems  of  commerce  ;  the  sea  and 
a  vessel  in  the  distance. 


494 


MAROS  VAZARHELY 


~x 


y 


MARYBOROUGH  (QUEEN'S  COUNTY) 


THE   BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

MARYLEBONE,  Borough  of  (London).  Per  chevron  sable,  and  harry  wavy  of 
six  argent  and  azure,  in  chief  in  the  dexter  a  fleur-de-lis,  and  in  the  sinister  a 
rose,  both  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  upon  two  bars  wavy  argent 
and  azure,  between  as  many  lilies  of  the  first,  stalked  and  leaved  vert,  a  female 
figure  affrontee  proper,  vested  of  the  first,  mantled  of  the  second,  on  the  left 
arm  a  child  also  proper,  vested  or,  around  the  head  of  each  a  halo  of  the  last. 
Motto — "  Fiat  secundum  verbum  tuum." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  17th  August  1901.] 

MASHONALAND,  See  of.  Argent,  a  saltire  gules,  surmounted  by  an  anchor 
proper. 

[Of  no  authoritj'.] 

MASONS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  17th  December 
1677).  Sable,  on  a  chevron  engrailed  between  three  antique  castles  argent,  a 
pair  of  compasses  expanded  chevronwise  of  the  first.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of 
the  colours,  a  castle  argent.  Motto — "  God  is  our  Guide."  (Another,  "  In  the 
Lord  is  all  our  trust." 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

MASONS.     Refer  to  Stornoway,  Incorporated  Trades  of,  and  see  Freemasons. 

MASONS  (Gateshead),  THE  FREE.  Sable,  on  a  chevron  argent,  between  three 
towers  or,  a  pair  of  compasses  extended  azure.  Crest — A  tower  with  a  cupola 
or. 

[Of  no  authority.     From  the  Gateshead  Charter,  1671.] 

MASONS'  COMPANY  (Saumur,  France).     Azure,  a  trowel  or. 

MASONS'  COMPANY  (Tours,  France).      Sable,  a  trowel  or. 

MASONS'  COMPANY  (Beaulieu,  France).  Azure  a  (.'  saltire)  surmounting  a 
pair  of  compasses  extended,  both  interlaced  by  a  serpent  in  pale  or. 

MASONS'  COMPANY  (Edinburgh).     Argent,  on  a  chevron  azure  between  three 
towers  proper,  a  pair  of  compasses  extended  chevronwise. 
[Not  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register.] 

MASONS'  COLLEGE  (Birmingham).     Refer  to  University  of  Birmingiiam. 

MASQUES.  Refer  to  "Office  of  Jests,  Revells  and  Masques  of  our  Lord  the  King 
in  Ireland." 


496 


MARYLEBONE 


MASHONALAND,  SEE  OF 


MASONS'  COMPANY  (EDINBURGH) 


MASONS,  i:OMPANY  OF  (LONDON) 


2  I 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MASSACHUSETTS  (U.S.A.)  (State  device).  On  a  rock,  surrounded  by  the  sea 
and  stormy  clouds  clearing  off;  a  shield,  charged- with  a  female  figure  represent- 
ing America,  resting  her  right  hand  upon  a  bow,  and  holding  in  the  left  an 
arrow,  the  point  downwards  ;  in  the  dexter  chief  a  mullet  of  eight  points  ; 
behind  the  shield  a  mainmast,  and  anchor  bendways.  Crest — On  a  wreath,  a 
dexter  arm  embowed,  the  hand  grasping  a  sword  or  cutlass.  Motto — "  Ense 
petit  placidam  sub  libertate  quietem." 

MASTER  OF  THE  ORDNANCE.     Refer  to  Ordnance,  Master  of. 

MASTER  OF  REVELS  IN  SCOTLAND.      Refer  to  Revels,  Master  of. 

MAURITIUS.  Quarterly  azure  and  or,  in  the  first  quarter  a  lymphad  of  the  last, 
in  the  second  three  palm  trees  eradicated  vert,  in  the  third  a  Icey  in  pale,  the 
wards  downwards  gules,  and  in  the  last  issuant  from  the  base  a  pile  and  in  chief 
a  mullet  argent.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  dodo  per  bend  sinister  embattled 
gules  and  argent,  (sinister)  a  sambur  deer  per  bend  embattled  argent  and  gules, 
each  supporting  a  sugar-cane  erect  proper.  Motto — "Stella  clavisque  maris 
indici." 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  25th  August  1906.] 

MAURITIUS,  See  of.     Barry  wavy  of  ten  argent  and  azure,  a  pastoral  staff  and 
key  in  saltire,  thereon  an  open  book  in  the  fess  point  between  in  chief  a  celestial 
crown  and  in  base  an  anchor  all  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

MAWES,  ST.     See  St  Mawes. 

MAXWELLTOWN  (Kirkcudbright).  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  has  the  crest  of 
Maxwell  of  Terregles,  viz.,  A  stag  lodged  under  a  holly  bush,  with  the  Motto — 
"  Reviresco." 

MAYBOLE  (Ayrshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  but  its  seal  displays,  Or,  a 
chevron  between  three  lions  rampant  gules.  Crest — A  dolphin  naiant.  Motto 
— "  Ad  summa  virtus." 


498 


MAURITIUS 


MAURITIUS,  SEE  OF 


MAYBOLE 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MAYENCE  (Germany).  Argent,  a  cross  pattee  or,  conjoined  with  two  wheels  gules 
bendways,  a  chief  of  the  last. 

MAYENCE,  Elector  and  Prince  Archbishop  of.  (Arch-chancellor  of  the  Holy 
Roman  Empire.)  Gules,  a  wheel  of  six  spokes  argent.  Crest — On  a  princely 
hat  of  crimson  turned  up  ermine,  a  wheel  argent  as  in  the  arms. 

MAYO,  County.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

MEATH,  County.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

MEATH,  See  of.     Sable,  three  mitres  argent,  labelled  or. 

[This  coat,  which  is  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office,  remains  in  use,  but  through 
the  disestablishment  of  the  Irish  Church  it  is  really  extinct,  and  its  present  use 
is  illegal.] 

MECHLIN  (Belgium).     Paly  of  six  gules  and  or  per  fesse  counterchanged. 


500 


MAYENCE,  CITY  OF 


MECHLIN 


MEATH,  SEE  OF 


e 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MECKLENBURG-SCHWERIN,  Grand  Duchy  of.  Quarterly:  i,  or,  a  bull's 
head  and  neck  erased  sable,  langued  gules,  armed  argent,  and  crowned  of  the 
field  (Mecklenburg) ;  2,  azure,  a  griffin  or  (Rostock) ;  3,  per  fesse  in  chief  azure 
a  griffin  or,  in  base  vert,  a  bordure  argent  (Schwerin) ;  4,  gules,  a  cross  couped 
argent,  crowned  or  (Ratzeburg) ;  5,  gules,  a  lady's  dexter  arm  embowed  issuing 
from  the  sinister  side  of  the  holding  in  the  hand  a  ring  (Stargard) ;  6,  or,  a  bull's 
head  caboshed  sable,  langued  gules,  armed  argent,  crowned  of  the  field  (Wenden), 
over  all  on  an  inescutcheon  the  arms  of  Schwerin,  viz.,  per  fess  gules  and  or. 
Crests — I,  out  of  a  crown  five  pales  conjoined  sable  or,  gules,  argent  and  azure, 
and  issuing  therefrom  a  plume  of  peacock  feathers,  and  lying  between  th 
feathers  and  the  pales  an  escutcheon  of  Mecklenburg ;  2,  out  of  a  crown  or,  two 
horns  per  fesse  of  the  last  and  gules  (Schwerin) ;  3,  out  of  a  crown  or,  two  wings, 
the  one  gold,  the  other  azure  (Rostock);  4,  out  of  a  crown  a  demi-griffin  or 
(Schwerin);  S,  out  of  a  crown  seven  banners  gules  (Ratzeburg).  Supporters — 
(Dexter)  a  bull  sable,  armed  argent ;  (sinister)  a  griffin  or.  Motto — "  Per  aspera 
ad  astra." 

MECKLENBURG-STRELITZ,  Grand  Duchy  of.     The  same  arms  and  crests 
and  supporters  as  the  foregoing. 

MELANESIA,  See  of  (New  Zealand).     Azure,  a  Passion  Cross  or,  in  chief  three 
estoiles,  one  and  two  of  the  second. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

MELBOURNE,  University  of     See  University  of  Melbourne,  Australia. 

MELBOURNE,  See  of  (Australia).     Azure,  on  a  chevron  argent,  between  in  chief 
a  crozier  and  a  palmer's  staff  and  scrip  paleways,  and  in  base  four  stars  of  eight 
points  in  cross  of  the  second,  an  open  book  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

MELBOURNE,  ROMAN  CATHOLIC  ARCHDIOCESE  (Australia).     Per  fesse 
azure   and   argent,  in  chief   four  estoiles  argent ;    in   base  a    crosier  bendways 
behind  an  open  book  which  supports  a  heart  inflamed  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

MELCOMBE  REGIS.     See  Weymouth. 


joa 


MECKLENBURG-SCHWERIN 


MELANESIA,  SEE  OF 


MELBOURNE,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MELROSE  (Co.  Roxburgh).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings. 
Those  upon  the  seal  are  "  Azure,  a  hind's  or  lamb's  head  erased  from  which 
issues  the  head  of  a  bishop's  crosier,  in  chief  on  the  dexter  side  a  mason's  '  mell ' 
{i.e.  a  mallet),  and  on  the  sinister  a  rose."  The  use  of  the  device  of  the  mel  and 
the  rose  dates  back  to  1505. 

MERCERS'  COMPANY  (The  Wardens  and  Commonalty  of  the  Mystery  of 
Mercers  of  the  City  of  London).  Gules,  issuant  from  a  bank  of  clouds  a  figure 
of  the  Virgin,  couped  at  the  shoulders  proper,  vested  in  a  crimson  robe  adorned 
with  gold,  the  neck  encircled  by  a  jewelled  necklace,  crined  or,  and  wreathed 
about  the  temples  with  a  chaplet  of  roses  alternately  argent  and  of  the  first,  and 
crowned  with  a  celestial  crown,  the  whole  within  a  bordure  of  clouds  also  proper. 
Crest— On  a  wreath  of  the  colours  issuant  from  a  bank  of  clouds  proper,  a  figure 
of  the  Virgin  as  in  the  arms.     Motto—"  Honor  Deo." 

[Arms  granted  1568  ;  confirmed  at  the  Visitation  of  the  City  of  London  by 
Henry  St  George,  Richmond  Herald,  in  1634.  Arms  confirmed  and  crest  granted, 
College  of  Arms,  September  18,  191 1-] 

MERCERS'   COMPANY  (Durham).      The  banner  of  St  Cuthbert,  thereon  the 
arms  of  the  Company  of  Mercers  of  London. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

MERCHANTS  AND  MERCHANTS  ADVENTURERS.  Refer  to  Edin- 
burgh, Company  of  Merchants  in,  French  Merchants,  Levant  Merchants,  Russia 
Merchants,  Spanish  Merchants,  Staple  Merchants,  Summer  Islands  Merchants, 
Virginia  Merchants,  West  India  Merchants,  Adventurers  (New),  Adventurers 
(Hambrough),  Bristol  Merchants'  Adventurers. 

MERCHANT  ADVENTURERS  TRADING  TO  FRANCE  (Exeter).  (Incor- 
porated 4th  May  1556.)  Azure,  a  tower  triple-towered  or,  standing  on  waves 
of  the  sea  in  base  proper,  in  chief  two  ducal  coronets  of  the  second.  Motto — 
"  Deo  duce  fortuna  comitante." 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

MERCHANTS'  GUILD,  Dublin  (sometimes  called  the  Trinity  Guild).  [Charter 
30  June,  29  Henry  VI.  Incorporated  by  the  name  of  Master  and  Wardens, 
Brethren  and  Sisters  of  the  fraternity  or  Guild  of  the  Arts  and  Mystery  of 
Merchants  of  the  City  of  Dublin.]  Azure,  two  bars  wavy  or,  in  chief  a  lion 
passant  guardant  between  a  harp  or  and  a  castle  argent.  Crest— On  a  wreath 
of  the  colours,  a  ship  under  sail  proper.  Motto — "  Deo  aspirante."  Supported 
on  cither  side  with  a  flying  horse  or,  morally  gorged  azure. 
[Granted  by  Richard  Carney,  Ulster,  April  7,  1684.] 

MERCHANTS   HOUSE  OF  GLASGOW.     Refer  to  Glasgow. 


504 


MELROSE 


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■     THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MERCHANT  TAYLORS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of, "London.  (Incor- 
porated loth  March  1326.)  Argent,  a  Tent  Royal  between  two  Parliament  robes 
purpure,  lined  ermine,  the  tent  garnished  or,  tent-staff,  of  the  la'st,  on  a  chief 
azure,  a  lion  passant  guardant  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  'mount 
vert,  thereon  a  lamb  passant  argent,  all  within  a  glory  or.  Supporters — Two 
camels  or.     Motto — "  Concordia  parvse  res  crescunt." 

'  [Arms  granted  by  Sir  Thomas  Holme,  1480  ;  confirmed  by  Sir  Thomas 
Wriothesley,  1530  ;  crest  and  supporters  granted  by  Robert  Cooke,  Clarenceux, 
23rd  December  1586.  Grants  printed  "Memorials  of  the  Guild  of  Merchant 
Taylors."  The  blazon  in  the  original  grant  is :  "  Argent,  a  pavillion  with  two 
mantles  imperial  purple  garnished  with  gold,  on  a  chief  azure,  a  lion  passant 
or"  ;  but  the  lion  is  certainly  painted  as  "passant  guardant."] 

MERCHANT  TAYLORS'  SCHOOL.  This  school,  which  is  the  property  of 
the  Merchant  Taylors'  Company  and  entirely  controlled  by  them,  very  properly 
uses  the  armorial  bearings  of  the  Company,  though  for  school  purposes 
the  crest  of  the  company  is  most  frequently  made  use  of  Motto — "  Homo 
plantat,  homo  irrigat  sed  Deus  dat  incrementum." 

MERCHANT  TAYLORS,  Company  of  (Exeter).  Argent,  a  tent  sable,  the  top 
purpure,  pole  or,  between  in  fess  two  robes  purpure,  lined  ermine,  on  a  chief 
azure,  a  pascal  lamb  argent,  between  two  sun -bursts  proper,  each  surmounted  by 
a  steeple  argent,  triple  crowned  or.  Crest-rln  a  teiit  as  in  the  arms,  a  lion 
couchant  or.  Supporters — Two  dromedaries  proper,  each  bridled  and  the  line 
reflected  over  the  back  or. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

MERCHISTON  CASTLE  SCHOOL  (Edinburgh).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 
Those  in  use  are.  Argent,  a  saltire  engrailed  between  four  roses  gules.     Crest — A 
hand  proper,  holding  a  crescent  or.     Motto — "  Ready,  aye  ready." 
[These,  of  course,  are  the  arms  of  Napier  of  Merchiston.] 

MERIONETHSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  County 
Council  displays  .  .  .  three  goats  rampant,  two  and  one  ;  from  the  de.xter  base 
the  sun  in  his  splendour  issuant.     Motto — "  Tra  mor  trameirion." 

MERTHYR-TYDFIL  (Glamorganshire).  Azure,  a  representation  of  the  figure 
of  St  Tydfil  and  in  chief  two  crosses  pattee  fitchee,  all  or.  Motto—"  NiD  CADARN 
OND  BRODYRDDE." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  1908.] 


506 


MERCHANT  TAYLORS,  COMPANY  OF 


MERTHYR-TYDFIL 


MERCHISTON  CASTLE  SCHOOL 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MERTON  COLLEGE  (Oxford).  (Founded  1274,  by  Walter  de  Merton,  first  Lord 
Chancellor  of  England,  and  afterwards  Bishop  of  Rochester.)  Or,  three 
chevronels  per  pale,  the  first  and  third  azure  and  gules,  the  second  gules  and 
azure. 

[The  above  arms  are  recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms,  Visitation  of  Oxford, 
1574,  but  those  in  use  according  to  the  University  Calendar  are  the  arms  of  the 
See  of  Rochester,  impaling  those  of  Merton  as  above.] 

MESSINA  (Italy).     Gules,  a  cross  or. 

METROPOLITAN  ASYLUMS  BOARD  (London).  Argent,  on  a  cross  gules, 
the  rod  of  yEsculapius  or,  a  bordure  engrailed  sable.  Crest — Issuant  from  a 
celestial  crown  gules,  a  demi-figure  representing  St  Luke  or.  Supporters — On 
the  dexter  side,  an  eagle,  the  wings  elevated  erminois  gorged  with  a  collar  com- 
posed of  roses  alternately  gules  and  argent ;  and  on  the  sinister  side  a  dragon 
pean  gorged  with  a  collar,  affixed  thereto  a  chain  reflexed  over  the  back  or. 
Motto — "  Miseris  succurrere  disco." 

[Granted.  College  of  Arms,  1914.] 


S08 


MERTON  COLLEGE  (OXFORD) 


MESSINA 


METROPOLITAN  ASYLUMS  BOARD 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

METROPOLITAN  LIFE  ASSURANCE  SOCIETY  (London).  (Established 
1835.)  Or,  on  a  mount  vert,  a  female  figure  proper,  vested  argent,  mantle  azure, 
the  right  arm  extended  and  entwined  by  a  serpent,  holding  in  the  left  hand  a 
human  skull,  both  also  proper,  a  chief  also  azure,  thereon  a  pallet  ermine, 
charged  with  a  dagger  erect  gules  between  two  portcullises  with  chains  or 
Motto — "True  faith,  true  policy." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  August  18,  1885.] 

METZ  (Germany).     Per  pale  argent  and  sable. 

MEXICO.  Argent,  upon  a  rock  issuant  from  the  sea  in  base,  the  nopal  or  tuna 
plant,  thereon  an  eagle  in  full  aspect,  wings  expanded  holding  in  the  beak  a 
snake  or  serpent  all  proper. 

MICHAEL  HOUSE  (Cambridge).  Azure,  the  figure  of  St  Michael  overcoming 
the  serpent. 

[Of  no  authority.] 


510 


METZ  (GERMANY) 


METROPOLITAN  LIFE  ASSURANCE  SOCIETY 


MICHAEL  HOUSE  (CAMBRIDGE) 


MEXICO 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MID-CHINA,  See  of  (now  known  as  Chekiang).     Azure,  on  a  fesse  wavy  argent, 
out  of  which  in  chief  emerges  the  rising  sun,  a  dove  volant,  holding  in  its  beak 
a  sprig  of  olive  proper,  in  base  a  pastoral  staff  and  key  in  saltire  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

MIDDLEHAM,  College  of.  Crockford  gives  the  following  arms  : — "  Qrly.  i  and  4 
England,  2  France,  ancient  3  Ireland." 

Needless  to  say  they  are  quite  spurious. 

MIDDLESBROUGH,  Borough  of  (Yorkshire).  Argent,  a  Hon  rampant  azure, 
on  a  chief  sable,  three  ships  in  full  sail  or,  sails  of  the  first.  Cirst — On  a  mural 
crown  or,  charged  with  three  anchors  erect  sable,  a  lion  passant  azure.  Motto — 
"  Erimus." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  November  8,  191 1.] 

MIDDLESEX,  County  of.     Gules,  three  seaxes  fessewise  points  to  the  sinister 
proper,  in  the  centre  chief  point  a  Saxon  Crown. 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  Nov.  1910.] 

MIDDLE  TEMPLE  (London).  Argent,  on  a  cross  gules,  a  paschal  lamb  or, 
carrying  a  banner  argent,  charged  with  a  cross  gules. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms,  but  the  legal  effect  of  the  record  which 
exists  is  open  to  doubt.] 


512 


MID-CHINA,  SEE  OF 


MIDDLESBROUGH 


MIDDLE  TEMPLE 


MIDDLESEX 


2K 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MIDDLETON  (Lancashire).  Quarterly  per  pale  nebuly  gules  and  argent,  on  a 
fesse  ermine,  between  a  cross  patonce  of  the  second  in  the  first  quarter,  a  mullet 
sable  pierced  of  the  field  in  the  second,  a  silkworm  moth  volant  in  the  third,  and 
a  rock  in  base,  thereon  a  stork  in  the  fourth,  three  sprigs  of  the  cotton-tree  slipped 
and  fructed,  all  proper.  And  for  the  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  upon 
a  mount  vert,  between  two  boars'  heads  erect  and  couped  sable,  a  tower  proper, 
suspended  therefrom  by  a  riband  gules,  an  escutcheon  or,  charged  with  a  lion 
passant  also  gules.     Motto — "  Fortis  in  Arduis." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  28th  January  1887.] 

MIDLETON  (Co.  Cork).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in  Ulster's  Office. 
Lewis's  "  Topographical  Dictionary,"  however,  gives  "  Argent  on  a  chief  vert, 
two  spear-heads  of  the  first,  the  points  embrued  gules."  These  are,  of  course,  the 
arms  of  Brodrick,  Lords  Midleton. 

MIDLOTHIAN.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  County  Council 
shows  an  escutcheon  of  the  Royal  Arms  of  Scotland. 

MILAN  (Italy).     Argent,  a  cross  gules. 

MILAN,  Duchy  of.  Argent,  a  serpent  ondoyant  in  pale  azure,  crowned  gules, 
devouring  a  child  of  the  last. 

MILBOURNEPORT  (Somerset).     Has  no  armorial  bearings.     Burke's  "  General 

Armory  "  quotes  the  following,  though  with  no  colours  mentioned: — "A   lion 
pass,  guard." 

MILITARY  SOCIETY.  Gules,  a  regal  crown  proper,  on  a  chief  argent,  the  cross 
of  St  George.  Crest — On  a  prince's  coronet  or,  a  cubit  arm  in  armour  argent, 
holding  in  the  gauntlet  a  tilting  spear  proper,  thereon  a  banner  gules,  charged 
with  the  motto  "  Ich  dien  "  or.  Supporters — Two  war  horses  argent,  completely 
accoutred  gules,  on  the  head  a  skull  plate,  with  a  spike  in  each,  armour  for  the 
neck,  etc.,  all  azure,  on  each  head  a  plume  of  three  feathers  gules.  Motto — 
"  Floreat  vigeatque  corona." 

[College  of  Arms.     Gtd.  by  Borough,  Garter,  1639.     Refer  to  Warlicke 
'Society,  where  is  a  different  blazon  of  the  same  coat-of-arms.] 

MILLENERS'  COMPANY.  An  ancient  name  for  the  Haberdashers'  Company, 
to  which  refer. 


514 


MIDDLETON  (LANCASHIRE) 


MIDLETON  (CO.  CORK) 


MILAN  (ITALY) 


MILAN,  DUCHY  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MILL  HILL  SCHOOL.      Argent,  a  cross  gules,  on  a  chief  azure  three  mullets 
or.     Motto — "  Et  virtutem  at  musas." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

MILNGAVIE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Its  seal,  which  is  not  of  a  definitely 
heraldic  character,  has  a  very  efTective  design  of  a  cross  moline  and  escallops. 

MILLPORT  (Buteshire).  Has  no  arms.  Those  upon  the  seal  are:  Argent,  on  a 
chevron  between  three  escallops  reversed  as  many  mullets.  Motto — "  Altiora 
videnda." 

[Of  no  authority.] 

MILTON  AND  GRAVESEND.     See  Gravesend. 

MINE  ADVENTURERS.     Refer  to  Miners  Royal. 

MINE  ADVENTURERS  OF    ENGLAND,  The   Governor  and  Company  of. 

(Incorporated  1704.)  Argent,  on  a  chevron  azure,  surmounted  with  the  badge 
of  the  Principality  of  Wales,  between  three  pigs  of  lead  palevvays,  a  plate  ol 
silver  money  impressed  with  the  queen's  head  and  circumscribed,  "  Anna  Dei 
gratia,"  between  two  ingots  of  copper  bendways  dexter  and  sinister  all  proper. 
Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  Justice  proper  in  a  robe  azure,  crowned  with 
an  Eastern  crown  and  crined  or,  in  her  right  hand  a  balance  gold  and  in  her  left 
a  sword  erect  argent,  hilt  and  pommel  or.  Supporters — Two  miners  proper,  in  red 
waistcoats,  white  drawers  and  neckcloths,  their  caps  azure,  hose  and  shoes  sable, 
the  one  holding  in  his  dexter  hand  a  sledge  and  the  other  in  his  left  hand  a 
pick-axe,  both  proper.  Motto — "  The  Mine  Adventurers  of  England." 
[College  of  Arms.     Gts.,  v.  155.] 

MINERAL  AND  BATTERY  WORKS,  Society  of  (London).  (Incorporated 
28th  May  1568.)  Azure,  on  a  mount  vert,  a  square  brazen  pillar,  supported  on 
the  dexter  by  a  lion  rampant  reguardant,  and  on  the  sinister  by  a  dragon 
segreant,  both  or,  in  chief,  on  the  top  of  the  pillar  a  bundle  of  wire  tied  and 
bound  together  of  the  last,  between  a  bezant  on  the  dexter  side  and  a  plate  on 
the  sinister.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  two  arms  embowed  proper  both 
hands  holding  a  calamine  stone  argent  spotted  with  red,  yellow,  and  blue 
Supporters — Two  emblematical  figures,  viz.,  the  dexter  a  female  proper  repre- 
senting Science,  vested  in  a  short  bodice,  coat,  rufT,  etc.,  argent  (being  the  dress 
of  the  ladies  in  the  reign  of  Elizabeth),  in  her  dexter  hand  a  pair  of  compasses, 
and  on  her  head  a  crescent  both  or,  crined  of  the  last  ;  the  sinister  figure,  an 
old  man  proper  representing  Labour,  vested  in  a  long  frock,  turned  up  over  his 
elbows  argent  in  his  sinister  hand  a  hammer  or. 
[College  of  Arms.     Dethick's  Gifts,  25.] 


MILL  HILL  SCHOOL 


VTOj^ 


MILLPORT 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MINERS  ROYAL,  OR  MINE  ADVENTURERS  COMPANY  (London). 
(Incorporated  22nd  May  1568.)  Argent,  a  mine  open  of  earth  colour,  the 
upper  part  variegated  with  various  shrubs  vert,  within  the  mine  a  miner  proper 
vested  sable,  on  his  head  a  cap  argent  round  his  body  a  belt  of  the  last,  and  in 
the  attitude  of  working  the  dexter  side  of  the  mine  witli  two  hammers,  on  the 
sinister  side  a  candle  argent  lighted  proper  in  a  candlestick  azure  fixed  in  the 
mine,  on  a  chief  brown,  a  square  plate  or,  between  a  bezant  on  the  dexter  and 
a  plate  on  the  sinister.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  demi  miner 
proper  vested  and  capped,  as  in  the  arms,  holding  in  his  dexter  hand  a  pointed 
spade  erect  argent  between  two  hammers  in  saltire,  and  in  his  sinister  hand  a 
compass.  Supporters — The'  dexter,  a  miner,  his  face,  legs,  and  arms  of  a 
brownish  colour,  vested  in  a  frock  argent,  tied  above  his  knees  as  at  work,  cap 
and  shoes  of  the  last,  holding  in  his  dexter  hand  erect  a  hammer  azure  handled 
proper ;  the  sinister  supporter,  another  miner  proper,  cap,  frock,  and  shoes 
argent,  the  frock  loose  and  down  to  his  ankles,  in  his  sinister  hand  a  fork  azure 
handled  proper. 

[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.     Dethick's  Gifts,  17/^.] 

MODENA  (Duchy  of).     Azure,  an  eagle  displayed  argent,  crowned  or. 

MOFFAT.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Its  seal  displays  the  Johnstone  crest  of 
the  winged  spur,  with  the  Motto — "  Nunquam  non  paratus." 

MOLDAVIA.     Refer  to  Roumania. 

MONACO.      Fusilly  argent   and    gules.     Supporters — Two  monks  vested  in  long 
robes  sable,  mantles  argent,  each  holding  a  sword  all  proper.     Crest — Out  of  a 
marquis's  coronet  or,  a  fleur-de-lis  of  the  last,  between  two  branches,  viz.,  on  the 
dexter,  a  palm,  on  the  sinister,  a  laurel,  both  proper.     Motto^-"  Deo  juvante." 
[These  are  the  family  arms  of  Grimaldi,  Princes  of  Monaco.] 

MONAGHAN,  County  of.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

MONAGHAN  (Co.  Monaghan).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in  Ulster's 
Office.  Upon  a  sheet  of  Irish  arms  published  by  Marcus  Ward  &  Company, 
Limited,  the  following  are  given: — "Azure,  the  base  masoned  and  embattled, 
therefrom  rising  a  tower  all  argent,  and  perched  thereon  a  martlet  or." 

MONIFIETH  (Co.  Forfar).  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  represents  the  banner  of 
Scotland  surcharged  with  an  escutcheon  upon  which  in  a  landscape  field  is  a 
stag  trippant.     Motto—"  Vis  unita  fortior." 

MOh^MOUTHSHIRE.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

MONMOUTH.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  an  ancient  ship, 
but  Burke's  "General  Armory"  gives  the  arms,  "Azure,  three  chevronels  or 
over  all  a  fesse  gules." 

518 


MONACO 


MONAGHAN  (CO.  MONAGHAN) 


MONMOUTH 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MONTENEGRO.  Gules,  a  double-headed  eagle  displayed  argent  crowned  or,  and 
holding  sceptre  and  orb ;  on  its  breast  an  escucheon  azure,  in  base  a  mount 
vert,  thereon  a  lion  passant  or. 

MONTFORT  AND  FELDKIRCH,  County  of.  Argent,  a  gonfanon  gules,  its 
rings  or. 

MONTGOMERY  (Montgomeryshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal 
represents  an  escutcheon,  and  thereon  two  keys  in  saltire  and  endorsed  ;  and 
these  are  usually  supposed  to  be  the  arms  of  the  Borough.  The  legend  is,  "  Sig. 
Balivorum  et  Burgensium  Mountgomery." 

Berry  and  Burke  add  a  note,  "  By  some  of  the    Arms  of  the   Town  are 
represented  to  be  az.  a  lion  ramp,  or,  within  a  bordure  of  the  last." 

MONTGOMERYSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  which  have  been 
adopted  for  display  upon  the  seal  of  the  County  Council  are, "  Or,  a  lion  rampant 
gules,"  with  the  Motto— "Vo^ys  Paradwys  Cymry."  The  arms  are  those 
attributed  to  Bleddyn  ap  Cynfyn,  King  of  Powys,  A.D.  1046. 

MONTREAL,  See  of  (Canada).     Azure,  a  pastoral  staff  and  key  in  saltire  or, 
surmounted  by  an  open  book  in  the  fesse  point  between  in  chief  a  star  of  six 
points,  and  in  base  an  anchor  argent. 
[Of  no  authority.] 


520 


MONTENEGRO 


MONTGOMERY 


MONTGOMERYSHIRE 


MONTREAL,  SEE  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

MONTROSE  (Forfarshire).  The  entry  in  Lyon  Register  is  as  follows :—"  The 
Royal  Burgh  of  Montrose  gives  for  Ensignes  A i-mortall—  Argent  a  rose  gules. 
The  shield  adorned  with  helmet,  mantling,  and  wreath  suteable  thereto.  And 
for  a  Crest — A  hand  issuing  from  a  cloud  and  reaching  down  a  garland  of  roses 
proper,  supported  by  two  mermaids  aryseing  from  the  sea  proper.  The  Motto 
— Mare  ditat  Rosa  decorat.  And  for  a  revers,  Gules,  St  Peter  on  the  cross 
proper,  with  the  keys  hanging  at  his  girdle  or.  Which  Arms,  &c.,  Ext. 
December  i6,  1694." 

MONTSERRAT.     Refer  to  Leeward  Islands. 

MOOSONEE,  See  of  (Canada).      Per  fesse,  in  chief  azure,  the  aurora  borealis,  in 
base  on  waves  in  front  of  two  islands  each  bearing  a  pine  tree  a  canoe  manned 
by  three  rowers  all  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

MORAVIA.     Refer  to  Austria. 

MORAY,  See  of      Azure,  St  Giles  mitred,  standing  within  a  church  porch  holding 
in  his  dexter  hand  a  cross  and  in  the  sinister  a  book  all  proper. 
[These  arms  were  never  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register.] 

MORAY,  ROSS  AND  CAITHNESS,  Bishop  of.  According  to  Crockford  the 
arms  in  use  are  divided  per  fesse  and  the  chief  per  pale,  in  the  dexter  chief  the 
arms  of  the  See  of  Moray  (to  which  refer),  in  the  sinister  chief  the  arms  of  the 
See  of  Ross  (to  which  refer),  and  in  base  the  arms  of  Caithness.  This  device  is, 
of  course,  quite  unauthorised. 


522 


MONTROSE 


MOOSONEE,  SEE  OF 


MORAY,  SEE  OF 


THE   BOOK   OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MORDEN   COLLEGE,  OR   HOSPITAL  (Blackheath).     Argent  a  fleur-de-lis 
gules  on  a  canton  argent  a  sinister  hand  couped  of  the  second,  for  the  distinction 
of  baronet,  impaling  azure  two  swords  in  saltire  argent  hilt  and  pommel  or, 
within  a  border  engrailed  of  the  third.     Crest — A  lion  rampant  gules. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

MORLEY  (Yorkshire).  Argent,  on  a  fesse  gules,  between  a  sprig  of  the  cotton- 
tree  slipped,  fructed,  and  leaved  proper  between  two  pellets  in  chief,  and  a  pickaxe 
surmounted  by  a  spade  in  saltire  in  base  sable,  a  shuttle  fessewise  or,  thread 
pendant  of  the  first ;  and  for  the  Crest — Upon  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  in  front 
of  a  ram's  head  couped  argent,  a  shuttle  fessewise  proper,  thread  pendant,  also 
argent.     Motto — "  Industria  omnia  vincit." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  gth  August  1887.] 

MOROCCO.     Vert,  three  decrescents  argent. 


524 


MORDEN  COLLEGE 


fnoosTRiR-omniP 
MO RLE Y 


MOROCCO 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MORPETH  (Northumberland).  Barry  (of  ten)  argent  and  gules,  a  tower  triple- 
towered  or,  a  bordure  azure,  charged  with  eight  martlets  of  the  third.  Motto — 
"  Inter  sylvas  et  flumina  habitans." 

The  original  Grant,  of  which  the  following  is  a  copy,  is  still  in  the  possession 
of  the  Corporation  of  Morpeth,  and  clearly  explains  the  origin  of  the  arms  : — 

"To  all  and  Singuler  aswell  kinges  heraldes  and  offycers  of  Armes  as 
nobles  Gentyllmen,  and  others  which  These  presentes  shall  see  or  here,  I  wyllm 
Hervy  esquyere  otherwyse  called  Norrey  principal!  herald  and  kinge  of  Armes 
of  the  Northe  partyes  of  this  realme  of  Englonde,  Sendyth  Due  comendac'ons 
and  gretynge.  fforeasmoche  as  Aunciently  frome  the  begynnynge  the  Re- 
nowne  of  Auncient  Cetys  and  Townes  corporate  hathe  bene  comendyd  to  the 
worlde  by  the  good  Decertes  and  lawdable  actes  and  costomes  of  the  Inhabi- 
tantes  of  the  Same.  Emonge  the  which  I  the  sa}'de  Norrey  kinge  of  armes 
notte  Specyally  at  this  presente  The  good  worshipful  and  well  Dysposed 
p'sones  the  Baylyffe  and  Burgesses  of  the  towne  of  Morpathe  in  the  Countye 
of  Northumbrlonde  hathe  well  and  worshipfully  guyded  and  behaued  them 
selfes  in  all  humble  obedyence  towardes  the  kinges  Ma'°  fifrom  the  begynnynge, 
wherby  they  haue  well  meryted  and  decerned  to  Receyue  the  Signes  and  tokens 
in  Shyldes  called  Armes.  In  consyderac'on  wherof  at  the  gentell  request  of  the 
sayde  Baylyffe  and  Burgesses,  I  haue  asigned  unto  them  Armes  and  blason  mete 
and  convenyent  for  a  further  Demonstrac'on  and  declarac'on  of  theyr  honest  be- 
havyour  and  Demenure  towardes  theyre  prince  and  countrey.  And  further 
hauynge  knowlege  of  credyble  p'sones  of  theyre  tyrst  fowndac'on  I  could  nott 
w'owt  grett  Iniury  of  theyre  fyrst  fownder  The  noble  and  valyaunt  knyght  Sir 
Roger  De  Marlay  assigne  unto  them  any  other  Armes  Then  a  p'cell  of  his 
Armes  for  a  p'petuall  memory  of  his  good  wyll  and  benevolence  towardes  the 
sayde  Towne  so  well  begon  and  so  longe  contynued,  which  were  to  his 
preiudyce  to  haue  it  forgotten  and  brought  in  to  oblyvyon.  In  con- 
syderac'on wherof  I  the  sayde  Norrey  Kynge  of  Armes  in  mann'  and  forme 
abouesayde  by  power  and  auctoryte  of  myn  office  annexed  and  graunted  by  the 
kinges  maiestes  Letters  patentes  under  his  gret  Seale  haue  geuen  and  graunted 
Ratyfied  and  confyrmed  unto  the  sayde  Baylyffe  and  Burgesses  of  the  Towne  of 
Morpath  in  the  countj-e  of  Northumbrelond,  and  to  theyre  Successours  for 
eu'more.  The  olde  and  Auncient  armes  of  the  sayde  Sir  Roger  Marlaye  Thereon 
a  castell  golde  for  the  augmentac'on  for  a  further  Declarac'on  of  theyre  wor- 
shipfull  behavyour  and  goode  decertes  so  well  be  gone  and  long  contynewed. 
As  more  plavnly  aperyth  by  the  pycture  therof  in  this  m'gent.  To  haue  and  to 
holde  to  the  sayde  Baylyffes  and  Burgesses  of  y''  towne  of  Morpathe  and  to 
theyre  Successours,  And  they  it  to  use  and  enjoye  to  their  worshypes  for 
euermore  w'owt  Impedyment  lett  or  interupcyon  of  any  p'son. 

"  In  wytnes  wherof  I  the  sayde  Norrey  kinge  of  Armes  haue  Signed 
these  presentes  w'  my  hande  and  sett  thervnto  The  Seale  of  myn  offyce  and  the 
Seale  of  myn  Armes.  Geuen  the  xx"  Day  of  Maye,  in  Anno  Dni  1552,  and  in 
the  yere  of  owr  Souereigne  Lorde  Edwarde  the  vj"'  by  the  grace  of  god 
kynge  of  Englonde,  ffraunce  and  Yrlonde  Defender  of  the  fayth  and  in  yerth 
under  criste  of  Englonde  and  Yrlonde  the  Supreame  hedd  the  Sixth  yere. 
P'me  Willm  Hervy  als  Norrey  Roy  d'armes." 

526 


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MORPETH 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
MOSCOW  MERCHANTS.     Refer  to  Russia  Merchants. 

MOSCOW  (Russia).  Gules,  the  figure  of  St  George  on  horsebacli  slaying  a  dragon 
with  a  spear,  all  proper. 

MOSSLEY  (Lancashire).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

MOTHERWELL.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  shows  a  railway  bridge, 
thereon  a  train  and  below  a  pit-head.  In  the  centre  on  a  shield,  supported  on 
the  dexter  side  by  Vulcan  with  his  hammer  in  a  provocative  attitude,  is  a  repre- 
sentation of  the  Town  Hall. 

MUCH  WENLOCK  (Shropshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal,  which 
was  recorded  at  the  visitations,  represents  a  triple  canopy,  the  centre  com- 
partment being  occupied  by  the  figure  of  a  saint  crowned  with  a  nimbus,  seated 
and  supporting  a  crucifix  ;  on  the  dexter  side  is  a  figure  crowned  with  a 
coronet,  and  holding  a  crosier  in  the  sinister  hand,  and  on  the  sinister  is  the 
figure  of  St  George  trampling  on  the  dragon,  though  the  engraver  has  made 
the  holy  saint  left-handed,  representing  him  as  holding  a  sword  in  his  left  hand 
and  his  shield  on  his  right  arm.  At  the  base  of  the  seal  are  three  escutcheons, 
the  centre  one  charged  with  a  lion  rampant,  the  dexter  with  a  stag  trippant, 
and  the  sinister  with  a  chevron  between  three  blackamoors'  heads.  This  last 
represents  the  arms  of  the  ancient  family  of  Wenlock  of  Wenlock,  now  extinct 
it  is  believed  in  the  male  line,  but  represented  by  Lord  Wenlock,  who  is  entitled 
(so  the  editor  believes)  to  quarter  these  arms.  They  are  suspended  from  the 
collars  of  his  supporters.  A  smaller  seal  represents  the  letters  W.E.N. ,  and  a 
fetter-lock,  i.e.  Wen-lock. 

MULHAUSEN  (Germany).     Argent,  a  mill-wheel  gules. 

MULLINGAR  (Co.  Westraeath).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in  Ulster's 
Qfifice.  The  coat  attributed  to  the  town  in  the  sheet  of  Irish  arms  published 
by  Marcus  Ward  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  the  design  of  which  is  taken,  I  believe,  from  the 
seal,  is  beyond  my  powers  to  blazon. 

MUNCHEN.     Refer  to  Munich. 

MUNICH.  Or,  a  boy  monk  habited  in  a  robe  sable,  trimmed  with  fur  argent,  about 
his  head  a  nimbus  gules,  his  dexter  hand  raised  in  benediction  and  holding  in 
his  sinister  a  book  also  gules. 

MUNSTER,  Bishopric  of.  Quarterly  of  six,  three  and  three:  first  and  sixth,  per 
fesse  argent  and  gules  on  the  fesse  line,  three  birds  issuant  to  the  sinister  sable 
(for  Stromberg) ;  second  and  fifth,  azure  a  fesse  or  (for  Munster) ;  third  and 
fourth  (Borkelo) ;  over  all  an  escocheon  argent. 

MUNSTER,  Province  of  (Ireland).     Azure,  three  antique  crowns  or. 
[Recorded  in  Ulster's  Office.] 

528 


MOSCOW 


MULHAUSEN 


MUNSTER,  PROVINCE  OF 


MUNICH 


2L 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

MURLO  (Province  of  Siena,  Tuscany).  Gules,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert,  a  castle 
argent,  and  either  side  thereof  a  mouse  climbing  proper. 

MUSCOVY  MERCHANTS.     Refer  to  Russia  Merchants. 

MUSES,  Academy  of.     Refer  to  Academy  of  the  Muses. 

MUSIC,  Trinity  College  of.     Refer  to  Trinity  College  of  Music. 

MUSICIANS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  9th 
Edward  IV.)  Azure,  a  swan  with  wings  expanded  argent,  within  a  double 
tressure  flory  counterflory  or,  on  a  chief  gules,  a  pale  between  two  lions 
passant  guardant  or,  thereon  a  rose  of  the  fourth,  seeded  of  the  third,  barbed  vert. 
Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  lyre  or.  Motto — "  Harmonj'." 
[Granted  by  William  Camden,  Clarenceux,  October  1604.] 

MUSSELBURGH  (Midlothian).  The  "Honest  Town"  of  Musselburgh's  arms  are 
azure,  three  anchors  in  pale,  one  in  chief  and  two  in  the  flanks  or,  accompanied 
with  as  many  mussels,  two  in  the  dexter  and  sinister  chief  points  and  the  third 
in  base  proper.  In  an  escroll  above  the  shield  this  Motto — "  Honesty." 
Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  2nd  October  1771.  Signed  R.  Boswell, 
Lyon  Dep. 

The  seal,  which  has  the  legend,  "  Sigillum  commune  de  Musselburgi," 
shows  the  above  arms,  and  in  addition  has  for  a  crest  a  skeleton,  a  mantle  flying 
from  his  shoulders,  on  his  sinister  arm  an  escutcheon  charged  with  a  cross, 
holding  in  his  dexter  hand  a  spear  which  he  is  piercing  through  a  dragon  over- 
turned at  his  feet.     The  motto  is  here  rendered  "  Honestas." 


530 


MURLO 


MUSSELBURGH 


MUSICIANS,  COMPANY  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

NAAS  (Co.  Kildare).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in  Ulster's  Office. 
Those  it  appears  to  be  credited  with  are  argent,  a  serpent  erect  proper.  Motto — 
"  Prudens  ut  serpens." 

NAGPUR,  See  of  (India).     Argent,  a  cross  calvary  and  in  base  a  snake  nowed. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

NAIRNSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  County  Council 
exhibits  four  crests,  and  in  explanation  of  these  the  clerk  to  the  County  Council 
writes  as  follows  : — 

"County  Clerk's  Office,  Nairn,  14th  August  1893. — Dear  Sir, — I  duly 
received  your  letter  of  the  4th,  and  I  now  enclose  an  impression  of  the  Seal  of 
the  Nairn  County  Council.  The  Eagle  is  the  Crest  of  Major  Rose  of  Kilravock, 
Lord-Lieutenant  of  the  County,  the  Swan  that  of  the  Earl  of  Cawdor,  the  Hand 
with  three  arrows  that  of  Brodie  of  Brodie,  and  the  Boar's  Head  that  of  the  late 
General  Baillie  of  Lochloy.  The  Families  of  Kilravock,  Cawdor,  and  Brodie 
have  been  intimately  identified  with  the  history  of  the  County  for  the  last  six 
centuries  or  more,  and  it  was  chiefly  on  this  account  that  the  Seal  took  its  form. 
General  Baillie  being  the  first  Convener  of  the  County  under  the  Local 
Government  Act,  it  was  thought  appropriate  that  his  Crest  should  also  appear 
on  the  Seal. — Yours  faithfully,  (Signed)  H.  T.  DONALDSON." 

NAIRN  (Nairnshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The  seal 
represents  the  full-length  figure  of  a  saint  vested  and  crowned  with  a  nimbus, 
holding  in  his  dexter  hand  a  staff  terminating  in  a  cross,  and  in  his  sinister  an 
open  book.     The  legend  is  "  Sigillum  commune  burgi  de  Nairne." 

NANCY  (France).  Per  fesse  or  and  argent,  in  chief  on  a  bend  gules,  three  alerions 
argent,  in  base  a  thistle  slipped,  leaved,  and  flowered  proper. 

NANTES  (France).  Gules,  on  waves  of  the  sea  in  base  proper,  a  three-masted 
ship,  sails  furled  all  proper,  a  chief  ermine. 


532 


NAAS 


NAGPUR,  SEE  OF 


NANCY 


NANTES 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

NAPLES,  City  of  (Italy).     Per  fesse  or  and  gules. 

[The  former  Kings  of  Naples  bore  "  azure,  seme-de-lis  or,  a  label  of  three 
points  gules.] 

NASSAU,  See  of  (West  Indies).  Argent,  a  landscape,  in  base  on  a  rock,  an  open 
Bible  at  the  foot  of  an  lona  cross :  behind  it  the  open  sea,  thereon  a  ship  sailing 
to  the  sinister  and  a  palm-covered  land.  [E.x.  Woodward.]  Gules,  an  lona  cross 
proper,  on  a  chief  dancette  or,  on  a  pale  azure  between  two  palm  trees  proper, 
a  ship. 

[Both  of  no  authority.] 

NATAL,  Colony  of  (South  Africa).     Azure,  in  front  of  mountains,  and  on  a  plain 
two  black  wildebeesten  in  full  course  at  random,  all  proper. 
[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  i6th  May  1907.] 


534 


.^A. 


Aa cA 


<%>  ^  ^ 


NAPLES,  KINGDOM  OF 


NAPLES,  CITY  OF 


NATAL  (COLONY  OF) 


NASSAU,  SEE  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

NATAL,  Province  of  (Union  of  South  Africa).  Or,  two  black  wildebeesten  in 
full  course  at  random,  both  proper. 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  4th  May  191 1.] 

NATAL,  See  of.     Gules,  a  saltire  and  in  chief  a  star  of  six  points  argent. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

NATIONAL  BANK  OF  SCOTLAND.  Or,  the  image  of  St  Andrew  with  vesture 
vert  and  surcoat  purpure,  bearing  before  it  the  cross  of  his  martyrdom  argent, 
all  resting  on  a  base  of  the  second,  in  the  dexter  flank  a  garb  gules,  in  the 
sinister  a  ship  in  full  sail  sable,  the  shield  surrounded  with  two  thistles  proper 
disposed  in  orle,  and  crossing  each  other  at  foot  and  top  with  this  motto  upon 
an  escroll,  which  may  be  placed  either  above  or  below  the  shield  as  convenient, 
"In  patriam  fidelis."  [Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  1826.]  These  arms  were 
rematriculated  with  crest  and  supporters,  i/th  April  1913,  in  the  following 
terms : — "  Or,  the  apostle  St  Andrew  habited  in  his  robes  purpure,  and  vested 
vert,  bearing  before  him  the  cross  of  his  martyrdom  argent,  the  cross  and  feet 
resting  upon  a  champagne  of  the  third,  in  the  dexter  flank  a  garb  gules,  and  in 
the  sinister  a  ship  under  full  sail  sable,  the  shield  surrounded  with  two  thistles 
proper,  disposed  in  orle.  Mantling — Sable,  doubled  or.  Crest— U'pon  a  wreath 
of  the  liveries,  the  Star  of  the  Order  of  the  Thistle  proper.  Motto — "  In  patriam 
fidelis."     Supporters — Two  lions  rampant  gules,  armed  and  langued  azure. 

NATIONAL  UNIVERSITY  OF  IRELAND.     See  University  of  Ireland. 


536 


NATAL,  PROVINCE  OF 


NATAL,  SEE  OF 


NATIONAL  BANK  OF  SCOTLAND 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

NAVAN  (Co.  Meath).     Azure,  out  of  clouds  in  base  a  naked  arm  couped  at  the 
elbow  erect  in  pale,  holding  in  the  hand  a  human  heart  all  proper  ;  between  on 
the  dexter  an    Irish  harp  or,   and  on  the  sinister  a  rose  argent  slipped  and 
leaved  vert,  both  in  fesse,  in  chief  the  royal  crown  gold. 
[Registered  in  Ulster's  Office.] 

NAVARRE.     Refer  to  France,  King  of. 

NAVIGATION,  The  Art  of.     Gules,  a  cross  between  four  ships  argent. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

NAVY  OFFICE.  The  seal  represents  an  anchor  in  pale  between  two  small  anchors 
erect,  within  the  beam  and  fluke,  with  this  Motto,  "  Sigillum  Officii  Navalis." 

NEATH  (Glamorganshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  a 
tower,  etc. 

NEEDLEMAKERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated 
loth  November  1656.)  Azure  (?  Vert),  three  needles  in  fesse  argent,  each 
ducally  crowned  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  Moor's  head  couped 
at  the  shoulders,  in  profile  proper,  wreathed  about  the  temples  argent  and  gules, 
vested  round  the  shoulders  argent,  in  his  ear  a  pearl.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a 
man,  (sinister)  a  woman,  both  proper  and  each  wreathed  round  the  waist  with 
leaves  of  the  last,  in  the  woman's  dexter  hand  a  needle  argent.  Motto — "  They 
sewed  fig-leaves  together  and  made  themselves  aprons." 

[The  supporters  are  usually  called  Adam  and  Eve,  and  the  original  crest 
was  a  tree  proper.     The  arms  are  of  no  authority.] 

NELSON,  Borough  of  (Lancashire).  Azure,  on  a  chevron  argent,  between  two 
sprigs  of  the  cotton-tree  slipped  and  fructed  in  chief  and  a  fleece  in  base  or, 
two  reed-hooks  chevronwise  proper.  Crest — Upon  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  upon 
a  shuttle  fessewise  or,  a  cock  gules,  holding  in  the  beak  a  sprig  of  the  cotton- 
tree  slipped  and  fructed  proper.     Motto — "  By  industry  and  integrity." 

Granted  by  Sir  Albert  William  Woods,  Knight,  Garter  Principal  King  of 
Arms,  Walter  Aston  Blount,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms,  George  E.  Cokayne, 
Norroy  King  of  Arms,  sth  May  1891. 


538 


NAVAN 


NELSON 


NEEDLEMAKERS,  COMPANY  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

NELSON  (New  Zealand),  See  of.     Or,  a  calvary  cross  azure,  on  a  canton  of  the 
second,  three  stars  of  six  points  argent. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

NETHERLANDS,  Kingdom  of.  Azure,  seme  of  billets,  a  lion  rampant  crowned 
or,  holding  in  its  dexter  paw  a  naked  sword,  and  in  the  sinister  a  bundle  of 
arrows  proper.  Supporters — Two  lions  guardant  crowned  or.  Motto — "Je 
maintiendrai." 

NEUCHAtEL  (Switzerland).  Tierced  in  pale  vert,  argent  and  gules,  in  the 
sinister  chief  point  a  cross  couped  of  the  second. 

NEVIS.     Refer  to  Leeward  Islands. 

NEW  ADVENTURERS.     Refer  to  Adventurers. 


S40 


■^■^^■■B 

* 


NEUCHATEL 


NELSON  (NEW  ZEALAND),  SEE  OF 


NETHERLANDS 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

NEW   BRUNSWICK,  Province  of  (Dominion  of  Canada).     Or,  on  waves  a 
lymphad  with  oars  in  action  proper,  on  a  cliief  gules  a  lion  passant  guardant  or. 
[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant.] 

NEW  COLLEGE  (Oxford).  (Founded  in  1 379  by  William  de  Wykeham,  Bishop  of 
Winchester  and  Lord  Chancellor  of  England.)  Argent,  two  chevronels  sable, 
between  three  roses  gules,  seeded  or,  barbed  vert.  Motto—"  Manners  makyth 
man." 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms  at  the  Visitation  of  the  County  of  Oxford, 

IS  74-] 

NEW  GALLOWAY  (Wigtownshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings. 
The  Town-Clerk  forwarded  an  engraved  representation  of  the  following  arms. 
It  is  a  pity  they  are  not  matriculated,  because  in  their  present  form  they  are 
absolutely  unique.  Gules,  on  a  cross  couped  argent,  the  upper  part  thereof  enfiled 
with  a  coronet  showing  nine  small  pearls  upon  the  rim,  a  boar's  head  erased 
proper,  above  the  escutcheon  is  placed  a  peer's  helmet  and  a  lambrequin,  and 
thereupon  on  a  wreath  a  boar's  head  erased,  as  in  the  arms  for  a  Crest.  Above 
the  Crest  appears  another  coronet,  also  as  in  the  arms.  For  Supp07-tcrs — On  the 
dexter  side  a  savage  wreathed  about  the  head  and  waist  with  laurel,  and  holding 
over  his  exterior  shoulder  a  club  all  proper,  and  on  the  sinister  side  a  ram  also 
proper.  Motto — "  Cruce  crescimus."  The  legend  upon  the  seal  is  "  Sigillum 
commune  burgi  Gallouidise." 

NEW  GUINEA.     Refer  to  British  New  Guinea. 

NEW  HAMPSHIRE,  U.S.A.  (State  Device.)  A  dock-yard,  with  a  ship  on  the 
stocks,  the  sun  rising  from  the  ocean. 

NEW  INN,  or  OUR  LADY'S  INN.  Vert,  a  flowerpot  argent,  with  gilliflowers 
gules,  leaved  vert. 

[Of  no  authority.] 


542 


NEW  BRUNSWICK 


NEW  COLLEGE  (OXFORD) 


NEW  GALLOWAY 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
NEW  INN  HALL  (Oxford).     Has  no  arms. 

NEW  JERSEY,  U.S.A.  (State  Device.)  A  shield,  charged  with  three  ploughs  in 
pale.  Crest — On  a  wreath,  the  head  of  a  horse  couped  ;  supported  on  the 
dexter  side  by  the  figure  of  Liberty,  and  on  the  sinister  by  that  of  Plenty. 

NEW  ROMNEY.     See  Romney. 

NEW  ROSS  or  ROSS  (Co.  Wexford).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in 
Ulster's  Office.  Both  the  seals  represent  on  a  bridge  of  five  arches  over  water 
a  stag  and  a  greyhound  in  full  course  towards  the  sinister,  the  dog  with  its  head 
regardant  biting  at  the  neck  of  the  stag.  The  device  is  not  unlike  that  of 
Clonmel. 

NEW  SOUTH  WALES  (Commonwealth  of  Australia).  Azure,  a  cross  argent, 
voided  gules,  charged  in  the  centre  point  with  a  lion  passant  guardant,  and 
on  each  member  with  a  mullet  of  eight  points  or,  between  in  the  first  and 
fourth  quarters  a  fleece  of  the  last  banded  of  the  second,  and  in  the  second  and 
third  quarters  a  garb  also  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  rising  sun, 
each  ray  tagged  with  a  flame  of  fire  proper.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  lion 
rampant  guardant,  (sinister)  a  kangaroo,  both  or.  Motto — "  Orta  recens  quam 
pura  nites." 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  nth  October  1906.  Refer  to  Australia. 
The  old  bogus  coat  argent,  on  a  cross  gules,  a  lion  passant  guardant  between 
four  eight-pointed  stars,  now  incorporated  in  the  arms  of  Australia,  is  the  device 
used  upon  the  Union  flag  by  the  Governor.] 

NEW  WESTMINSTER,  See  of  (Canada).      Azure,  a  cross  flory  between  five 
martlets  or,  on  a  chief  dancetty  or,  between   two  roses  gules,   a   pale   ermine, 
thereon  a  mitre  proper. 
[Of  no  authorit)'.] 

NEW  YORK,  City  of  (U.S.A.).  Argent,  the  sails  of  a  windmill  in  saltire  between 
two  beavers  passant  in  pale,  and  as  many  tuns  in  fesse  all  proper. 

NEW  YORK,  State  of  (U.S.A.)  (State  Device.)  Arms  :  in  base  a  landscape,  over 
which  the  sun  is  rising  in  splendour.  Crest — On  a  wreath,  upon  part  of  a 
globe  or  sphere,  an  eagle  regardant,  wings  expanded.  Supporters — (Dexter) 
Justice  blindfold,  supporting  with  the  right  hand  the  fasces,  and  holding  with 
the  left  a  sword  ;  (sinister)  Liberty,  holding  in  the  right  hand  a  palm-branch, 
and  supporting  with  the  left  the  staff  and  cap.     Motto — "  Excelsior." 


544 


NEW  SOUTH  WALES 


NEW  YORK,  CITY  OF 


NEW  WESTMINSTER,  SEE  OF 


2  M 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

NEW  ZEALAND,  Colony  of.  Quarterly  azure  and  gules,  on  a  pale  argent,  three 
lymphads  sable  between  in  the  first  quarter  five  mullets  in  cross  of  the  third, 
each  charged  with  a  mullet  of  the  second,  in  the  second  quarter  a  fleece,  in  the 
third  a  garb,  and  in  the  fourth  two  hammers  in  saltire  all  9r.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  a  demi-lion  rampant  guardant  or  supporting  a  flag-staff 
erect,  therefrom  flying  to  the  sinister  a  banner  of  the  Union.  Supporters — 
(Dexter)  a  female  figure  proper,  vested  in  a  flowing  robe  argent,  holding  in 
her  exterior  hand  a  flagstaff  proper,  thereon  a  banner  azure,  thereon  a  Canton 
of  the  Union,  and  in  the  fly  the  constellation  as  in  first  quarter  of  the  arms; 
(sinister)  a  native  habited  all  proper.     Motto — "  Onward." 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  191 1.] 

A  badge  of  "  a  frond  of  fern  "  has  been  adopted  as  a  floral  device,  but  this 
has  no  official  sanction  or  recognition. 

NEWARK.     See  Port  Glasgow. 

NEWARK  (Nottinghamshire).  Barry  wavy  of  six  argent  and  azure,  on  a  chief 
gules,  a  peacock  in  his  pride  proper,  between  a  fleur-de-lis  on  the  dexter,  and  a 
lion  passant  guardant  on  the  sinister  or.  Crest — A  cormorant  or,  holding  in  the 
beak  an  eel  proper.  Supporters — On  the  dexter  an  otter,  and  on  the  sinister  a 
beaver. 

The  arms  and  crest  were  granted  by  Dethick,  Garter,  8th  December  1561, 
and  the  supporters  allowed  at  a  later  date.  The  grant  is  printed  in  "  Annals  of 
Newark."  Elvin,  in  his  "  Dictionary  of  Heraldry,"  quotes  the  Crest,  "  On  a  wreath 
ar.  and  b.  a  Morfex  argent,  bekyd  sa.  therein  a  cele  in  p'pur  coler."  Burke  in  his 
"  Armory  "  calls  it  "  a  seagull  proper,  holding  in  the  beak  an  eel  arg."  Berry  goes 
further  afield,  for  he  gives  it  "  a  martlet,  holding  in  the  beak  a  snake,"  and  gives  the 
peacock  between  tivo  fleurs-de-lis.  The  seal  of  the  town  makes  the  supporters 
similar,  and  like  boars,  only  the  feet  have  claws,  and  the  tail  is  peculiar. 

In  1912  the  Corporation  adopted  a  new  motto,  "Deo  fretus  erumpe,"  a 
translation  of  the  words  of  Mayor  Smith  in  1646,  during  the  siege  of  Newark, 
to  Lord  Bellasyse,  "  Trust  God  and  sally." 

NEWBURGH  (Fifeshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The  seal 
represents  a  thistle  slipped  and  leaved,  and  ensigned  with  the  Royal  Crown. 

NEWBURY  (Berkshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  on  a 
mount  a  castle  of  three  towers,  each  having  a  dome,  and  thereon  a  pennon. 


546 


NEW  ZEALAND 


NEWARK 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

NEWCASTLE  (Northumberland),  See  of.  Has  no  arms.  The  following  device 
is  used  but  has  not  any  authority  whatever,  viz.,  Per  fesse  azure  and  gules,  in 
chief  a  representation  of  the  cross  of  St  Cuthbert  or,  and  in  base  three  castles, 
two  and  one,  argent. 

NEWCASTLE  (Australia),  See  of     Azure,  an  open  crown  enfiling  a  pastoral  staff 
in  pale  or,  on  a  bordure  sable,  twenty-four  billets  argent. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

NEWCASTLE-UNDER-LYME  (Staffordshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings. 
The  seal,  which  is  very  intricate,  and  of  an  architectural  design,  has  three 
escutcheons  hanging  from  the  battlements.  That  on  the  dexter  side  represents 
a  lion  rampant  within  a  border  charged  with  roundles  ;  that  in  the  centre 
represents  three  lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  ;  that  on  the  sinister  represents 
three  garbs,  two  and  one,  apparently  the  Royal  Coats  of  Cornwall,  England, 
and  Chester.  Rising  above  the  battlements  are  the  figures  of  two  men,  one 
blowing  a  horn,  the  other  holding  a  battle-axe.  The  legend  is  "  Sigill.  comune 
burgensium  novi  castelli." 

NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE  (Northumberland).  Gules,  three  towers  triple- 
towered  argent.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  tower  argent,  therefrom 
issuant  a  demi-lion  rampant  guardant  or,  holding  a  flagstaff  sable,  therefrom 
flowing  a  split  banner  of  St  George.  Supporters — On  either  side,  a  sea-horse 
argent,  crined  and  finned  or.  Motto — "  Fortiter  defendit  triumphans."  The 
following  extract  is  taken  from  Richardson's  "  Table  Book  " : — 

"  At  what  period  Armorial  Bearings  were  first  granted  to  the  town  of 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne  has  not  been  recorded  ;  but  it  may  be  inferred  from  an 
ancient  shield  formerly  placed  on  the  north  front  of  the  Newgate,  which  was 
pulled  down  in  1823,  that  they  were  used  prior  to  the  year  1390,  at  which  period 
the  gate  is  mentioned  under  the  above  appellation  in  an  inquisition  in  the 
Tinmouth  Chartulary  at  Northumberland  House.  The  inference  appears  to  be 
considerably  strengthened  by  the  circumstance  of  another  shield  containing  the 
Arms  of  England  having  been  sculptured  on  the  right  of  the  above,  in  which 
the  fleur-de-lis  were  semee,  the  number  of  these  having  been  reduced  to  three 
in  the  time  of  Henry  V.,  Aug.  16,  1575.  William  Flower,  Esq.,  Norroy  King  of 
Arms,  granted  the  addition  of  a  helmet,  crest,  and  supporters  to  the  ancient 
Arms  of  Newcastle.  No  motto  occurs  in  this  grant.  In  all  probability  the 
motto  was  added  after  the  gallant  defence  of  the  town  against  the  Scots."  In 
speaking  of  the  siege  of  Newcastle,  the  writer  adds  : — "  Thus  was  the  town  taken 
from  the  King,  after  an  obstinate  and  gallant  defence,  and  may  well  assume  the 
motto  bestowed  upon  it  by  the  unfortunate  monarch — Fortiter  defendit 
triumphans." 


548 


NEWCASTLE  (NORTHUMBERLAND),  SEE  OF 


NEWCASTLE  (AUSTRALIA),  SEE  OF 


NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

"NEWE  CORPORATION  OF  FREEMEN  IN  THE  SUBURBS 
ABOUT  LONDON,"  sometimes  called  the  "TRADESMEN  AND 
ARTIFICERS'  SOCIETY."  Quarterly  gules  and  azure,  a  cross  argent, 
surmounted  by  another  of  the  first,  between  in  the  first  quarter  a  lion 
passant  guardant,  in  the  second  a  fleur-de-lis,  in  the  third  a  rose,  and  in  the 
fourth  a  portcullis,  all  or.  Crest — A  demi-maiden  affrontee  proper,  vested, 
on  her  head  a  chaplet  of  roses,  and  holding  in  her  hands  a  dove  all 
argent.  Supporters — On  the  dexter  side  a  female  figure  vested  (representing 
"  Concord"),  holding  in  the  dexter  hand  a  bundle  of  javelins  all  argent,  and  on 
the  sinister  side  a  man  habited  as  a  workman  (representing  "  Industry  "),  holding 
in  the  sinister  hand  a  crank  also  argent. 

[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.  Granted  by  Sir  John  Borough,  Garter,  loth 
July  1637.] 

NEWFOUNDLAND,  "  Country  of."  Gules  a  cross  argent,  in  the  first  and  fourth 
quarters  a  lion  passant  guardant  regally  crowned  or ;  in  the  second  and  third 
quarters  an  unicorn  passant  argent,  armed,  maned,  and  unguled  of  the  third, 
and  gorged  with  a  crown,  thereto  a  chain  affixed  passing  between  the  forelegs 
and  reflected  over  his  back,  also  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours  an  elk 
trippant  proper.  Supporters — Two  Newfoundland  men,  in  the  habits  of  that 
country  all  proper,  viz.,  the  body  covered  with  skins  to  the  middle  of  the  thigh, 
round  the  neck  and  breast  two  rows  of  pearl  shells,  and  round  the  body  two 
rows;  at  the  back  shields  made  of  skins,  and  in  their  exterior  hands  bows,  each 
supporter  charged  on  the  breast  with  a  mascle  or.  Motto — "  Oujerite  prime 
regnum  Dei." 

[Granted  by  Borough,  Garter,  ist  Jan.  1637.  This  coat  of  arms  has  been 
generally  attributed  to  the  Newfoundland  Company.  The  grant,  however,  was 
made  to  "the  country."  The  Admiralty  publish  as  a  device  to  be  used  by  the 
Governor  upon  the  Union  flag  a  white  disc,  thereon  the  figure  of  Britannia  on 
the  sinister,  extending  her  hand  towards  a  figure  of  Mercury  and  a  kneeling 
sailor.     Motto — "  Haec  tibi  dona  fero."] 


550 


FREEMEN  IN  THE  SUBURBS  ABOUT  LONDON 


NEWFOUNDLAND 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

NEWFOUNDLAND,  See  of.  Argent,  on  a  cross  between  four  crosses  pattee 
gules,  an  imperial  crown  proper,  a  chief  azure,  thereon  a  paschal  lamb  couchant 
also  proper. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

NEWMILLS,  The  Company  of  Cloth  Manufactory  at.  Refer  to  Cloth 
Manufactory. 

NEWMILNES  AND  GREENHOLM.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  in 
use  are  per  chevron  azure  and  argent,  in  chief  a  sword  erect,  supporting  on  the 
point  a  pair  of  scales,  on  the  dexter  side  a  spindle,  on  the  sinister  a  shuttle,  in 
base  a  representation  of  the  old  Council  House.  Crest — A  beehive.  Motto 
— "  Weave  truth  with  trust."  [This  motto  was  formerly  the  motto  of  the  old 
Guild  of  Weavers.] 
[Of  no  authority.] 

NEWPORT  (Fifeshire).  Has  no  arms.  Those  in  use  are  argent,  on  waves  of  the 
sea  in  base  an  ancient  lymphad,  on  the  sail  the  mounted  warrior  which  was  the 
crest  of  the  Earls  Fife,  in  the  stern  of  the  ship  the  figure  of  Hygeia  seated,  holding 
in  her  dexter  hand  a  cup  from  which  a  serpent  is  drinking.  Aloito — "  Hygea  duce." 

NEWPORT  (Isle  of  Wight).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  an 
ancient  one-masted  ship  at  sea,  with  the  legend  "  Sigillurn  comune  ville  de 
Neuport  in  Insula  de  Wight." 

NEWPORT  (Monmouthshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  an 
escutcheon,  "...  charged  with  a  chevron  reversed  or."  The  Corporation  note- 
paper  shows  it"  Azure,  a  chevron  reversed  or,"  and  the  Town-Clerk,  writing,  informs 
the  editor  that  the  arms  are,  "  Or,  chevron  gules  reversed,"  adding  a  note,  "  The 
Arms  are  stated  to  be  the  same  as  those  of  the  Duke  of  Buckingham,  who  was 
Lord  of  Newport  in  Richard's  the  Third's  time,  but  with  the  chevron  reversed." 
All  representations  of  the  arms  (on  the  seal  and  elsewhere)  are  surmounted  by 
a  cherub  with  wings  expanded  and  inverted,  but  with  no  wreath.  It  seems  a 
pity  somebody  doesn't  interest  himself  in  the  matter,  and  get  arms  granted  to 
the  town,  and  thus  secure  some  uniformity  and  some  authoritative  accuracy. 

NEWPORT  (Shropshire).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

NEWRY  (Cos.  Down  and  Armagh).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in 
Ulster's  Office.  The  seal  represents  on  a  mount  a  bishop  enthroned,  his  right 
hand  raised  in  the  act  of  benediction,  and  with  his  sinister  supporting  his  cross, 
all  between  two  poplar  (?)  trees  growing  out  of  the  mount.  This  has  frequently 
been  treated  and  quoted  as  a  coat-of-arms. 

NEWTON  (Lancashire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  but  the  seal  represents  a 
ram's  head  issuing  from  a  ducal  coronet,  and  holding  in  its  mouth  a  sprig  of 
laurel  all  proper.  Within  the  legend,  "  Sigillum  burgi  ac  leti  de  Newton." 
This  is  quoted  in  Burke's  "  General  Armory  "  as  the  crest  of  Newton,  but  it  is 
really  the  crest  of  the  old  family  of  Legh,  formerly  resident  there. 

552 


NEWFOUNDLAND,  SEE  OF 


NEWPORT  (MONMOUTHSHIRE) 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
NEWTON-STEWART.     Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 

NEWTOWN  or  FRANVILLE  (Hants).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal, 
which  is  very  ancient,  represents  an  antique  ship  on  the  sea  with  one  mast,  sail 
furled  and  pennon  flying  ;  on  the  ship  a  lion  passant  guardant,  in  chief  on  the 
dexter  a  mullet,  and  on  the  sinister  a  crescent ;  in  fesse  on  the  sinister  side  an 
escutcheon  of  St  George. 

NEWTOWN  (Montgomeryshire).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

NIAGARA,  See  of  (Canada).  Tierced  in  fesse  in  chief  a  representation  of  Niagara 
Falls  ;  in  fesse  argent,  a  cross  gules  ;  in  base  vert,  three  maple  leaves  conjoined 
proper. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

NICARAGUA.     Refer  to  Illustration. 

NICE  (France).  Argent,  an  eagle  displayed  gules,  crowned  or,  its  claws  resting  on 
mountains  vert,  issuing  from  the  sea  in  base  proper. 

NIGER  DISTRICT,  See  of.     A  landscape  in  base,  to  the  dexter  a  rock  thereon  a 
palm-tree,  on  the  sea  out  of  which  the  sun  is  rising,  a  ship  in  full  sail  all  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

NIJNI-NOVGOROD  (Russia).  Argent,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert,  a  stag  trippant, 
gules. 

NORFOLK,  County  of.  Per  pale  or  and  sable,  a  bend  ermine,  on  a  chief  gules,  a 
lion  passant  guardant  of  the  first  between  two  ostrich  plumes  argent  quilled 
and  each  ensigned  with  a  Prince's  Coronet  of  the  first  and  transpiercing  a  label 
proper,  thereon  the  Motto — "  Ich  Dien "  as  borne  on  the  banner  of  King 
Edward  III. 

The  arms  of  the  County  of  Norfolk  are  quite  unique,  chiefly  by  reason  of 
the  fact  that  as  a  mark  of  special  favour  they  were  granted  by  King  Edward 
VII.  by  Royal  Warrant.  For  this  reason  the  Documents  by  which  the  grant 
was  effected  are  set  out  in  full. 

Edward  R.  and  I. 

Edward  the  Seventh  by  the  Grace  of  God  of  the  United  Kingdom  of 
Great  Britain  and  Ireland  and  of  the  British  Dominions  beyond  the  Seas,  King, 
Defender  of  the  Faith :  To  Our  Right  Trusty  and  Right  Entirely  beloved 
Cousin  and  Councillor,  Henry  Duke  of  Norfolk,  Earl  Marshal  and  Our 
Hereditary  Marshal  of  England,  Knight  of  Our  Most  Noble  Order  of  the 
Garter,  Knight  Grand  Cross  of  Our  Victorian  Order,  Greeting.  WHEREAS  Sir 
William  Hovell  Browne  Ffolkes  of  Hillington  in  the  County  of  Norfolk, 
Baronet,  Chairman  of  the  County  Council  of  Norfolk,  hath  by  his  Petition 
humbly  represented  unto  Us,  That  by  virtue  of  an  Act  of  Parliament  passed  in 

554 


NIAGARA,  SEE  OF 


NIGER  DISTRICT,  SEE  OF 


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NIJNI-NOVGOROD 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

the  year  One  thousand  eight  hundred  and  eighty-eight  to  amend  the  Laws 
relating  to  Local  Government  in  England  and  Wales  and  for  other  purposes 
connected  therewith,  it  is  Enacted  that  a  Council  shall  be  established  in  every 
Administrative  County  as  defined  in  the  said  Act,  and  be  entrusted  with  the 
management  of  the  Administrative  and  Financial  business  of  that  County,  and 
shall  consist  of  a  Chairman,  Aldermen  and  Councillors,  and  that  the  Council  of 
each  County  shall  be  a  Body  Corporate  by  the  name  of  the  Administrative 
County  and  shall  have  perpetual  succession  and  a  Common  Seal  and  power  to 
acquire  and  hold  Land  for  the  purposes  of  their  Constitution  without  Licence  in 
Mortmain:  And  it  being  provided  in  and  by  the  said  Act  that  the  said  Bodies 
Politic  and  Corporate  shall  have  perpetual  succession  and  Common  Seals,  and 
the  said  Sir  William  Hovell  Browne  Ffolkes,  Baronet,  as  Chairman  of  the 
County  Council  of  Norfolk,  therefore  most  humbly  prays  Our  Royal  Licence 
and  Authority  that  the  said  County  Council  may  bear  and  use  certain  Armorial 
Ensigns  in  Commemoration  of  Our  long  residence  in  the  said  County  of  Norfolk 
on  a  Common  Seal,  Shields,  Banners  or  otherwise  according  to  the  Laws  of 
Arms  :  Know  ye  that  We  of  Our  Princely  Grace  and  Special  Favour  have 
given  and  granted  and  by  these  Presents  do  give  and  grant  unto  the  said  County 
Council  of  Norfolk  Our  Royal  Licence  and  Authority  to  bear  on  their  Common 
Seal,  Shields,  Banners  or  otherwise  according  to  the  Laws  of  Arms,  viz. 
"  A  bend  and  on  a  chief  a  Lion  passant  guardant  between  two  Ostrich  Plumes, 
each  ensigned  with  a  Prince's  Coronet  and  transpiercing  a  Label,  thereon  the 
Motto  '  Ich  Dien  '  as  borne  on  the  Banner  of  King  Edward  the  Third,"  the 
whole  as  in  the  drawing  hereunto  annexed,  the  same  being  first  duly  exemplified 
and  recorded  in  Our  College  of  Arms,  otherwise  this  Our  Royal  Licence  and 
permission  to  be  void  and  of  none  effect  :^ 

Our  Will  and  Pleasure  therefore  is  that  you,  Henry  Duke  of  Norfolk,  to 
whom  the  cognizance  of  Matters  of  this  nature  doth  properly  belong,  do  require 
and  command  that  this  Our  Concession  and  Especial  Mark  of  Our  Royal 
Favour  be  registered  in  Our  College  of  Arms,  to  the  end  that  Our  Officers  of 
Arms  and  all  others  upon  occasion  may  take  full  notice*  and  have  knowledge 
thereof:  and  for  so  doing  this  shall  be  your  Warrant.  GIVEN  at  Our  Court  at 
Saint  James's  this  eleventh  day  of  May  1904,  in  the  Fourth  year  of  Our  Reign  : — 
By  His  Majesty's  Command, 

A.  Akers  Douglas. 

Whereas  His  Majesty  by  Warrant  under  his  Royal  Signet  and  Sign 
Manual,  bearing  date  the  eleventh  day  of  May  last,  hath  signified  unto  me  that 
he  has  been  graciously  pleased  to  give  and  grant  unto  the  County  Council  of 
Norfolk  his  Royal  Licence  and  Authority  to  bear  on  their  Common  Seal, 
Shields,  Banners,  or  otherwise  according  to  the  Laws  of  Arms  following,  vizt.,"  A 
bend  and  on  a  chief  a  Lion  passant  guardant  between  two  Ostrich  Plumes,  each 
ensigned  with  a  Prince's  Coronet  and  transpiercing  a  Label,  thereon  the  Motto 
'Ich  Dien'  as  borne  on  the  Banner  of  King  Edward  the  Third,"  the  same 
being  first  duly  exemplified  and  recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms,  otherwise  the 

556 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

said  Royal  Licence  and  permission  to  be  void  and  of  none  effect.  And  also 
signified  unto  me  His  Royal  Will  and  Pleasure  that  the  said  Royal  Concession 
and  Especial  Mark  of  Royal  Favour  be  registered  in  the  said  College  of  Arms : — 
I.  Henry  Duke  of  Norfolk,  Earl  Marshal  and  Hereditary  Marshal  of 
England,  Knight  of  the  Most  Noble  Order  of  tha  Garter,  Knight  Grand  Cross 
of  the  Royal  Victorian  Order,  and  one  of  his  Majesty's  Most  Honourable  Privy 
Council,  do  hereby  authorise  and  require  you  to  cause  the  said  Royal  Warrant 
and  these  Presents  to  be  recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms  accordingly, 
and  further  that  j'ou  Garter,  Ciarenceux,  and  Norroy  do  grant  and  exemplify 
unto  the  said  County  Council  of  Norfolk  such  Arms  accordingly,  pursuant  to 
the  tenor  of  the  said  Royal  Warrant  and  according  to  the  Laws  of  Arms,  For 
which  this  shall  be  your  Warrant  :  GIVEN  under  my  hand  and  seal  this  fourth 
day  of  June  1904.  Norfolk,  E.  M. 

To  Garter  Principal  King  of  Arms, 

Ciarenceux  King  of  Arms,  Norroy  King  of  Arms, 

and  the  other  Officers  of  the  College  of  Arms. 

To  All  and  Singular  to  whom  these  Presents  shall  come,  Alfred  Scott 
Scott-Gatty,  Esquire,  Garter  Principal  King  of  Arms,  George  Edward  Cokayne, 
Esquire,  Ciarenceux  King  of  Arms,  and  William  Henry  Weldon,  Esquire, 
Commander  of  the  Royal  Victorian  Order,  Norroy  King  of  Arms,  Send  Greeting. 
Whereas  His  Majesty  by  Warrant  under  his  Royal  Signet  and  Sign  Manual, 
bearing  date  the  eleventh  day  of  May,  hath  signified  unto  the  Most  Noble 
Henry  Duke  of  Norfolk,  Earl  Marshal  and  Hereditary  Marshal  of  England, 
Knight  of  the  Most  Noble  Order  of  the  Garter,  Knight  Grand  Cross  of  the  Royal 
Victorian  Order,  and  one  of  His  Majesty's  Most  Honourable  Privy  Council, 
that  he  has  been  graciously  pleased  to  give  and  grant  unto  the  County  Council  of 
Norfolk,  his  Royal  Licence  and  Authority  to  bear  on  their  Common  Seal, 
Shields,  Banners,  or  otherwise  according  to  the  Laws  of  Arms,  the  Arms 
following,  vizt.  "  A  bend  and  on  a  chief  a  Lion  passant  guardant  between  two 
Ostrich  Plumes,  each  ensigned  with  a  Prince's  Coronet  and  transpiercing  a 
Label,  thereon  the  Motto  '  Ich  Dien'  as  borne  on  the  Banner  of  King  Edward 
the  Third,"  the  same  being  first  duly  exemplified  and  recorded  in  the  College  ol 
Arms,  otherwise  the  said  Royal  Licence  and  permission  to  be  void  and  of  none 
effect,  AND  forasmuch  as  the  said  Earl  Marshal  did  by  Warrant  under  his  hand 
and  seal,  bearing  date  the  fourth  day  of  June  following,  authorise  and  direct  us 
to  grant  and  exemplify  such  Arms  accordingly,  KNOW  YE  therefore  that  we,  the 
said  Garter,  Ciarenceux,  and  Norroy,  in  obedience  to  the  Royal  Command  in 
pursuance  of  His  Grace's  Warrant,  and  by  virtue  of  the  Letters  Patent  of  Our 
several  Offices  to  each  of  us  respectively  granted,  do  by  these  Presents  grant 
and  exemplify  unto  the  said  County  Council  of  Norfolk  the  Arms  following,  that 
is  to  say  Per  Pale  Or  and  Sable  a  Bend  Ermine,  on  a  Chief  Gules  a  Lion 
passantguardant  of  the  first  between  two  Ostrich  Plumes  Argent  quilled,  and  each 
ensigned  with  a  Prince's  Coronet  of  the  first  and  transpiercing  a  Label  proper, 
thereon  the  Motto  "  Ich  Dien  "  as  borne  on  the  Banner  ot   King  Edward  the 

557 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

Third,  as  the  same  are  in  the  margin  hereof  more  plainly  depicted,  to  be  borne 
and  used  for  ever  hereafter  by  the  said  County  Council  of  Norfolk  on  their 
Common  Seal,  Shields,  Banners,  or  otherwise  pursuant  to  the  tenor  of  the  said 
Royal  Warrant  and  according  to  the  Laws  of  Arms : 

In  witness  whereof  We,  the  said  Garter,  Clarenceux,  and  Norroy  Kings  of 
Arms  have  to  these  Presents  subscribed  our  names  and  affixed  the  Seals  of 
our  several  Offices  this  third  day  of  July  in  the  Fourth  year  of  the  Reign  of 
our  Sovereign  Lord  Edward  the  Seventh,  by  the  Grace  of  God  of  the  United 
Kingdom  of  Great  Britain  and  Ireland  and  of  the  British  Dominions  beyond  the 
Seas,  King,  Defender  of  the  Faith,  etc.,  and  in  the  year  of  Lord  Our  One 
Thousand  nine  hundred  and  four. 

A.  S.  Scott-Gatty,  G.  E.  Cokayne,  William  H.  Weldon, 

Garter.  Clarenceux.  Norroy. 

NORROY  KING  OF  ARMS.  Argent,  a  cross  gules,  on  a  chief  of  the  second,  a 
lion  passant  guardant  crowned  of  the  first  between  a  fleur-de-lis  on  the  dexter 
and  a  key  on  the  sinister  of  the  last. 

[These  arms  of  office  are  either  borne  alone  or  impaled  on  the  dexter  side 
of  the  personal  arms  of  Norroy.  The  escutcheon  is  surmounted  by  his  official 
crown.] 


558 


1  ^^    't.      'n-       # 


NORFOLK 


NORROY  KING  OF  ARMS 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

NORTH  AMERICAN  COLONIAL  ASSOCIATION.  Quarterly,  ist,  argent,  a 
ship  of  three  masts  on  the  sea,  in  full  sail  proper  ;  2nd,  on  a  mount  a  beaver,  and 
in  the  distance  a  forest,  all  proper;  3rd,  gules,  a  plough  or  ;  4th,  azure  a  garb  or. 
On  an  escocheon  in  centre  point  argent  a  trefoil  slipped  vert  royal  crowned  of 
England  proper.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours  an  Irish  wolf  dog  couchant 
proper.  Supporters — (Dexter)  an  Irish  peasant  habited,  jacket  azure,  trousers 
argent,  his  hat  of  straw,  holding  over  his  dexter  shoulder  a  felling  axe  proper  ; 
(sinister)  a  similar  figure  of  an  Irishman  holding  in  his  left  hand  a  reaping-hook 
or  sickle  proper.     Motto — "  Magnum  vectigal  industris." 

[Granted,  6th  October  1S35,  by  Sir  William  Betham,  Ulster.] 

NORTH  BERWICK  (Haddingtonshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial 
bearings.  The  seal  represents  an  ancient  galley  upon  the  sea,  with  sail  furled, 
and  therein  seated  four  men  rowing.  Above  is  the  motto,  "  Victoria  gloria 
merces,"  all  within  the  legend  "  Sigillum  burgi  de  North  Berwick." 

NORTH  CHINA,  See  of.     Gules,  a  cross  moline  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

NORTH  LONDON  OR  UNIVERSITY  COLLEGE  HOSPITAL.  Refer  to 
University  College  Hospital. 

NORTH  OF  SCOTLAND  BANKING  COMPANY.  Chequy  or  and  azure,  a  saltire 
between  three  towers  triple  towered,  one  in  chief  and  two  in  the  flanks  argent. 
In  an  escrol  above  the  shield  is  placed  this  Motto — "  Ne  Nimium." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon   Register,   iSth  July  1863.     This  Company  is  now 
incorporated  as  below.] 

NORTH  OF  SCOTLAND  AND  TOWN  AND  COUNTY  BANK,  LTD. 
(North  of  Scotland  Banking  Company  and  Aberdeen  Town  and  County 
Banking  Company,  amalgamated  April  30,  1908.)  Quarterly :  i  and  4 
chequy  or  and  azure,  a  saltire  between  three  towers  triple-towered,  one  in  chief 
and  two  in  flanks  argent,  masoned  sable ;  2  and  3,  gules,  a  bezant  between  two 
towers  triple-towered  argent,  masoned  as  before  in  chief  and  a  garb  or  in  base. 
And  on  an  escrol  above  the  shield  this  Motto — "  Ne  nimium  "  ;  and  on  a  compart- 
ment below  the  shield  bearing  this  Motto — "Fide  et  Industria,"  are  set  for 
Supporters — On  the  dexter  a  leopard  and  on  the  sinister  a  stag,  both  proper. 
[Rematriculated  in  Lyon  Office,  May  20,  190S.] 

NORTH  QUEENSLAND,  See  of  (Australia).     Azure,  a  Paschal  lamb  proper, 
between  three  cross  crosslets  fitchee  argent. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

NORTH  RIDING  of  the  County  of  Yorkshire.     See  Yorkshire. 

NORTH  SHIELDS  (Northumberland).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

560 


NORTH  CHINA,  SEE  OF 


NORTH  QUEENSLAND,  SEE  OF 


NORTH  OF  SCOTLAND  AND  TOWN  AND  COUNTY  BANK,  LTD. 


2  N 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

NORTH-WEST  TERRITORIES  (Province,  Dominion  of  Canada).  No  warrant 
assigning  any  arms  has  ever  been  issued  either  for  the  Province  or  for  the 
districts  of  Assiniboia,  Athabasca,  Keewatin,  Yukon,  Mackenzie,  Ungava,  or 
Franklin,  which  now  make  up  the  Province. 

NORTHALLERTON  (Yorkshire).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

NORTHAMPTONSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  arms  of  the  town  of 
Northampton  have  frequently  been  used  in  lieu  of  county  insignia,  but  an  old 
seal  formerly  used  for  county  purposes  has  an  heraldic  rose  within  the  legend 
"  Northampton."  The  seal  of  the  County  Council  has  adopted  the  same  design 
of  the  rose  within  the  legend  "County  Council  of  Northamptonshire,  1889." 

NORTHAMPTON  (Northamptonshire).  Gules,  on  a  mount  vert,  a  tower  triple 
towered  in  a  pyramidical  form  argent,  and  supported  by  two  lions  rampant 
guardant  or,  in  the  portway  of  the  tower  a  portcullis.  Recorded  in  the  College 
of  Arms.     Motto — "  Castello  fortior  concordia." 

NORTHERN  NIGERIA.  No  warrant  assigning  arms  has  as  yet  been  issued  to 
Northern  Nigeria. 

NORTHUMBERLAND.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  arms  attributed  to 
Northumbria  were  paly  of  eight  or  and  gules.  Travesties,  many  of  them  very 
wide  of  the  mark,  upon  the  arms  of  Morpeth,  have  done  duty  on  various 
occasions,  but  for  accuracy  it  has  been  left  to  the  seal  of  the  Northumberland 
County  Council  to  bear  away  the  palm.  The  seal  shows  seven  escutcheons, 
supposed  or  intended  to  represent  respectively  the  arms  of  Northumbria, 
Berwick,  Morpeth,  Tynemouth,  Corbridge,  Hexham,  and  Alnwick.  Of  the  seven, 
Morpeth  alone  is  the  only  genuine  coat-of-arms.     Need  more  be  said  ? 

NORTON.     See  Chipping  Norton. 

NORWAY,  Kingdom  of.  Gules,  a  lion  rampant  crowned  or,  holding  a  long-handled 
Danish  axe  argent.  Supporters — Two  lions  rampant  regardant  double  queued 
or,  langued  gules. 


562 


NORTHAMPTON 


NORWAY 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

NORWICH,  City  of  (Norfolk).  Gules,  a  castle  domed  argent,  in  base  a  lion  passant 
guardant  or. 

[Confirmed  by  Hervey,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms.] 

Upon  the  Town-Clerk's  notepaper  the  arms  are  surmounted  by  a  fur 
cap,  and  are  supported  by  two  angels,  with  wings  inverted,  holding  over  the 
interior  shoulder  a  sword  point  upwards,  and  each  standing  upon  a  little  pile 
of  clouds.  On  a  carving  of  the  City  Arms  outside  the  Guildhall,  Norwich, 
which  is  stated  to  date  from  1534,  the  arms  are  surmounted  by  a  repre- 
sentation of  the  fur  cap  (formerly,  at  Norwich,  worn  by  the  Mayor)  and  are 
accompanied  by  figures  of  two  angels.  Whether  or  not  these  figures  were  then 
intended  for  heraldic  supporters  is  a  matter  of  dispute.  At  any  rate,  there  is  no 
official  authority  for  their  use. 

NORWICH,  See  of     Azure,  three  mitres  labelled  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 
These  arms  first  appear  in  1 531,  on  the  seal  of  Bishop  William  Bateman. 

NORWICH,  Dean  of.     Argent,  a  cross  sable. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

NOTTINGHAMSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  County 
Council,  however,  exhibits  these  arms,  "  Quarterly  argent  and  or,  on  a  cross 
raguly  gules  between  in  the  first  quarter,  a  tree  eradicated,  in  the  second,  a  pick- 
axe and  spade  in  saltire,  handles  downwards,  and  pendent  therefrom  a  safety- 
lamp,  in  the  third  quarter,  a  representation  of  a  lace-making  machine  (?),  and  in 
the  fourth  quarter  a  garb,  all  proper,  a  ducal  coronet  of  the  second. 


564 


NORWICH,  CITY  OF 


NORWICH,  SEE  OF 


NORWICH,  DEAN  OF 


NOTTINGHAMSHIRE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

NOTTINGHAM,  City  of.  Gules,  issuant  from  the  base,  a  ragged  cross  couped 
proper  {i.e.  vert)  between  two  ducal  coronets  in  chief  or,  and  the  lower  limb  of 
the  cross  enfiled  with  a  like  coronet.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours  (or  and 
gules),  a  castle  walled,  triple-towered  and  domed  proper,  the  dome  of  the  dexter 
tower  surmounted  by  an  increscent  argent,  and  the  sinister  by  an  estoile,  or. 
Supporters — On  either  side,  standing  on  a  staff  raguly  erased,  a  royal  stag 
guardant  proper,  ducally  gorged  or.     Motto — "  Vivit  post  funera  virtus." 

The  arms  were  recorded  at  the  visitation  of  Nottingham,  1614.  The  crest 
was  granted  by  Sir  Albert  Woods,  Garter,  G.  E.  Cokayne,  Clarenceux,  and 
William  H.  Weldon,  Norro)',  by  patent,  loth  June  1898  (printed  in  the  Genea- 
logical Magaziiie,  vol.  ii.  p.  431).  On  the  following  day  a  grant  of  supporters 
("  on  either  side  a  man  habited  as  a  Forester,  each  supporting  in  his  exterior 
hand  a  long  bow  bent  all  proper")  was  made  by  Sir  Albert  Woods  (patent 
printed  in  Genealogical  Magazine,  vol.  ii.  p.  388),  but  these  supporters  have  been 
discarded  and  those  given  above  granted  in  their  place.  The  motto  dates  from 
the  early  part  of  the  i8th  century. 

By  patent,  dated  November  7,  191 1,  a  Standard  was  granted  to  the  City 
of  Nottingham.  This  has  upon  a  field  barry  of  six  or  and  argent  {inter  alia) 
a  Badge,  viz.,  a  saltire  raguly  vert,  surmounted  by  a  royal  stag's  head  caboshed 
proper. 

NOTTINGHAM     HIGH    SCHOOL.     On    a   lozenge    argent    three    blackbirds 
rising  sable.     Motto — "  Lauda  finem." 

[Of  no  authority,  being  the  arms  of  Dame  Agnes  Mellers,  the  foundress.] 


566 


NOTTINGHAM,  CITY  OF 


NOTTINGHAM  HIGH  SCHOOL 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

NOVA  SCOTIA  (Province  of  Dominion  of  Canada).  Or,  on  a  fesse  wavy  azure, 
between  three  thistles  proper,  a  salmon  naiant  argent. 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  1869.] 

These  are  the  arms  which  are  now  made  use  of,  both  alone  as  above  for  the 
Province  and  as  a  quartering  therefor  on  the  shield  of  the  Dominion,  but  there  is 
a  much  older  coat  of  equal  authenticity.  No  record  exists  of  the  grant,  but  it  is 
recited  in  all  the  patents  of  Nova  Scotian  baronets  issued  by  King  Charles  I.  prior 
to  the  year  1629,  that  "the  baronets  and  their  heirs  male  should  as  an  addition 
of  honour  to  their  armorial  ensigns,  bear,  either  on  a  canton,  or  inescutcheon,  at 
their  option,  the  ensign  of  Nova  Scotia,  being  "argent,  a  cross  of  St  Andrew 
azure,  charged  with  an  inescocheon  of  the  royal  arms  of  Scotland  ;  supported  on 
the  dexter  by  the  Royal  Unicorn  and  on  the  sinister  by  a  savage  or  wild  man 
proper,  and  for  the  crest,  a  branch  of  laurel  and  a  thistle,  issuing  from  two  hands 
conjoined,  the  one  being  armed  and  the  other  naked  ;  with  this  Motto  "  Munit 
hcEC  et  altera  vincit."  Between  the  years  1805- 10  (the  actual  entry  is  undated) 
the  arms  were  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register  as  follows :  "  Argent,  on  a  saltire 
azure,  an  escutcheon  of  the  Royal  Arms  of  Scotland,  supported  on  the  dexter  by 
the  Royal  Unicorn  and  on  the  sinister  by  a  savage  proper." 

In  this  the  supporters  would  appear  to  be  attached  to  the  shield  for 
Scotland  and  superimposed  upon  the  outer  shield  itself  I  fancy  this  is  due  to 
a  misreading  of  the  description  of  the  arms  in  the  Baronetcy  patents,  but  at  the 
same  time  the  arms  of  Gordon-Cumming  afford  another  instance  of  supporters 
to  an  inner  shield  appearing  as  a  charge  on  a  larger  shield.  Why  these  arms 
were  overlooked  and  other  arms  assigned  in  1869  is  incomprehensible,  and 
much  to  be  regretted. 

The  province  of  Ontario  has  recently  obtained  a  further  warrant  assigning 
a  crest  and  supporters  to  the  arms  as  assigned  in  1869,  and  I  suggest  that 
Nova  Scotia  should  also  take  steps  to  procure  a  further  warrant,  which  should 
add  the  old  crest  and  supporters  to  the  shield  and  conjoin  the  new  and  the  old 
arms  of  the  province. 

NOVA  SCOTIA,  See  of.     Or,  a  paschal  lamb  proper,  bearing  a  flag  azure,  charged 
■  with  a  saltire  argent,  on  a  chief  also  azure,  a  pastoral  staff  and  a  key  in  saltire 
of  the  first. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

NOVGOROD.     Refer  to  Nijni-Novgorod. 


568 


^(^^ 


HISTORIC 
NOVA  SCOTIA 


I 


"^^^m^ 


lacmorial  iacbicbement  of  J^oba  S>cotia 
(©rantcb  fap  iLing  Cljarles  I, 
(n  1625. 


PUBLISHED    BY 

GOVERNMENT   OF    NOVA   SCOTIA 


ORDER  OF  THE  GOOD  TIME 
NOVA  SCOTIA 


HERE    IS    YOUR   OPPORTUNITY  TO  JOIN 
THE  OLDEST  SOCIAL  CLUB  IN  AMERICA 


You  are  cordially  invited  to  join  the  Order  of  The 
Good  Time,  Nova  Scotia,  when  you  visit  the  province  this 
year. 

This  order  was  founded  by  Champlain  at  Port  Royal 
(now  Annapolis  Royal)  Nova  Scotia,  in  1606.  It  was  es- 
tablished to  keep  alive  the  spirit  of  fellowship  and  good 
cheer  amongst  the  early  French  pioneers,  and  that  spirit 
has  been  maintained  down  through  the  years  in  Nova 
Scotia. 

To  qualify,  register  at  one  of  the  Government  Informa- 
tion Bureaus  on  arrival,  stay  in  the  Province  ten  days  or 
more,  and  then  register  again.  You  will  thereupon  be 
welcomed  mto  the  Order  and  receive  the  certificate  of 
membership.  There  will  be  no  initiation  fee  nor  any 
annual  dues  to  pay- 
When  you  join  the  Order  of  The  Good  Time,  you  be- 
come a  member  of  the  oldest  social  club  in  America. 


t^^,^     PH^t-A.X^-'^.-.tt-^ 


Ql:^    Ul^j^JXUOjLax^ 


MI5TGR  OF  HIOMWAVS 


IIJII/III/IIIIII>  lli''liiiiniiiii,,,niiiiiiiniitiutniiiiinil)lllinll)>>i^f^^[ 


NOVA  SCOTIA 


NOVA  SCOTIA,  SEE  OF 


THE   ROOK   OF    I'l   IlLIC   ARMS 

NUREMBURG,    or    NURNBERG    (Germany).       An    eagle    of    the    German 

Empire  charged  on  the  brcaat  with  tlie  impaled  arms  of  Castile  and  Austria, 
supporting  two  shields,  the  dexter  (the  seal  device  of  the  old  Imperial  city) 
"  a/.ure,  a  harpy  (' frauenadler ')  displayed  and  crowned  or,"  the  sinister  (the 
real  arms  of  Nuremburg)  'per  pale  or,  a  double-headed  eagle  displayed, 
dimidiated  with  bendy  of  six  gules  and  argent." 

I  The  illustration   is  taken   from   the  title-page  of  the   German   edition   of 
Andreas  Vesili's  "  Anatomia,"  printed  at  Niirenberg,  1537.  | 

NYASALAND,  See  of.      Azure,  a  cross  argent  between  four  fountains. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

OAKHAM  (Rutland).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  But  the  following  are  regularly 
used  and  quoted,  "  Or,  a  horse-shoe  sable,  nailed  argent."  The  old  legend  is  that 
when  passing  through  the  town  Queen  Elizabeth's  horse  lost  a  shoe,  and  the 
town  thereupon  acquired  the  privilege  of  claiming  a  horse-shoe  from  an\-  royal 
personage  or  nobleman  entering  its  precincts. 

OAKHAMPTON  (Devonshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  but  Burke's  "  General 
.\rmor\-  "  i|uotes  as  follows  :   "  Chequy  or  and  az.  two  bars  ar.      6/f.sV — .A  castle." 

OAKINGHAM.     See  Wokingham. 


57° 


NURNBERG 


NYASALAND,  SEE  OF 


OAKHAM 


OAKHAMPTON 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

OBAN,  Burgh  of.     Argent,  in  the  waves  of  the  sea  proper,  a  lymphad  sable,  oars 
in  action  with  a  beacon  on  the  top  of  the  mast  proper,  in  base  a  salmon  naiant 
argent,  on  a  chief  parted  per  pale  dexter  azure,  a  lion  rampant  argent,  sinister 
gyronny  of  eight  or  and  sable.     Motto — "  Air  aghart." 
[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  31st  May  1901.] 

ODESSA  (Russia).  Azure,  a  Patriarch's  cross  argent,  between  three  Imperial 
Russian  crowns  or. 

OFFICE  OF  JESTS,  REVELS,  AND  MASQUES,  of  our  Lord  the  King  in 
Ireland.  Azure,  a  harp  or,  stringed  argent,  on  a  chief  of  the  last  three  garlands 
of  leaves  vert,  tied  gules. 

[Granted  by  Thomas  Preston,  Ulster  King  of  Arms,  July  2,  1638.] 

OKEHAMPTON.     See  Oakhampton. 

OKINGHAM.     See  Wokingham. 

OLDENBORG.     Refer  to  Denmark. 

OLDENBURG  (Germany).  Quarterly  i  and  4  or,  two  bars  gules,  2  and  3 
azure,  a  cross  urdee  or,  on  an  inescutcheon  sable,  a  lion  rampant  or. 

OLDENBURG,  Grand  Duchy  of.  Quarterly:  i  gules,  a  lion  rampant  or 
supporting  with  his  paws  a  long-handled  battle-axe  (Norway) ;  2  or,  two  lions 
passant  in  pale  azure  (Schleswig) ;  3  gules,  an  inescutcheon  per  fesse  argent 
and  of  the  field  within  three  nettle-leaves  and  as  many  passion  nails  alternately 
disposed  in  orle  (Holstein);  4  gules,  a  swan  with  wings  displayed  argent,  beaked 
and  legged  sable,  gorged  with  a  crown  or  (Stormarn)  ;  5  gules,  a  knight  in  com- 
plete armour,  gold  mounted,  on  ahorse  at  full  speed  argent,  brandishing  a  sword 
(Dithmarschen) ;  6  or,  a  lion  rampant  sable  crowned  or  (Kniphausen);  over  all 
an  inescutcheon  crowned,  and  quarterly:  i  or,  two  bars  gules  (Oldenburg); 
2  azure,  a  cross  patee  alesee  or  (Delmenhorst);  3  azure,  a  cross  patee  or 
surmounted  by  a  mitre  argent  (Lubeck) ;  4  chequy  gules  and  argent 
(Birkenfeld) ;  5  (in  point)  azure,  a  lion  rampant  and  crowned  or  (Jever). 


572 


ODESSA 


OBAN 


OLDENBURG  (GERMANY) 


OLDENBURG,  GRAND  DUCHY  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

OLDHAM,  Borough  of  (Lancashire).  Sable,  a  chevron  invected  plain  cottised 
or,  between  three  owls  argent,  on  a  chief  engrailed  of  the  second,  a  rose  gules 
barbed  and  seeded  proper  between  two  annulets  also  gules.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  in  front  of  a  rock  thereon  an  owl  argent,  three  roses 
fessewise  gules,  barbed  and  seeded  proper.  Motto — "  Sapere  aude." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  7th  November  1894.] 

OLD  MELDRUM.  Has  no  arms  but  borrows  the  entire  achievement  of  Urquhart 
of  Meldrum,  viz.,  "  Or,  three  boars'  heads  gules."  Crest — A  demi-otter  crowned 
with  an  antique  crown  and  holding  between  its  paws  a  crescent.  Mottoes — (Over 
crest)  "  Per  mare  per  terras  "  ;  (under  arms)  "  Mean,  speak  and  doe  well."  Sup- 
porters— Two  greyhounds  proper,  collared  gules,  leashed  or. 

OLMUTZ  (Germany).  Azure,  an  eagle  displayed  chequy  argent  and  gules, 
crowned  or,  on  its  breast  an  inescutcheon  gules  charged  with  a  fesse  argent, 
thereon  the  letters  F.  M.  T. 


574 


OLMUTZ 


OLDHAM 


OLD  MELDRUM 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ONTARIO  (Province  of,  Dominion  of  Canada).  Vert,  a  sprig  of  three  leaves  of 
maple  slipped  or,  on  a  chief  argent,  the  cross  of  St  George.  Crest — On  a  wreath 
of  the  colours,  a  bear  passant  sable.  Siipporters — (Dexter)  a  moose,  (sinister)  a 
Canadian  deer,  both  proper.     Motto — "  Ut  incepit  fidelis  sic  permanet." 

[Thearms  were  assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  1869,  and  the  crest,  supporters, 
and  motto  by  Royal  Warrant,  27th  February  1909.] 

ONTARIO,  See  of  (Canada).     Argent,  on  a  cross  gules,  an  open  book  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

OPORTO  (Portugal).  Quarterly  i  and  4  the  Royal  arms  of  Portugal  {q.v) 
2  and  3  in  a  landscape,  the  Virgin  and  Child  standing  between  two  towers, 
issuant  from  each  an  arm  brandishing  a  sword  ;  over  all  on  an  inescutcheon 
gules,  a  human  heart  or,  inflamed  proper. 


576 


ONTARfO 


OPORTO 


ONTARIO,  SEE  OF 


20 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ORANGE   FREE   STATE,   Province   of  the   (Union  of  South  Africa).      Or, 
upon  an  island,  an  orange  tree  vert,  fructed  proper. 
[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  4th  May  191 1.] 

ORANGE  RIVER  COLONY  (South  Africa).  "  Argent,  on  a  mount,  a  spring- 
buck, and  on  a  chief  azure,  the  Imperial  Crown  all  proper." 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant.  As  the  Orange  River  Free  State  the  badge 
or  device  of  an  orange  tree  appeared  on  its  postage  stamps,  and  this  survives  in 
the  arms  recently  assigned  to  the  Union  of  South  Africa.  Refer  also  to  Union 
of  South  Africa.  The  device  published  by  the  Admiralty  for  use  by  the 
Governor  on  the  Union  flag  is  a  landscape  disc  thereon  (?  a  gemsbok).] 

ORDNANCE  OFFICE  or  BOARD  OF  ORDNANCE.     Azure,  three  field-pieces 
on  their  carriages  in  pale  or,  on  a  chief  argent  as  many  cannon-balls  sable. 
[College  of  Arms.     Gts.,  xxxiv.  54.] 

ORDNANCE,  Master  of  King  Charles  II.  granted  a  Warrant,  December  1683,  to 
George,  Lord  Dartmouth,  to  enable  him  as  Master  of  the  Ordnance  to  bear  on 
each  side  of  his  arms  a  field-piece  mounted,  to  show  the  honour  of  his  office, 
which  said  warrant  was  made  to  extend  to  his  successors  in  that  department. 

ORE  (Sussex).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

ORFORD  (Suffolk).     Argent,  in  an  ancient  ship  sable,  a  tower  triple-towered  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 


578 


ORANGE  FREE  STATE 


ORANGE  RIVER  COLONY 


ORFORD 


ORDNANCE  OFFICE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ORIEL  COLLEGE  (Oxford).  (Founded  1323,  by  Adam  le  Brome,  Confessor  to 
Edward  II.)  Gules  three  lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  or,  a  bordure  engrailed 
argent. 

[Recorded    in    the  College  of  Arms  at  the   Visitation  of  the  County  of 
Oxford,  1574.] 

ORKNEY.  Has  not  matriculated  armorial  bearings  in  Lyon  Register,  but  for  some 
reason  an  unauthoritative  record  exists  in  the  College  of  Arms.  Those  in  use, 
which  appear  to  be  generally  accepted,  are  those  of  the  old  Earldom  of  Orkney, 
which  as  such  appear  upon  the  escutcheon  of  the  Earl  of  Caithness.  They  are, 
azure,  a  ship  at  anchor,  oars  in  saltire,  and  sail  furled,  within  a  double  tressure 
flory  and  counterflory  or. 

ORKNEY,  See  of.  Argent,  St  Magnus  vested  in  royal  robes,  on  his  head  an  antique 
crown,  in  his  dexter  hand  a  sceptre  all  proper. 

[These  arms,  which  are  given  in  Burke's  "  Armory,"  were  never  matriculated 
in  Lyon  Register.] 

ORKNEY.     Refer  to  Aberdeen  and  Orkney,  Bishop  of. 

ORLEANS  (France).     Gules,  three  .  .  .  ,  on  a  chief  azure,  three  fleurs  delis  or. 


580 


ORIEL  COLLEGE  (OXFORD) 


ORKNEY 


ORLEANS 


ORKNEY,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

OSAKA,  See  of.     Argent,  a  cross  gules,  on  a  chief  azure,  the  sun  in  splendour  rising 
from  behind  mountains. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

OSNABRUCK,  Bishopric  of.     Argent,  a  wheel  of  six  spokes  gules. 

OSSETT  (Yorkshire).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

OSSORY,  See  of.  Ancient — Azure,  a  bishop  in  his  pontificals  standing  between  two 
pillars  argent,  a  mitre  on  his  head,  in  his  dexter  hand  a  crosier,  and  in  his  sinister 
a  Bible  closed,  all  or.  Modern — Gules  a  covered  cup,  on  the  top  thereof  a  cross 
pattee  between  five  crosses  pattee  fitchee  or.  Woodward  terms  this  coat  that 
of  the  see  of  Ferns. 

[These  last-mentioned  arms  are  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office  as  those  of 
Ossory,  and  remain  in  use,  but  through  the  disestablishment  of  the  Irish 
Church  they  are  really  extinct  and  their  present  use  is  illegal.] 

OSSORY,  FERNS,  AND  LEIGHLIN,  Bishop  of.  According  to  Crockford  only 
the  modern  arms  of  Ossory  are  made  use  of 

OSWESTRY  (Shropshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  in  use  are  "  Gules, 
a  cross  couped  argent,  between  four  lions  rampant  or."  Motto — "  Floreat 
Oswestria." 

Morris,  in  his  "  Armorial  Bearings  of  Shropshire  Families,"  quotes  these 
arms  "gu.  a  cross  between  four  lions  rampant  or,"  but  neither  form  has  any 
authority. 

The  seal  represents  a  figure  of  King  Oswald  crowned  and  seated  on  a  throne, 
holding  in  his  dexter  hand  a  sword,  the  sinister  grasping  a  tree. 


582 


OSAKA,  SEE  OF 


OSNABRUCK,  BISHOP  OF 


OSWESTRY 


OSSORY,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

OTLEY  ASSOCIATION  Azure,  three  towers  two  and  one  argent,  in  chief  two 
keys  in  saltire  or,  their  wards  upwards. 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms.     Gts.,  xx.  231.] 

OTTAWA,  See  of.     Argent,  a  cross  gules,  in  the  first  quarter  a  crosier  and  key  in 
saltire  or,  on  a  chief  azure,  the  crest  of  Hamilton,  viz.,  out  of  a  ducal  coronet  an 
oak-tree  penetrated  transversely  in  the  main-stem  by  a  frame  saw  all  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

OUNDLE  SCHOOL  This  school,  which  was  founded  and  is  maintained  by  and  is 
the  property  of  the  Grocers'  Company,  quite  properly  uses  the  arms  of  that 
company.     Motto — "  God  grant  Grace." 

OUR  LADY  INN.     Refer  to  New  Inn. 

OUR  LADY'S  COLLEGE  (Manchester).  Per  chevron  azure,  and  gules,  the  base 
semee  of  cross  crosslets  fitchee  or,  in  chief  two  leopards'  faces  jessant  de  lis  of 
the  last,  in  base  a  lion  rampant  argent.  Crest — Out  of  a  ducal  coronet  or,  a 
griffin's  head  azure. 

[Recorded,  College  of  Arms.] 

OVER-DARWEN.     See  Darwen. 

OWENS  COLLEGE  (Manchester).  Now  extended  into  the  Victoria  University 
of  Manchester.  Argent,  a  serpent  nowed  vert,  on  a  chief  nebulee  azure,  a  sun 
issuant  or.  Crest — Between  two  branches  of  laurel  a  palm  tree  proper,  suspended 
in  front  thereof  by  a  riband  azure,  a  shield  argent,  thereon  a  lion  rampant  gules 
and  a  chief  of  the  last  charged  with  three  bendlets  or.  Motto — "Arduus  ad 
solem." 

[Granted  14th  October  1871.] 


584 


OTLEY  ASSOCIATION 


OTTAWA,  SEE  OF 


OUR  LADY'S  COLLEGE 


OWENS  COLLEGE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

OXFORDSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  arms  of  the  City  of  Oxford 
are  frequently  used  and  quoted  more  or  less  correctly ;  but  the  seal  of  the 
County  Council  simply  exhibits  the  inscription,  "  Oxfordshire,  the  common  .seal 
of  the  County  Council,  1889." 

OXFORD,  City  of  (Oxfordshire).  Argent,  an  ox  gules,  passing  over  a  ford  of ' 
water  in  base  barry  wavy  azure  and  argent.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours 
a  demi-lion  rampant  guardant  azure,  crowned  with  an  imperial  crown,  holding 
between  the  paws  a  rose  gules,  charged  with  another  argent.  Supporters — On 
the  dexter  side  an  elephant  ermines,  eared,  collared,  and  lined  argent,  and  on 
the  sinister  side  a  beaver  vert,  its  tail  azure  and  argent,  ducally  gorged  and  lined 
or.     Motto — "  Fortis  est  Veritas." 

Berry  gives  a  note — "  In  the  City  Seal  the  sinister  supporter  is  engraved 
like  a  fox.  In  the  Visitation  of  Oxford,  taken  the  12th  of  August  1634,  the 
arms,  crest,  and  supporters  are  drawn  with  this  difference,  viz.,  the  base  of  the 
escocheon  barry-wavy  of  six  az.  and  ar.,  the  escocheon  encircled  with  a  ribbon 
az.,  charged  with  four  roses  and  four  fleurs-de-lis  or,  placed  alternately  ;  the 
ribbon  edged  of  the  last.  The  crest  is  strewed  with  fleurs-de-lis,  az.,  and  the 
sinister  supporter  drawn  like  a  beaver." 

Burke  adds  a  note  that  some  authorities  give,  "  Bendy  wavy  argent  and 
azure,  an  ox  gu.  passing  over  a  ford  ppr." 

OXFORD,  See  of.     Sable,  a  fesse  argent,  in  chief  three  ladies  from  the  waist  couped 
proper,  heads  afifrontee,  arrayed  and  veiled  of  the  second  crowned  or,  in  base  an 
ox  also  of  the  second,  armed,  passing  over  a  ford  barry  wavy  of  six  of  the  second''^ 
and  azure. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

The  Bishop  of  Oxford,  as  Chancellor  of  the  Order  of  the  Garter,  places  a 
Garter  round  his  arms. 

OXFORD,   Cathedral   Church    of.     Quarterly    azure   and    gules,    a   cross   argent, 
thereon  a  book  as  in  the  arms  of  the  University  of  O.xford,  surmounted  by  a 
■Royal  crown  proper,  between  in  the  first  and  fourth  quarters  three  fleurs-de-lis, 
and  in  the  second  and  third  as  many  lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  all  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms,  Visitation  of  Oxford,  1574.] 

OXFORD,  University  of.     See  University  of  Oxford. 

OXFORD  UNIVERSITY.  Refer  to  University  of  Oxford  and  to  the  several 
Colleges,  viz.:— All  Souls',  Baliol,  Brazenose,  Christ  Church,  Corpus  Christi, 
Exeter,  Hereford,  Jesus,  Keble,  Lincoln,  Magdalen,  Merton,  New,  Oriel, 
Pembroke,  Queen's,  St  Edmund's  Hall,  St  John  the  Baptist,  Trinity,  University, 
Wadham,  Worcester. 


586 


OXFORD,  CITY  OF 


OXFORD,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PADDINGTON,  Borough  of  (London).  Azure,  two  swords  in  saltire  proper, 
pommels  and  hilts  or,  enfiled  by  a  mural  crown  of  the  last,  two  wolves'  heads 
erased  in  chief  argent. 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  April  5,  1902.] 

PADUA  (Italy).     Argent,  a  cross  gules. 

PAINTERS,  or  PAINTER-STAINERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of, 
London.  (Incorporated  1467.)  Quarterly  i  and  4  azure,  three  escutcheons, 
two  and  one  argent,  2  and  3  azure,  a  chevron  between  three  phoenix  heads 
erased  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  phoenix  or,  in  flames  proper. 
Supporters — Two  leopards  argent,  spotted  with  various  colours,  ducally  crowned, 
collared  and  chained  or.     Motto—''  Amor  et  obedientia." 

[Granted  by  Thomas  Holme,  Clarenceux,  i486.  Confirmed  by  Benolt, 
Clarenceux,  nth  October  1531.] 

PAINTERS'  COMPANY  (Exeter).  Used  the  same  arms  as  the  Painters'  Company 
of  London  with  the  Motto — "  Amor  queat  obedientia." 

PAINTERS'  GUILD.  Gules,  three  inescutcheons  argent.  Mantling— Gn\es  and 
argent.  Crest — Out  of  a  coronet,  a  demi-maiden  proper  richly  habited  per  pale 
gules  and  argent  between  two  fallow-deer's  palmated  attires  proper. 

[The  three  shields  were  the  trading  sign  of  the  "  shield  workers  "  throughout 
Europe— in  Germany  the  field  being  gules,  and  in  France  and  the  Netherlands 
azure,  the  escutcheons  being  usually  argent,  but  sometimes  or.  From  the 
decoration  and  painting  of  shields,  to  the  shield  workers  came  the  general  craft 
of  painting.  These  shields  appear  in  the  arms  of  the  Painters'  Company  of 
London.  The  crest  consisted  of  dragons'  wings,  stags'  antlers,  fallow-deer's 
horns,  and  the  figure  was  always  a  feminine  one,  though  very  often  it  is  a 
negress  who  is  placed  between  the  horns.  The  crest  was  supposed  to  be  an 
imitation  of  the  so-called  "  lusterweibchen  "  (figures  of  women  to  hold  lamps  or 
lustres — compare  the  crest  of  the  Wax-chandlers'  Company),  which  were  also 
made  by  the  shield  workers.] 


588 


PADUA 


PADDINGTON 


PAINTERS'  COMPANY 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PAISLEY,  Burgh  of  (Renfrewshire).  Or,  a  fesse  chequy  azure  and  argent, 
between  two  cinquefoils  gules  in  chief,  and  in  base  two  covered  cups  of  the 
second,  over  all  the  figure  of  a  mitred  Abbot  vested  proper,  his  dexter  hand  in 
the  act  of  benediction,  and  his  sinister  holding  a  crozier  also  proper.  Over  the 
shield  a  mural  crown.  Motto  (below  shield) — "  Lord,  let  Paisley  flourish  by  the 
preaching  of  Thy  Word." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  4th  April  191 2.] 

PALERMO  (Italy).  Gules,  an  eagle  displayed  and  crowned  or,  holding  in  its 
claws  a  scroll  argent,  charged  with  the  letters  S.P.O.R. 

PAPER-STAINERS  (Gateshead).  (Query  Paynter-Stainers.)  Azure,  a  chevron 
between  three  phoenix  heads  erased  or.  Ci-esl — A  phoenix  close  or,  in  flames 
proper.  Supporters — Two  leopards  argent,  spotted  sable,  ducally  crowned, 
collared  and  chained  or. 

[Of  no  authority,  taken  from  the  Gateshead  Charter,  1671.] 

PARAGUAY.  Azure,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert  a  lion  sejant  to  the  sinister  and 
guardant  or,  in  front  of  a  pole,  thereon  a  cap  of  liberty  gules,  irradiated  or,  the 
pole  between  the  words  "Paz  y"  on  the  de.xter  side,  and  "Justicia"  on  the 
sinister  side. 

PARIS  (France).  Gules,  on  waves  of  the  sea  in  base  a  three-masted  ship  in  full 
sail  proper,  a  chief  azure,  seme-de-lis  or. 


59° 


PALERMO 


PAISLEY 


PARAGUAY 


PARIS 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PARISH  CLERKS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  1232.) 
Azure,  a  fleur-de-lis  or,  on  a  chief  gules,  a  leopard's  face  between  two  song 
books  (closed)  of  the  second,  stringed  vert.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours, 
a  cubit  arm  erect  vested  azure,  cuffed  ermine,  holding  in  the  hand  proper  a 
music  book  (open)  of  the  last,  garnished  or,  stringed  vert.  Motto — "  Unitas 
Societatis  Stabilitas." 

[Granted  30th  March  15S2.  Confirmed,  approved,  and  entered  by  Henry 
St  George,  at  the  Visitation  of  London,  1634].  Supporters  are  used,  viz.  on 
either  side  an  angel  holding  by  the  interior  hand  and  blowing  a  trumpet,  but 
these  are  of  no  authority.] 

PARMA,  Duchy  of     Or,  six  fleurs-de-lis  azure. 

PARTICK  (Lanarkshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  Those 
upon  the  seal,  which  appear  to  be  in  general  use,  are  of  quite  recent  invention, 
and  are  as  follows  : — Quarterly  or  and  gules,  in  the  first  and  fourth  quarters  a 
lymphad  with  sails  furled  and  oars  in  action  sable,  in  the  second  a  castle  triple- 
towered,  and  in  the  third  a  bishop's  mitre  labelled,  both  proper  ;  over  all  on  a 
chief  sable  a  garb,  also  proper,  between  two  bezants  (they  are  so  blazoned  in  the 
Catalogue  of  the  Heraldic  Exhibition,  but  query  if  they  really  are  ;  the  seal  and 
notepaper  before  me  are  very  indistinct,  they  may  be  intended  for  mill-stones. 
— Ed.).     Crest^A  steamboat.     Motto — "  Industria  ditat." 

PATENTEES  FOR  THE  MAKING  AND  DRESSING  OF  ALAMODES, 
RENFORCE,  AND  LUTE  STRINGS  Argent,  on  a  chevron  azure,  between 
two  butterflies  countervolant  in  chief  sable,  and  a  mulberry  tree  proper  on  a 
mount  in  base  vert,  both  charged  with  several  silkworms  or,  three  cocoons  or 
silkworm's  eggs  of  the  last.  Ciest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  Justice  proper, 
crined  or,  about  the  head  a  glory,  in  the  right  hand  a  sword,  hilt  and  pommel  gold, 
blade  proper,  in  the  left  a  pair  of  scales  or.     Motto — "  Deus  illustrat  humiies." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  "  to  Peter  de  Clux,  Wm.  Sherard,  and  Paul 
Clowdesley  of  London,  empowered  by  patent  under  the  Great  Seal  to  make 
Alamodes,  Renforce  and  Lutestrings  to  be  used  for  sealing  the  above 
commodities."] 

PATTEN  MAKERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated 
2nd  August  1670.)  Gules,  on  a  chevron  argent,  between  three  pattens  or,  tied 
of  the  second,  the  ties  lined  azure,  two  cutting  knives  conjoined  sable.  Crest- 
On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  patten  as  in  the  arms.  Motto — "  Recipient 
Foeminse  Sustentacula  nobis." 
[Of  no  authority.] 


592 


PARMA 


PARISH  CLERKS,  COMPANY  OF 


PATTEN  MAKERS,  COMPANY  OF 


I  Jii/QPuscRifl-DicaciQl  f 


PARTICK 


2P 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PAVIORS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.     Argent,  a  chevron  between 
three  flagstones  sable.     Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  an  arm  embowed 
vested  azure,  cuffed  argent,  holding  in  the  hand  proper  a  pickaxe  of  the  last. 
Motto — "  God  can  raise  to  Abraham  children  of  stones." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

PAYNTER-STAYNERS.     Refer  to  Painters,  and  refer  to  Cutlers. 

PEARL  LIFE  ASSURANCE  COMPANY,  LIMITED  (London).  Argent,  a 
saltire  gules,  surmounted  by  a  sword  erect  counterchanged  between  a  covered 
cup  and  a  hind  lodged,  pierced  with  an  arrow,  in  fesse  of  the  second.  Crest — On 
a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  figure  representing  St  Margaret  vested  gules,  in  the 
dexter  hand  a  pearl,  in  the  sinister  a  palm  branch  both  proper,  at  the  feet  a 
dragon  couchant  reguardant  argent.  Motto — "  Damus  plus  quam  pollicimur." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  191 1.] 

PEEBLESSHIRE.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  County  Council 
simply  exhibits  the  legend,  "  Peeblesshire  County  Council." 

PEEBLES,  Royal  Burgh  of  (Peeblesshire).  Gules,  three  salmon  counter-naiant 
in  pale  proper.     Motto — "  Contra  nando  incrementum." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  1894.  The  device,  in  allusion  to  the 
spawning  of  salmon  in  the  river,  indicates  that  for  every  salmon  which  goes  up 
the  river,  two  go  back  to  the  sea.] 

PEEL  (Isle  of  Man).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

PEMBROKESHIRE.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

PEMBROKE  (Pembrokeshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  a 
castle  triple-towered,  the  two  exterior  towers  domed  and  on  each  a  flag.  The 
legend  is  "  Sigilhim  commune  Penbrochie." 

PEMBROKE  COLLEGE  (Oxford).  (Founded  in  1620  by  the  joint  benefactions 
of  Thomas  Tesdale,  of  Glympton,  Co.  O.xford,  and  Richard  W'hitwick,  B.A., 
Rector  of  Ilsley,  Co.  Berks;  originally  it  was  called  Broadgate  Hall,  famous  for 
the  study  of  the  civil  law  and  obtained  the  name  of  Pembroke  College  from  the 
Earl  of  Pembroke,  who  was  Chancellor  of  the  Universitj'  when  the  college  was 
founded.)  Per  pale  azure  and  gules  three  lions  rampant  two  and  one  argent,  a 
chief  per  pale  or  and  of  the  third  charged  on  the  dexter  side  with  a  rose  of  the 
second,  and  on  the  sinister  with  a  thistle  vert. 
[Of  no  authority.] 


594 


PAVIORS,  COMPANY  OF 


PEARL  LIFE  ASSURANCE  COMPANY 


PEMBROKE  COLLEGE  (OXFORD) 


PEEBLES 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PEMBROKE  HALL  (Cambridge).  (Founded  in  1343  by  Mary,  daughter  of 
Guy  de  Chastillion,  Compte  de  St  Paul,  in  France,  and  wife  of  Aymer  de 
Valence,  Earl  of  Pembroke.)  The  dexter  half  of  the  coat  of  Valence,  dimidiated 
with  the  sinister  half  of  the  coat  of  Chastillion.  The  arms  of  Valance  are — 
Barry  of  sixteen  argent  and  azure,  over  all  ten  martlets  in  orle  gules.  Those  of 
de  Chastillion — Gules,  three  pallets  vair  on  a  chief  or,  a  label  of  three  points 
throughout  azure. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

PENANG  (otherwise  Prince  of  Wales's  Island).     Refer  to  Straits  Settlements. 

PENNSYLVANIA,  U.S.A.  (State  device.)  Arms,  on  a  fesse  between  a  ship  in  full 
sail  in  chief,  and  three  garbs,  or  wheat  sheaves  in  base,  an  eagle,  wings  expanded 
Supporters — Two  horses.    Motto — "  Liberty  and  Independence." 

PENRHYN  (Cornwall).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  upon  an 
escutcheon  a  man's  bust  in  profile,  vested  about  and  couped  below  the  shoulders, 
wreathed  about  the  temples  with  leaves  tied  at  the  back  with  two  ribbons,  and 
with  the  legend  "  Burgus  Penryn."  Berry,  who  treats  this  as  a  coat-of-arms, 
adds  a  note  ;  "  There  is  not  any  painting  of  the  arms  in  the  Borough,  but  it  is 
there  supposed  that  the  field  should  be  white  and  the  head  ppr." 

PENZANCE  (Cornwall).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  the  head 
of  St  John  the  Baptist  in  a  charger,  with  the  legend,  "  Pensans  anno  Domini 
1614." 

PEPPERERS'  COMPANY.     Refer  to  Grocers. 

PERSIA.  Azure,  on  a  mount  in  front  of  the  sun  in  splendour,  a  lion  statant 
guardant  or,  holding  in  his  dexter  paw  a  scymitar,  all  proper. 


596 


X~LS 


PEMBROKE  HALL  (CAMBRIDGE) 


PENRHYN 


PERSIA 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PERTH,  County  of.  The  County  of  Perth  bears  Or,  a  lyon  rampant  gules,  armed 
and  langued  azure,  standing  on  a  compartment  or  mount  proper,  and  brandish- 
ing in  his  dexter  fore-paw  a  scymitar  of  the  last,  all  within  a  double  tressure 
flowered  and  counter-flowered  of  the  second  ;  on  a  dexter  chief  canton  of  the 
third  a  front  view  of  the  Palace  of  Scone  argent,  ensigned  on  the  top  with  an 
imperial  crown  proper.  Above  the  shield  on  a  wreath  of  the  liveries  is  set  for 
Crest — A  demy  Highlander  affrontee,  bonnet,  belted,  plaid,  dirk  and  pistols, 
brandishing  in  his  right  hand  a  broadsword  aloft  in  a  threatening  posture,  a 
target  on  his  left  arm,  all  proper,  and  on  a  compartment  below  the  shield,  on 
which  are  these  words,  "  Pro  lege  et  libertate,"  are  placed  for  Supporters — On 
the  dexter  an  eagle  regardant  with  wings  adossee  proper,  and  on  the  sinister  a 
war-horse,  argent  furnished  gules. 

Matriculated,  Lyon  Office,  23rd  January  1800. 

(The  original  patent  was  found  with  some  other  old  papers  in  this  Office  on 
1 2th  April  1890,  and  compared  with  the  entry  and  found  correct,  and  it  was  sent 
to  the  Clerk  of  the  County  Council  of  Perth  on  the  14th  April  1890.) 

The  following  is  a  copy  of  the  patent,  which  is  given  as  being  remarkable  in 
several  ways  : — 

"  To  all  and  sundry  whom  these  Presents  Do  or  May  Concern,  we  Robert 
Auriol  Drummond  Hay,  Earl  of  Kinnoul,  Lord  Lyon  King  at  Arms  for  Scotland, 
Do  hereby  certify  and  declare  that  ensigns  armorial  pertaining  or  belonging  to 
the  County  of  Perth  Are  matriculated  in  the  Publick  Registers  of  the  Lyon 
Office  and  are  blazoned  as  on  the  margin  thus  viz.  or,  a  lion  rampant  Gules 
Armed  and  Langued  Azure,  standing  on  a  Compartment  or  Mount  Proper  and 
brandishing  in  his  dexter  fore  paw,  a  Scymitar  of  the  last  all  within  a  double 
tressure  flowered  and  counterflowered  of  the  second  on  a  Dexter  chief 
Canton  of  the  third  a  front  view  of  the  Palace  of  Scone  Argent  ensigned  on  the 
top  with  an  Imperial  crown  proper.  Above  the  Shield  on  a  wreath  of  the 
Liveries  is  set  for  Crest,  a  Demy  Highlander  affrontee,  Bonnet,  Belted,  Plaid, 
Dirk  and  Pistols,  Brandishing  in  his  Right  hand  a  broad  sword  aloft  in  a 
threatening  posture  a  Target  on  his  left  arm  all  proper.  And  on  a  Compartment 
below  the  shield  on  which  are  these  words  Pro  lege  et  libertate,  are  placed  for 
Supporters  on  the  dexter  an  Eagle  reguardant  with  wings  addossee  proper.  And 
on  the  Sinister  a  War  Horse  Argent,  furnished  Gules  which  Armorial  Ensigns 
above  blazoned  We  Do  hereby  Ratify  Confirm,  and  Assign  to  the  County  of 
Perth  as  Its  Proper  Arms  and  Bearing  In  All  Time  Coming,  In  Testimony 
whereof  These  presents  are  subscribed  by  James  Home,  Esquire,  Our  Deputy 
and  the  Great  Seal  of  Our  Office  is  appended  Hereunto  At  Edinburgh  the 
Twenty  third  day  of  January,  In  the  Year  One  Thousand  Eight  Hundred. — 

(Signed)  James  Home. 

"  Lyon  Office,  23  January  i8cx3. 

"This  Patent  duly  recorded.— RoB.  RANKEN,  E.A.C." 


598 


PERTH,  COUNTY  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PERTH  (Perthshire).  The  entry  in  Lyon  Register  is  as  follows  :— "  The  Royall 
Burgh  of  Peaith  gives  for  Ensigncs  Arvioriall,  Gules,  ane  holy  lambe  passant 
regardant  staff  and  cross  argent,  with  the  Banner  of  St  Andrew  proper,  all 
within  a  double  tressure  colour-flowered  of  the  second,  the  escutcheon  being 
surmounted  on  the  breast  of  ane  eagle  with  two  neckes  displayed  or.  The 
Motto  in  ane  EscroU,  Pro  Rege  Lege  et  Grege." 

PERTH,   See  of  (Western  Australia).      Azure,  two  crosiers  in    saltire    argent, 
headed  or  between  four  mullets  pierced  and  radiated  gold. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

PERU.  Per  fesse  and  the  chief  per  pale,  dexter  azure,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert,  a 
Llama  or  Peruvian  sheep  to  the  sinister  proper  :  the  sinister  argent,  on  a  mount 
in  base  vert,  a  tree  proper,  the  base  gules,  a  cornucopia  fesseways  or. 

Berry,  in  his  "Encyclopaedia  Heraldica,"  quotes  the  following  coat  : — 
Arms — The  Sierra,  with  the  sea  in  base,  from  behind  the  mountains, 
the  sun  rising  in  splendour,  all  proper.  Crest — A  plantain,  fructed  proper. 
Supporters — On  the  dexter  side  a  condor  eagle,  and  on  the  sinister  a  Llama, 
or  Peruvian  sheep,  both  proper.  Motto — "  Renacio  el  Sol  de  Peru."  (The 
Sun  of  Peru  is  risen  again.)  Colours — Fesseways  of  three  gules  argent  and 
gules,  the  sun  in  splendour  or. 


600 


PERTH 


PERU 


PERTH,  SEE  OF  (WESTERN  AUSTRALIA) 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PETERBOROUGH  (Northamptonshire).     Azure,  two  keys  endorsed  in  saltire  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

Burke  in  his  "  General  Armory  "  gives,  Gules,  two  keys  endorsed  in  saltire 
between  four  cross  crosslets  fitchee.  Berry  also  gives  this  coat,  and  adds  a 
note :  "  Peterborough  uses  for  its  Arms  those  of  the  Deanery,  the  Dean  and 
Chapter  being  Lords  of  the  Manor." 

PETERBOROUGH,  See  of.  Gules,  two  keys  in  saltire,  the  wards  upwards  between 
four  cross  crosslets  fitchee  or. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

PETERBOROUGH,  Dean  of.  Gules,  two  swords  in  saltire  between  four  crosses 
pattee  argent. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

PETERHEAD  (Aberdeenshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings. 
The  seal,  however,  which  bears  the  legend  "  Town  of  Peterhead,"  e.xhibits  what 
is  probably  intended  for  the  achievement  of  Keith,  Earl  Marischal  of  Scotland, 
namely,  Argent,  on  a  chief  or,  three  pallets  gules.  This  should  of  course  be. 
Argent,  on  a  chief  gules,  three  pallets  or.  Crest — A  hart's  head  proper.  Motto — 
"  Veritas  vincit."  Behind  the  escutcheon  are  placed  the  two  batons  appertaining 
to  the  office  of  Earl  Marischal.  Upon  the  Town-Clerk's  notepaper,  and  within 
the  legend,  "  Police  Commissioners  and  Town  Council  of  Peterhead,"  appears  the 
same  achievement  though  here  the  batons  are  omitted,  the  error  in  the  chief  is 
corrected,  but  a  coronet,  a  peer's  helmet,  a  lambrequin  and  two  harts  as 
supporters  are  introduced.  The  coronet  is  one  unknown  to  the  editor  as  a 
coronet  of  rank,  in  which  guise  it  appears,  being  placed  below  the  helmet. 


602 


PETERBOROUGH 


PETERBOROUGH,  DEAN  OF 


PETERBOROUGH,  SEE  OF 


PETERHEAD 


THE   BOOK   OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

PETER   HOUSE,  or  ST    PETER'S  COLLEGE  (Cambridge).     (Founded   in 
1256  by  Hugh  de  Balesham,  or  Balsham,  Bishop  of  Ely.)    Or,  three  palets  gules, 
a  bordure  of  the  last  charged  with  eight  ducal  coronets  of  the  first. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

PETERSBURG.     See  St  Petersburg. 

PETERSFIELD  (Hampshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  but  the  following  are 
quoted  by  Burke's  "  General  Armory  " :  "  Ar.  on  a  rose  gu.  barbed  vert,  an 
escutcheon  of  the  first,  charged  with  an  annulet  sa.  betw.  four  pellets." 

PETROGRAD.     See  St  Petersburg. 

PEWTERERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  20th 
January  1473.)  Azure,  on  a  chevron  or,  between  three  cross-bars  of  pewter 
(antique  limbecks)  argent,  as  many  roses  gules  seeded  of  the  second  and  barbed 
vert.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  mount  vert,  thereon  two  arms 
embowed  vested  argent,  cuffed  gules,  holding  in  both  hands  a  pewter  dish  of  the 
third.  Supporters — Two  sea-horses  or,  their  tails  proper.  Motto — "  In  God  is 
all  my  Trust." 

[Granted  20th  May  1479.] 

PEWTERERS  (Gateshead).  Azure,  on  a  chevron  or,  between  three  antique 
limbecks  argent,  as  many  roses  gules.  Crest — Two  arms  embowed  proper, 
holding  in  both  arms  erect  a  dish  argent.  Supporters — Two  sea-horses  or,  tails 
proper.     Motto — "  In  God  is  all  my  trust." 

[Of  no  authority.     Taken  from  the  Gateshead  Charter,  1671.] 


604 


PETER  HOUSE,  OR  ST  PETER'S  COLL.  (CAMB.) 


PETERSFIELD 


PEWTERERS,  COMPANY  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PHARMACEUTICAL  SOCIETY  OF  GREAT  BRITAIN.  Or,  on  a  cross 
gules  between  a  dove  holding  in  the  mouth  an  olive  branch  in  the  first  quarter, 
an  aloe  in  the  second,  a  staff  erect  entwined  by  a  serpent  in  the  third,  and  an 
alembic  and  receiver  in  the  fourth,  all  proper,  a  pair  of  scales  of  the  first,  on  a 
chief  azure,  a  stag  lodged  also  of  the  first.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a 
mortar,  therein  a  pestle  or. —  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  figure  intended  to  represent 
Avicenna  habited  in  a  dark  red  robe,  with  a  white  undervest,  his  shoes  red, 
around  his  waist  a  shawl  also  red,  fringed  gold,  and  upon  his  head  a  white 
turban,  in  his  right  hand  a  staff  gold  entwined  with  a  serpent  proper  ;  (sinister) 
a  figure  intended  to  represent  Galen  habited  in  a  long  white  vest  and  loose 
robe,  his  sandals  red,  and  holding  in  his  right  hand  a  steelyard  or.  Motto — 
"  Habenda  ratio  valetudinis." 

[College  of  Arms.     Gts.,  xlvii.  74,  79.] 

PHILOSOPHY    SCHOOL    (Cambridge).      The   arms   of  the    See   of  Lincoln, 
impaling,  Argent  a  cross  moline  sable,  being  the   arms  of  William  Alnwick, 
Bishop  of  Lincoln. 
[Not  authorised.] 

PHOTOCHEMIGRAPHISTS,  Guild  of  (Germany).  Per  fesse,  in  chief  sable  a 
demi-sun  in  splendour  issuant  or,  the  base  per  pale  on  the  dexter  side  gules,  an 
acid  flask  proper,  on  the  sinister  argent,  a  printing-roller  sable.  Mantlmg — Or 
and  sable.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  same,  three  sunflowers  proper.  Motto — 
"  In  luce  mundus." 

PHYSIC  SCHOOL  (Cambridge).  Refer  to  Cambridge  University,  Regius 
Professors. 

PHYSICIANS,  Royal  College  of  (London).  (Incorporated  by  Henry  VIII.,  a.d. 
1523.)  Sable,  a  hand  proper  vested  argent,  issuing  out  of  clouds  in  chief  of  the 
second  rayonnee  or,  feeling  the  pulse  of  an  arm  proper  issuing  from  the  sinister 
side  of  the  shield  vested  argent,  in  base  a  pomegranate  or,  between  five  demi 
fleurs-de-lis  bordering  the  edge  of  the  escutcheon  of  the  last. 
[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.] 

PHYSICIANS,  College  of  (Dublin).  (College  constituted  by  Charles  II.,  and  arms 
granted  by  St  George,  Ulster,  25th  August  1667.)  Per  fesse  argent  and  azure  in 
the  middle  of  the  chief  a  celestial  hand  issuing  out  of  a  cloud  feeling  the  pulse 
of  a  terrestrial  hand  all  proper,  and  in  base  the  royal  harp  of  Ireland,  as  a  dis- 
tinction from  the  arms  of  the  like  College  in  England.  Motto — "  Ratione  et 
experientia." 


606 


PHARMACEUTICAL  SOCIETY  OF  GREAT  BRITAIN 


PHYSICIANS,  COLLEGE  OF  (LONDON) 


PHOTOCHEMIGRAPHISTS,  GUILD  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PHYSICIANS,  King  and  Queen's  College  of  (Ireland).  (College  reconstituted 
29th  September  1692,  and  arms  regranted  by  Burke,  Ulster,  1S63.  By  a  new 
Charter  this  is  now  The  Royal  College  of  Physicians  in  Ireland.)  Per  fesse 
ermine  and  azure,  a  dexter  celestial  hand  issuing  out  of  clouds  in  chief  proper, 
and  in  base  the  harp  of  Ireland  ensigned  with  the  royal  crown,  all  also  proper. 
Motto — "  Ratione  et  experientia." 

PHYSICIANS,  Royal  College  of  (Edinburgh).  Argent,  issuing  from  a  mount  in 
base  an  oak  tree  proper,  fructed  or,  on  a  canton  of  the  last  a  lion  rampant  within 
a  double  tressure  flory  counterflory  gules.  Mantling — Vert,  doubled  argent. 
Crest — Issuing  out  of  a  ducal  coronet,  the  figure  of  Apollo,  couped  at  the  waist, 
with  bow  and  quiver  on  his  back,  and  holding  a  lyre  in  his  hands,  wreathed 
about  the  temples  with  a  garland  of  bay  all  proper,  and  in  an  escroll  over  the 
same  this  Motto — "  Non  sinit  esse  feros."  Supporters — Two  savages  wreathed 
about  the  middle  with  oak  proper,  the  one  on  the  dexter  holding  in  his  exterior 
hand  a  covered  cup  or,  and  that  on  the  sinister  a  sprig  of  rue  vert. 
[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  1900.] 


608 


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^'') 


PHYSICIANS,  ROYAL  COLLEGE  OF  (EDINBURGH) 


2Q 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PHYSICIANS  AND  SURGEONS  OF  GLASGOW,  Royal  Faculty  of. 
Quarterly :  i  and  4  azure,  an  ^Esculapian  rod  in  pale  between  a  lancet  on 
the  dexter,  and  a  poppy  slipped  and  seeded  on  the  sinister,  all  proper  ;  2  or,  a 
lion  rampant  gules,  armed  and  langued  azure,  within  a  double  tressure  flory 
counterflory  of  the  second ;  3  argent,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert,  an  oak-tree 
proper,  the  stem  at  the  base  thereof  surmounted  by  a  salmon  on  its  back  also 
proper,  with  a  signet  ring  in  its  mouth  or,  on  the  top  of  the  tree  a  redbreast,  and 
in  the  sinister  fess  point  an  ancient  handbell,  both  proper  [Helmet  of  a 
Knight].  Mantling — Azure  doubled  argent.  Crest— An  open  book  proper, 
leaved  gules,  surmounted  of  an  antique  burning  lamp  or,  and  in  an  escrol  over 
the  same  this  Motto — "Conjurat  amice."  Supporters — (Dexter)  the  figure  ol 
Minerva  habited  azure  and  argent,  fimbriated  sable,  her  helmet  or,  holding  a 
spear  proper  in  her  dexter  hand  and  a  palm  branch  vert  downwards  in  her 
sinister ;  and  (sinister)  the  figure  of  Hygeia  habited  argent,  fimbriated  gules,  on 
her  head  a  tiara  or,  her  dexter  arm  entwined  with  a  serpent  proper  feeding  out 
of  a  cup  gold  in  her  sinister  hand:  on  a  compartment  below  the  shield  this 
Motto — "  Non  vivere  sed  valere  vita." 

[Matriculated,  Lyon  Office,  January  14,  1910.] 

PINNERS'  or  PINMAKERS'  COMPANY  (London).  (Incorporated  20th 
August  1636.)  Vert,  a  demi-virgin  couped  at  the  waist  proper,  vested  gules, 
turned  down  ermine,  crowned  and  crined  or.  Motto — "Virginitas  unitas 
nostra  fraternitas." 

Berry,  in  his  "Encyclopaedia  Heraldica,"  says  of  the  foregoing,  "This, 
however  is  to  be  esteemed  the  fancy  of  some  painter  and  not  regular  arms,  as  the 
Company  do  not  pretend  to  have  any  armorial  ensign."  The  above  device  is 
really  the  design  upon  the  seal. 

PIPEMAKERS'  COMPANY.     Refer  to  Tobacco  Pipemakers'  Company. 

PISA  (Italy).     Gules,  a  cross  urdee  argent. 

PITTENWEEM  (Fifeshire).  The  entry  in  the  Lyon  Register  is  as  follows: 
— "  The  Royall  Burgh  of  Pittenweeme  gives  for  Ensignes  Armoriall,  Azur  in  the 
sea  a  Gallie  with  her  oars  in  action  argent,  and  therein  standing  the  figure  of 
Saint  Adrian  with  long  garments  close  girt,  and  a  mytre  on  his  head  proper, 
holding  in  his  sinister  hand  a  crosier  or.  On  the  stern  a  flag  disveloped  argent, 
charged  with  the  Royall  Armes  of  Scotland,  with  this  word  '  Deo  Duce.'  2nd 
August  1673." 


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PITTENWEEM 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PLAISTERERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  loth 
March  1501.)  Azure,  on  a  chevron  engrailed  argent,  between  two  plaisterers' 
hammers  and  a  trowel  argent  in  chief,  handles  or,  and  a  brush  of  four  knots  in 
base  of  the  third,  handled  of  the  fourth,  a  rose  gules,  seeded  or,  stalked  and 
leaved  vert  between  two  fleurs-de-lis  of  the  first.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  a  de.xter  arm  embowed,  vested  bendy  of  four  gules  and  or,  holding  in 
the  hand  proper  a  plaisterer's  hammer  argent,  handled  or.  Supporters — Two 
opinici  vert,  purfled  or,  winged  and  membered  gules.  Motto—"  Let  brotherly 
love  continue."     (Another,  "  Factum  est.") 

[Granted  by  Hawley,  Clarenceux,  15th  January  1546.    Grant  printed  "  Misc. 
Gen.  et  Her,"  i.  139.] 

PLANTATIONS       Refer  to  Trade  and  Pantations,  Commissioners  of 

PLASTERERS'  COMPANY.  Refer  to  Plaisterers  and  to  Bricklayers  and 
Plasterers. 

PLAYING-CARD  MAKERS'  COMPANY.     Refer  to  Makers  of  Playing  Cards. 

PLUMBERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  12th 
April  161 1.)  Or,  on  a  chevron  sable,  between  a  cross-staff  fessewise  of  the  last 
enclosed  by  two  plummets  azure,  all  in  chief,  and  a  level  reversed  in  base  of 
the  second,  two  soldering  irons  in  saltire,  between  a  cutting-knife  on  the  dexter, 
and  a  shave-hook  on  the  sinister  argent.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours. 
a  triple  fountain  or,  issuing  water  proper,  on  the  top  an  angel  of  the  last, 
vested  argent,  ducally  crowned  and  winged  of  the  first,  holding  in  the  dexter 
hand  a  sword  and  in  the  sinister  a  pair  of  scales  both  or.  Mottoes — (over  crest) 
"Justicia  et  pax,"  (below  arms)  "  In  God  is  all  our  Hope." 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

PLUMBERS  (Gateshead).  Argent,  on  a  chevron  between  a  cross-staff  fesseways 
sable,  enclosed  by  two  plummets  azure  all  in  chief,  and  in  base  a  level  reversed 
of  the  second,  two  soldering  irons  in  saltire  or,  between  a  cutting-knife  on  the 
dexter  and  a  shavehook  on  the  sinister  side  of  the  first.  Crest — A  triple  fountain 
argent,  issuing  water  proper,  on  the  top  an  angel  holding  in  the  dexter  hand  a 
sword  and  in  the  sinister  a  pair  of  scales,  all  or. 

[Of  no  authority.     Taken  from  the  Gateshead  Charter,  1671.] 


6l2 


PLAISTERERS,  COMPANY  OF 


PLUMBERS,  COMPANY   OF  (LONDON) 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PLYMOUTH  (Devonshire).  Argent,  a  saltire  vert  between  four  towers  sable. 
Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms,  as  is  also  an  older  coat,  namely,  Gules,  on 
waves  of  the  sea  proper,  a  three-masted  ship  or,  on  each  mast  a  sail  furled 
argent  and  a  banner  of  St  George,  on  the  main-mast  a  round  top.  The  saltire 
is  supposed  to  be  in  allusion  to  St  Andrew,  the  patron  saint  of  the  principal 
church  of  Plymouth.  Upon  the  seal  recorded  in  the  visitation  containing  the 
first-mentioned  arms  the  escutcheon  is  surmounted  by  a  coronet  composed  of 
fleurs-de-lis  and  strawberry  leaves.  This  coronet  appears  always  to  be  made 
use  of,  though  usually  drawn  as  of  fleurs-de-lis  only  (perhaps  because  Burke  so 
quotes  it  as  of  eight).  Likewise  two  supporters  (two  lions  rampant  guardant  or) 
seem  to  have  been  appropriated  without  any  authority,  together  with  the  Motto, 
"Turris  fortissima  est  nomen  Jehova."  As  it  is  invariably  so  used,  an  illustra- 
tion is  given  of  the  whole,  but  it  should  be  clearly  understood  that  the  escutcheon 
only  is  of  any  authority. 

POLAND.  Refer  to  Russia.  The  former  Kings  of  Poland  bore  quarterly,  I 
and  4  gules,  an  eagle  displayed  argent,  beaked,  membered,  and  crowned 
or  (Poland),  2  and  3  gules,  a  cavalier  completely  accoutred  in  armour,  on 
a  horse  in  full  speed  argent,  in  his  dexter  hand  a  drawn  sword,  on  the 
sinister  arm  a  shield  azure,  thereon  a  patriarchal  cross  argent  (for  Lithuania), 
over  all,  an  escocheon  of  pretence  per  fesse  sable  and  argent,  two  swords  in 
saltire,  their  points  in  chief  gules,  hilts  and  pommels  or,  impaling  Saxony. 
Crest — On  an  imperial  crown,  an  eagle  displa)'ed  as  in  the  arms,  the  shield 
encompassed  with  the  ensigns  of  the  order  of  the  White  Eagle. 

POLLOKSHAWS  (Co.  Renfrew).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  upon  the 
seal  are  argent,  on  a  saltire  sable,  an  annulet  or  stoned  proper,  in  chief  a  tree 
eradicated  also  proper.     Motto — "  Labor  vincit." 

POLYNESIA,  See  of.     Barry  wavy  azure  and  argent,  on  a  cross  gules  a  mitre,  and 
in  the  first  quarter  a  range  of  mountains  below  three  stars. 
[Of  no  authority.] 


614 


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POLYNESIA,  SEE  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

POMERANIA,  Province  of  (Prussia).  Argent,  a  griffin  segreant  gules,  armed  or. 
Mantling — Gules  and  argent.  Crest — Out  of  a  coronet  or,  a  plume  of  peacock's 
feathers  proper.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  wild  man  wreathed  about  the  head  and 
middle  with  oak-leaves,  supporting  with  his  dexter  hand  a  banner  of  Prussia  ; 
(sinister)  a  man  in  complete  armour,  supporting  with  his  exterior  hand  a  banner 
of  Pomerania. 

PONTEFRACT  (Yorkshire).  Sable,  a  quadrangular  castle  with  four  towers  in 
perspective  argent,  masoned  proper,  the  base  of  the  escutcheon  water  azure. 

[Recorded,  College  of  Arms,  in  Glover's  "  Visitation  of  Yorkshire,"  taken  in 
the  year  1584.] 

POOLE  (Dorsetshire).  Barry  wavy  of  ten  a  dolphin  embowed,  and  in  chief  three 
escallops.  In  the  visitation  books  no  colours  are  given,  and  the  bars  are  of 
unequal  width.  The  editor  has  thought  it  better  in  this  case,  therefore,  to 
adhere  to  the  more  generally  quoted  blazon,  "  Gules,  three  bars  wavy  or 
(sometimes  argent,  three  bars  wavy  azure),  over  all  a  dolphin  naiant  embowed 
argent,  in  chief  three  escallops  gold."  Crest — Which  is  not  recorded,  but  which 
appears  on  the  seal,  a  mermaid  holding  in  her  dexter  hand  an  anchor  in  pale 
cabled,  without  a  beam,  her  sinister  hand  extended,  holding  a  ball  all  proper. 
Motto — "  Admorem  villae  de  Poole." 

POPLAR,  Borough  of  (London).  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  shows  a  device  of  three 
escutcheons,  thereon,  (a)  a  gateway,  {b)  a  bridge,  between  two  bars  on  each  a  bow 
stringed,  (c)  a  human  figure  vested,  the  right  hand  raised  in  benediction,  the 
sinister  holding  a  crosier. 

PORTADOWN  (Co.  Armagh).  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  and  none  are  claimed 
except  on  the  seal,  which,  within  the  legend  "  Portadown  Town  Commissioners, 
1883,"  displays  the  armorial  bearings  of  His  Grace  the  Duke  of  Manchester,  as 
follows  : — "  Quarterly  i  and  4,  argent,  three  lozenges  conjoined  in  fesse  gules, 
within  a  bordure  sable  (for  Montagu);  2  and  3,  or  an  eagle  displayed  vert, 
beaked  and  membered  gules  (for  Monthermer)."  Over  a  ducal  coronet  is  placed 
for  Crest — A  griffin's  head  or,  between  two  wings  sable.  (This  should  be  gorged 
with  a  collar  argent,  charged  with  three  lozenges  gules.)  Supporters — (Dexter) 
an  heraldic  antelope  or,  armed,  unguled,  and  tufted  argent,  (sinister)  a  griffin  with 
wings  elevated  or.  (This  should  be  collared  as  the  Crest.)  Motto — "  Dis- 
ponendo  me  non  mutando  me." 

PORT  AND  HARBOUR  COMMISSIONERS  (Londonderry).  Refer  to 
Londonderry. 

PORTARLINGTON  (Queen's  County).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

PORTCULLIS  PURSUIVANT  OF  ARMS.     Badge— h  portcullis  or. 


616 


^^^s^^^pp^^^ 


PONTEFRACT 


POMERANIA 


■:^) 


POOLE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PORT-GLASGOW  (Renfrewshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings. 
The  seal  represents  a  ship  of  three  masts  under  full  sail  upon  the  sea,  the  main- 
sail charged  with  a  tree,  a  fish,  a  bell,  and  a  bird,  being  the  arms  of  the  City  of 
Glasgow.  From  the  main-mast  flies  the  Union  Jack,  and  at  the  stern  the  banner 
of  St  Andrew.  Below  is  the  inscription,  "  Ter  et  quater  anno  revisens  aequor 
Atlanticum  impune,"  all  within  the  legend,  "Common  Seal  of  the  Towns  of 
Port-Glasgow  and  Newark." 

PORTOBELLO,  Parliamentary  Burgh  of  ( Edinburghshire).  Quarterly  first  and 
fourth,  azure,  a  three-masted  vessel  under  sail  or;  second  and  third,  argent,  a 
cannon  mounted  on  its  carriage  sable.  Above  the  shield  is  placed  a  suitable 
helmet  with  a  mantling  gules  doubled  argent,  and  on  a  wreath  of  the  proper 
liveries  is  set  for  Crest — A  tower  argent  masoned  sable,  and  on  an  escroll  over 
the  same  this  Motto — "  Ope  et  consilio." 

Matriculated  i8th  March  1886.     [The  portcullis  in  the  Crest  is  painted  gules 
in  the  Lyon  Register.] 


618 


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THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PORT  OF  LONDON  AUTHORITY.  Azure,  issuing  from  a  castle  argent,  a 
demi-man  vested,  holding  in  the  dexter  hand  a  drawn  sword,  and  in  the  sinister 
a  scroll  or,  the  one  representing  the  Tower  of  London,  the  other  the  figure  of 
St  Paul,  the  patron  saint  of  London.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  an 
ancient  ship  or,  the  main-sail  charged  with  the  arms  of  the  city  of  London. 
Supporters — On  either  side  a  sea-lion  argent,  crined,  finned,  and  tufted  or,  issuing 
from  waves  of  the  sea  proper,  that  to  the  dexter  grasping  the  banner  of  King 
Edward  II.,  that  to  the  sinister  the  banner  of  King  Edward  VII.  Motto — 
"  Floreat  imperii  portus."  Standard — Gules.  Badge — A  sea-lion  grasping  a 
trident  or. 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms  :  Arms  and  Crest,  August  23,  1909  ;  Supporters, 
August  26,  1909;  Standard  and  Badge,  August  30,  1909.] 


620 


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PORT  OF  LONDON  AUTHORITY  STANDARD 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PORTO  RICO,  Island  of.  Issuant  from  the  sea  in  base  the  sun  rising  fronn 
behind  mountains  (?  all  proper),  on  a  chief  per  fesse  (?  azure)  and  (?  or),  the 
latter  charged  with  six  pallets  gules,  the  staff  of  Mercury  erect  (?  proper) 
between,  on  the  dexter  side  a  branch  of  olive  and  on  the  sinister  a  branch 
of  (?)  all  within  a  bordure  also  or.  Crest — On  waves  of  the  sea  a  three-masted 
ship  in  full  sail.     Motto — "Prospera  lux  oritur." 

[These  arms  (without  any  verbal  blazon)  were  declared  by  proclamation 
by  William  N.  Hunt,  Governor,  23th  December  1901,  pursuant  to  an  Act  of 
the  Legislative  Assembly,  dated  31st  January  1901.] 

The  Porto  Rican  Legislature  in  1905,  however,  discarded  the  above  arms 
and  reverted  to  its  former  device,  granted  by  King  Ferdinand  V.  of  Spain 
in  151 1  which  may  be  blazoned  somewhat  as  follows  : — , 

...  an  Agnus  Dei  statant  on  a  Bible  resting  on  a  rock  issuant  from  waves 
of  the  sea,  in  chief  a  sheaf  of  five  arrows  in  saltire,  points  upwards,  surmounted 
by  a  bow  fesseways  between  the  letters  F  and  Y,  each  crowned,  the  whole 
of  the  foregoing  device  within  a  circle  inscribed  "  Johannes  est  nomen  ejus," 
the  circle  within  an  orle  of  castles,  towers,  and  flags  of  Spain  alternately  and 
a  bordure  gules. 

PORT-PIGHAM,  otherwise  West  Looe.     See  West  Looe. 

PORTRUSH  (Co.  Antrim).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in  Ulster's  Office. 
Lewis's  "  Topographical  Dictionary  "  gives  "  Gules,  an  anchor  in  pale  cabled  all 
proper." 

PORTSMOUTH  (Hants).  Azure,  a  crescent  or,  surmounted  by  an  estoile  of  the 
last. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

PORTSMOUTH  GRAMMAR  SCHOOL.  Uses  two  escutcheons  placed  accolle, 
viz.,  dexter,  the  arms  of  Portsmouth  (q.v.),  sinister,  sable  on  a  cross  engrailed 
argent,  a  lion  passant  guardant  gules  between  four  leopards'  faces  vert,  on  a 
chief  or,  a  rose  gules  between  two  birds  of  the  fourth.  Motto — "  Pra;mia  virtutis 
honores." 

PORTSOY.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  on  the  seal  are  argent,  a  lion 
rampant  guardant  gules,  holding  between  his  paws  a  plumb  rule  erect  proper. 


$22 


PORTO  RICO 


PORTO  RICO 


PORTRUSH 


PORTSMOUTH 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PORTUGAL,  Kingdom  of.  Argent,  five  escutcheons  in  cross  azure,  on  each  as 
many  plates  in  saltire,  all  within  a  bordure  gules,  thereon  seven  castles  or. 
Supporters — Two  dragons  proper  holding  banners  of  the  arms.  Crest — Out 
of  a  coronet  or,  the  head  and  wings  of  a  dragon  incensed  gules.  Mantling — 
Gules  and  or. 

\N.B. — The  crest  and  supporters  are  hardly  ever  made  use  of] 

POSEN  (Poland).  Gules,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert  a  castle  proper,  in  the  open 
gateway  a  key  in  bend  sinister  or,  surmounted  by  a  key  in  bend  argent,  from 
each  of  the  outer  towers  a  human  figure  habited,  the  head  within  a  glory  or  and 
the  sinister  figure  holding  in  his  dexter  hand  a  key  also  or,  in  chiel  an  eagle 
displayed  argent,  crowned  or. 

POSEN,  Province  of  (Prussia).  Argent,  an  eagle  displayed  sable,  crowned 
beaked,  legged,  and  with  sachsen  or,  holding  in  its  dexter  claw  a  sceptre,  and 
in  its  sinister  an  orb  proper,  and  on  its  breast,  surmounted  by  an  open  crown,  an 
escocheon  gules  charged  with  an  eagle  displayed  argent,  crowned  or.  Afantltfig 
— Gules  and  argent.  Crest — Out  of  a  coronet,  an  eagle  displayed  argent,  crowned 
or.  Crest — Out  of  a  crown  or  an  eagle  displayed  argent,  beaked  and  crowned 
or.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  savage  supporting  a  banner  of  Prussia  ;  (sinister)  a 
man  in  complete  armour,  on  his  head  a  plume  of  feathers,  argent  and  gules, 
supporting  a  banner  of  Posen  as  in  the  arms. 


$24 


POSEN  (POLAND) 


PORTUGAL 


Di.i; 


POSEN,  PROVINCE  OF  (PRUSSIA) 


ZR 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

POULTERS,   or   POULTERERS,   The   Worshipful    Company  of,    London. 

(Incorporated    23rd    February    1504.)     Argent,  on    a   chevron    between   three 
storks  azure,  as  many  swans  proper.     Crest — On  a  mural  crown  sable,  a  stork 
with  wings  expanded  gules.     Supporters — Two  pelicans  with  wings  endorsed  or 
vulning  their  breasts  proper.     Motto — "  Remember  your  oath." 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

PRAGUE  (Bohemia).  Gules,  a  tower,  triple-towered  or,  domed  argent,  in  the  open 
gateway  an  arm  in  armour  embowed  fesseways,  holding  in  the  hand  a  sword 
in  bend  sinister  all  proper. 

PRESBYTERIAN  CHURCH.     Refer  to  Church  of  Scotland. 

PRESSBURG  (Hungary).  Gules,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert,  a  tower  porte  ouverte 
proper,  from  the  battlements  three  turrets  also  proper,  domed  azure. 


6s6 


POULTERERS,  COMPANY  OF 


I  1 1  i^^^ 


PRAGUE 


PRESSBURG 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PRESTON  (Lancashire).  (Azure),  a  paschal  lamb  couchant,  with  the  banner  (all 
argent),  round  the  head  a  nimbus  (or),  and  in  the  base  the  letters  P.P.  (of  the 
last).  No  colours  are  given  in  the  visitation  books,  but  the  foregoing  are 
believed  to  be  correct.     The  legend  is  that  P.P.  stands  for  "  Proud  Preston." 

PRESTONPANS.     Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 

PRESTWICK.     Has  no  arms  and  its  seal  is  not  heraldic. 

PRETORIA,  Municipality  of  (Transvaal,  South  Africa).  Gules,  on  an  acacia 
tree  eradicated  proper  within  an  orle  of  eight  bees  volant  or,  an  inescutcheon  of 
the  last,  thereon  a  figure  representing  a  Roman  prsetor  seated  also  proper.  Crest 
— On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  triple-towered  castle  or.  Motto — "  Prsestantia 
praevaleat  pra^toria."  Supporters — On  the  dexter  side  an  eland,  and  on  the 
sinister  side  a  koedor,  both  proper. 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms.  February  7,  1907.] 

PRETORIA,  See  of.     Tierced  in  fesse  gules  argent  and  azure,  in  chief  the  lion  of 
England  supporting  the  Banner  of  St  George,  in  base  an  anchor  of  the  second. 
[Of  no  authority.] 


dzZ 


PRESTON 


PRETORIA,   SEE  OF 


PRETORIA 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PRINCE  EDWARD  ISLAND  (Dominion  of  Canada).  Argent,  on  an  island 
vert  to  the  sinister  an  oak-tree  fructed,  to  the  dexter  thereof  three  oak  saplings, 
sprouting  all  proper  on  a  chief  gules,  a  lion  passant  guardant  or.  Motto — 
"  Parva  sub  ingenti." 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  30th  May  1905.] 

PRINCE  OF  WALES  ISLAND  (otherwise  Penang).  Refer  to  Straits  Settle- 
ments. 

PRINTERS'  GUILD  (Vienna).  Or,  the  double-headed  eagle  of  the  Roman- 
German  Empire,  the  heads  each  within  a  nimbus  and  armed  gules,  holding  in 
the  dexter  claw  a  leaf-holder  and  in  the  sinister  a  composing-stick.  Mantling — 
Gules  and  argent.  Crest — Out  of  a  coronet,  a  denii-griffin  argent,  armed  gules, 
holding  in  its  claws  two  printing  balls,  one  above  the  other,  the  heads  conjoined. 

PRIVY-COUNCIL  OFFICE.  The  seal  of  office  represents  a  rose  and  a  thistle 
each  stalked,  leaved,  and  conjoined  to  one  stem  in  base  between  the  royal 
supporters  of  England,  the  lion  holding  the  rose  between  his  forefeet,  and  the 
unicorn  the  thistle.  The  supporters  standing  on  a  scroll,  with  the  words 
"  Sigill.  Priv.  Council "  ;  over  the  rose  and  thistle  the  regal  crown  of  England. 

PROCTERS.     Refer  to  Attorneys,  etc 

PROCURATORS,  FACULTY  OF,  IN  GLASGOW.  Gules,  the  figure  of 
St  Kentigern  affrontee,  vested  and  mitred,  his  right  hand  raised  in  the  act 
of  benediction,  and  having  in  his  left  hand  a  crosier,  between  two  branches  of 
laurel  disposed  orleways,  that  on  the  dexter  having  a  salmon  haurient  attached 
by  a  ring  in  its  mouth  thereto,  and  that  on  the  sinister  having  an  ancient  hand- 
bell suspended  from  it,  ensigned  with  a  robin-redbreast  all  proper.  On  an 
escroll  below  the  shield  this  inscription: — "The  Faculty  of  Procurators  in 
Glasgow." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  nth  March  1912.] 

PROVINCE  WELLESLEY.     Refer  to  Straits  Settlements. 

PRUDENTIAL  ASSURANCE  COMPANY,  LIMITED  (London).  Sable,  three 
bars  embattled  or,  within  two  flaunches  argent,  each  charged  with  three  martlets 
in  pale  gules.  Crest — A  female  figure  proper,  vested  argent,  cloaked  and  girdled 
gules,  resting  the  sinister  arm  on  the  trunk  of  an  oak-tree  eradicated  and  sprout- 
ing, thereon  an  hour-glass,  and  holding  in  the  dexter  hand  a  mirror  which  she  is 
regarding,  and  in  the  sinister  an  arrow  entwined  by  a  serpent  all  proper.  Motto 
— "  Fortis  qui  prudens." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  March  15,  1904.] 


630 


PRINCE  EDWARD  ISLAND 


PROCURATORS,  FACULTY  OF,  IN  GLASGOW 


FORTiSQUt-  PRUOENSl^g 

tms ^^" 

PRUDENTIAL  ASSURANCE  COMPANY 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PRUSSIA,  Kingdom  of.  Usually  the  following  is  made  use  of: — Argent,  an  eagle 
displayed  sable,  beaked,  legged  and  crowned  or,  and  with  sachsen  or  holding  in 
the  dexter  claw  a  sceptre  and  in  the  sinister  an  orb,  and  charged  on  the  breast 
with  the  cypher  F.R.  Above  the  shield  is  placed  the  Royal  Crown.  The  crest 
is  seldom  used,  but  is  "out  of  a  coronet  a  demi-eagle  as  in  the  arms."  The 
Supporters  are  two  savages  proper,  wreathed  about  the  waist  with  leaves  vert. 
Motto — "Gott  mit  uns." 

The  "  middle  "  shield,  which  is  illustrated,  shows  some  of  the  quarterings. 
But  the  greater  shield  of  the  kingdom  consists  of  forty-eight  quarterings  and 
three  inescutcheons.  The  German  method  of  numbering  is  different  from  the 
British,  and  the  following  description  is  numbered  in  the  British  way  from 
dexter  to  sinister.  The  forty-eight  quarterings  are  arranged  in  eight  rows  of  six 
as  follows : — 

I.  Westphalia,  gules,  a  horse  saliant  argent.  2.  Posen,  argent,  a  Prussian 
eagle,  on  its  breast  an  escutcheon  gules  surmounted  by  an  open  crown,  and 
charged  with  an  eagle  displayed  argent,  crowned  or.  3.  SiLESL'V,  or,  an  eagle 
displayed  sable,  crowned  and  armed  of  the  field,  on  its  breast  and  wings  a 
crescent  and  crosslet  conjoined  argent.  4.  The  Lower  Rhine  or  Rhineland, 
argent,  the  Prussian  eagle  charged  on  the  breast  with  an  escutcheon  vert,  charged 
with  a  bend  wavy  of  the  field,  and  surmounted  by  an  open  crown.  5.  Saxony, 
barry  of  ten  or  and  sable,  a  crown  of  rue  in  bend  vert.  6.  Engern,  argent, 
three  "Seeblatter"  leaves  gules.     7.  MAGDEBURG,  per  fesse  gules  and  argent. 

8.  HOLSTEIN,  gules,  an  inescutcheon  per  fesse  argent  and  of  the  field  within 
three  nettle-leaves,  and    as    many    passion    nails    alternately  disposed  in   orle. 

9.  POMERANIA,  argent,  a  griffin  segreant  gules,  armed  or.  10.  LUNEBUKG,  or, 
seme  of  hearts  gules,  a  lion  rampant  azure.  11.  SCHLESWIG,  or,  two  lions 
passant  in  pale  azure.  12.  Bremen,  gules,  two  keys  in  saltire,  wards  upwards 
argent,  in  chief  a  cross  patee  fitchee  at  the  foot  of  the  last.  13.  Wenden, 
argent,  a  griffin  segreant  bendy  sinister  of  six  gules  and  vert.  14.  JULIERS,  or, 
a  lion  rampant  sable.  15.  Gelders,  azure,  a  lion  rampant  or.  16.  Cleves 
gules,  an  escarbuncle  or,  the  centre  thereof  an  inescutcheon  argent.  17.  Berg, 
argent,  a  lion  rampant  gules,  crowned  azure.  18.  Casubia,  or,  a  griffin  segreant 
sable.  19.  Thuringia,  azure,  a  lion  rampant  barry  of  eight  gules  and  argent 
crowned  or.  20.  MECKLENBURG,  or,  a  bull's  head  and  neck  erased  sable,  armed 
and  ringed  argent,  crowned  gules.  21.  KRO.SSEN,  or,  an  eagle  displayed  sable, 
charged  on  the  breast  and  wings  with  a  crescent  argent.  22.  Lauenberg,  gules, 
a  horse's  head    couped  argent  within    a    bordure    compony  argent    and    sable. 

23.  Hesse,  azure,  a  lion  rampant  barry  of  eight  argent  and  gules,  crowned  or. 

24.  Ober-Lausitz,  per  fesse  embattled  azure  and  masonry  or.  25.  Per  pale 
{a)  Paderborn,  gules,  a  cross  or ;  [b)  Pyrmont,  argent,  a  cross  moline  gules. 
26.  RUGEN,  per  fesse  or  and  azure,  issuant  in  chief  a  demi-lion  rampant  double 
queued  sable,  crowned  gules,  in  base  five  stones  fesseways  conjoined  in  a  pyramid, 
one,  two  and  two  gules.  27.  NiEDER  Lausitz,  argent,  an  ox  statant  gules. 
28.  Oranien,  or,  a  bugle-horn   azure,  garnished    of  the    field,  stringed  gules. 

632 


PRUSSIA 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

29.  East  Friesland,  sable,  a  harpy  (jung  frauen-adler)  between  four  stars  or. 

30.  Halberstadt,  per  pale  argent  and  gules.  31.  Verden,  argent,  a  cross-patee 
sable  fitche  at  the  foot.  32.  OSNABURG,  argent,  a  wheel  gules.  33.  MUNSTER, 
azure,  a  fesse  or.  34.  MiNDEN,  gules,  two  keys  in  saltire,  wards  upwards,  argent. 
35.  HiLDESHEIM,  per  pale  gules  and  or.  36.  Cammin,  gules,  a  cross  moline 
argent.  17.  Glatz,  gules,  two  bends  sinister  arched  or.  38.  MORS,  or,  a  fesse 
sable.  39.  Fulda,  argent,  a  cross  sable.  40.  NASSAU,  azure,  billette  and  a  lion 
rampant  crowned  or.  41.  Henneberg,  or,  on  a  mount  vert  a  hen  sable,  combed 
gules.  42.  Per  pale  {a)  Mark,  or,  a  fesse  chequy  gules  and  argent :  {b)  Ravens- 
BERG,  argent,  three  chevronels  gules.  43.  VeringEN,  or,  three  stags'  horns 
fesseways  in  pale  azure.  44.  Mansfeld,  argent  six  lozenges  conjoined  through- 
out gules.  45.  HOHENSTEIN,  barry  of  four  gules  and  argent,  a  pale  counter- 
changed.  46.  Per  pale  {a)  TecKLENBERG,  argent,  three  hearts  gules ;  {b)  LiNGEN, 
azure,  an  anchor  or.  47.  SiGMARlNGEN,  azure,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert,  a  stag 
trippant  or.  48.  Frankfurt,  gules,  an  eagle  displayed  argent,  armed  or.  The 
point  of  the  shield  in  base  is  gules.  Over  the  quarterings  on  the  central  palar  line 
are  three  inescutcheons,  in  the  centre  the  arms  of  Prussia,  i.e.  argent,  an  eagle  dis- 
played sable  armed,  crowned,  and  charged  on  the  breast  and  wings  with  sachsen, 
and  the  cypher  F.R.,  holding  in  the  dexter  claw  a  sceptre  and  in  the  sinister  an 
orb.  This  inescutcheon  is  crowned  with  the  Prussian  Crown.  The  second 
inescutcheon  is  that  of  Brandenberg,  viz.,  argent,  an  eagle  displayed  gules,  crowned 
with  an  electoral  bonnet,  the  wings  having  sachsen  or,  on  the  breast  an  escutcheon 
azure,  thereon  a  sceptre  in  pale  or.  This  inescutcheon  is  surmounted  by  an 
electoral  bonnet.  The  third  inescutcheon  in  base  is  per  fesse  in  chief  or,  a  lion 
passant  sable,  crowned  gules,  within  a  bordure  compony  argent  and  gules  for 
Nuremburg,  in  base  quarterly  argent  and  sable  for  HOHENZOLLERN.  This 
inescutcheon  is  surmounted  by  a  prince's  crown 

Above  the  shield  is  an  open  helmet  gold,  lined  red,  with  a  mantling  sable, 
lined  argent,  and  upon  the  helmet  the  Prussian  crown.  Supporters — On  either 
side  a  wild  man,  wreathed  about  the  head  and  middle  with  oak  leaves,  and  each 
supporting  in  his  exterior  hand  a  banner,  the  dexter  of  Prussia,  the  sinister  of 
Brandenburg.  The  pavilion  is  crimson  seme  alternately  of  golden  crowns  and 
black  eagles,  and  is  lined  with  ermine.  On  a  blue  riband,  thereon  is  the  Motto— 
"Gott  mit  uns,"  the  pavilion  also  being  surmounted  by  the  Prussian  crown, 
behind  which  rises  a  staff,  and  depending  therefrom  a  forked  pennon  of  Prussia. 

PRUSSIA,  EAST  (Province  of).  Argent,  an  eagle  displayed  sable,  crowned, 
beaked,  legged,  and  with  sachsen  or,  holding  in  the  dexter  claw  a  sceptre  and 
in  the  sinister  an  orb  proper,  and  charged  on  the  breast  with  a  cypher  or.  Mant- 
ling—^-dkA^  and  argent.  Crest — On  a  coronet  or,  an  eagle  displayed  as  in  the  arms. 
Stipporters—{T)exter)  a  wild  man  wreathed  about  the  head  and  middle  with  oak- 
leaves  ;  (sinister)  a  man  in  complete  armour,  each  holding  in  his  exterior  hand  a 
banner  of  the  arms. 


634 


PRUSSIA,  EAST 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

PRUSSIA,  WEST  (Province  of).  Argent,  an  eagle  displayed  sable,  armed  or, 
about  the  neck  a  coronet,  and  issuant  therefrom  to  the  dexter,  a  dexter  arm  in 
armour  embowed,  brandishing  in  the  hand  a  sword,  all  proper.  Mantling — Sable 
and  argent.  Crest — Out  of  a  coronet  or  a  demi-eagle  as  in  the  arms.  Supporters 
— (Dexter)  a  wild  man  wreathed  about  the  head  and  middle  with  oak-leaves,  and 
supporting  in  his  exterior  hand  a  banner  of  Prussia  ;  (sinister)  a  man  in  complete 
armour,  supporting  with  his  exterior  hand  a  banner  of  West  Prussia. 

PUDSEY,  Borough  of  (Yorkshire).  Argent,  on  a  chevron  vert,  between  two 
pairs  of  shuttles  saltirewise  in  chief  and  a  woolpack  in  base  proper,  three  mullets 
pierced  or,  all  within  a  bordure  engrailed  gules,  charged  with  eight  roses  of  the 
field.     Motto — "  Be  just  and  fear  not." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  1901.] 

These  arms  are  based  upon  those  of  the  family  of  Pudsey. 

PWLLHELI  (Carnarvonshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  following  is, 
however,  attributed  to  the  Town  :  "...  On  a  mount  an  elephant  passant,  on 
his  back  a  castle,  his  trunk  extended  between  two  palm-trees  all  proper."  This, 
of  course,  is  taken  from  the  common  seal,  which  shows  this  design,  with  the 
legend,  "  Sigillum  communitis  ville  de  Porthely." 


636 


w^^^^^^*/-^-^^ 


PRUSSIA,  WEST 


PWLLHELI 


PUDSEY 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

QU'APPELLE,  See  of  (Canada).     Ermine,  a  passion  cross  gules,  on  a  chief  azure, 
the  sun  rising  irradiated  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

QUEBEC,  Province  of  (Dominion  of  Canada).  Or,  on  a  fesse  gules,  between  two 
fleurs-de-lis  azure  in  chief,  and  a  sprig  of  three  leaves  of  maple  vert  in  base,  a 
lion  passant  guardant  or. 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  1869.] 

QUEBEC,  See  of  Per  fesse  wavy  azure  and  gules,  in  chief  a  book  open  proper, 
clasped  and  ornamented  gold,  upon  the  book  a  crosier  in  bend  or,  in  base  a 
lion  passant  guardant  of  the  fourth,  holding  in  the  dexter  paw  a  key  erect  argent, 
on  a  canton  of  the  last  a  cross  of  the  second  between  four  crosses  patee  fitchde 
sable. 

[College  of  Arms.     Gts.,  xviii.  252.] 

QUEENBOROUGH  (Kent).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents 
upon  a  mount  a  double  castle,  and  from  the  upper  battlements  the  bust  of  a 
woman  affrontee,  the  hair  dishevelled  and  ducally  crowned. 

QUEEN  CHARLOTTE  ISLANDS.  No  warrant  assigning  arms  has  ever  been 
issued  for  Queen  Charlotte  Islands,  which  are  now  included  in  the  province  of 
British  Columbia. 


638 


QU'APPELLE,  SEE  OF 


QUEBEC,  SEE  OF 


QUEBEC,  PROVINCE  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

QUEEN  ELIZABETH'S  HOSPITAL  AT  BRISTOL.  Gules,  on  waves  of 
the  sea  with  dolphins'  heads  therein  proper,  the  bow  of  a  ship  with  cupola 
argent,  garnished  or,  issuant  out  of  a  port  on  the  sinister  silver,  with  mount  vert 
impaling  [the  arms  of  John  Carre]  Gules,  on  a  chevron  argent,  three  estoiles 
sable,  in  chief  a  martlet  or,  over  all  on  a  chief  azure  a  lion  passant  guardant 
between  two  fleurs-de-lis  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  on  the  stump  of 
a  tree  couped  and  eradicated,  entwined  by  a  serpent  proper,  a  bird,  wings 
endorsed  argent.  Supporters — On  each  side  a  sea-horse  proper,  ducally  gorged 
and  crined  or. 

[College  of  Arms.     Granted  b}-  Cooke,  Clarenceux,  1591.] 

QUEEN'S  COLLEGE  (Cambridge).  Founded  in  1441  by  Margaret  of  Anjou, 
Queen  of  Henry  VI.  Quarterly  of  six,  ist,  barry  of  eight  argent  and  gules,  2nd, 
azure  sem<^e-de-lis  or,  a  label  of  three  points  throughout  argent ;  3rd,  azure  a  cross 
potent  cantoned  with  four  similar  crosses  or;  4th,  azure,  semde-de-lis  or,  a  bordure 
gules  ;  5th,  azure  semee  of  crosses  crosslet  or,  two  barbels  haurient  and  endorsed 
of  the  last ;  6th,  or,  on  a  bend  gules,  three  allerions  displayed  argent,  the  whole 
within  a  bordure  vert,  being  the  arms  of  Margaret  of  Anjou.  Crest — In  a  coronet 
of  gold  an  eagle  rousant  sable,  wings  or. 

[These  arms  and  crest  were  granted  to  the  College  in  1576.] 

QUEENS  COLLEGE  (Oxford).  (Founded  in  1340  by  Robert  Eglesfield,  Con- 
fessor to  Queen  Philippa,  wife  of  Edward  HI.)  Argent  three  eagles  displayed 
gules,  beaked  and  legged. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms,  Visitation  of  Oxford,  1574.] 
The  seal  of  the  College  represents  an  eagle  reguardant  with  wings  expanded, 
resting  the  dexter  claw  on  a  carved  shield  bearing  the  arms  of  the  founder,  viz., 
Azure  three  leopards'  faces  or,  on  a  chief  embattled  ermine,  round  the  seal  the 
words, "  The  Common  Seal  of  Mitchel's  Visitors  "  ;  and  on  the  exergue, "  Queen's 
College,  Oxon." 

QUEEN'S  COLLEGE,  CORK.  Per  pale  gules  and  azure,  on  the  dexter  side  a 
lion  statant  guardant  imperially  crowned  or,  on  the  sinister  side  three  Eastern 
crowns  proper ;  on  a  chief  of  the  third  an  ancient  ship  between  two  castles 
in  fesse  of  the  first,  in  the  centre  chief  point  of  the  achievement  an  open  book 
argent,  garnished  of  the  third.  Motto — "  Where  Findbarr  taught,  Let  Munster 
learn." 

[Granted  by  Ulster  King  of  Arms,  191 2.     For  illustration  see  "  University 
College,  Cork."] 

QUEEN'S  COUNTY.     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 


640 


QUEEN  ELIZABETH'S  HOSPITAL  AT  BRISTOL 


QUEEN'S  COLLEGE  (OXFORD) 


QUEEN'S  COLLEGE  (CAMBRIDGE) 


2S 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

QUEENSFERRY  (Linlithgowshire).  The  entry  in  Lyon  Register  is  as  follows  : — 
"  The  Royal!  Burgh  of  Oiiensferrie  gives  for  Eiisigncs  Armorial,  Argent  in  y^  Sea 
azur  a  Gallic  with  her  Saills  trussed  up  sable,  on  y'=  midle  part  thereof  Queen 
Margaret  of  Scotland  standing  richlie  apparrelled  and  crowned  proper,  holding 
in  her  dexter  hand  a  Scepter  Ensigned  with  a  flower  de  lis  or,  and  in  her 
Sinister,  lying  on  her  breast,  a  book  folded  purpure,  with  these  words  in  ane 
Escroll  underneath,  Insignia  Burgi  passagii  Reginas." 

QUEENSLAND  (Commonwealth  of  Australia).  Per  fesse  the  chief  or,  the  base 
per  pale  sable  and  gules,  in  chief  a  bull's  head  caboshed  in  profile  muzzled  and 
a  merino  ram's  head  respecting  each  other  proper,  the  dexter  base  charged  with 
a  garb  of  the  first,  and  the  sinister  base  on  a  mount,  a  pile  of  quartz 
issuant  therefrom  a  gold  pyramid,  in  front  of  the  mount  a  spade  surmounted  by 
a  pick  saltirewise  all  proper.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  mount, 
thereon  a  Maltese  cross  azure,  surmounted  with  our  imperial  crown  between  two 
sugar-canes  proper.     Motto — "Audax  et  fidelis." 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  191 1.  Refer  to  Australia.  The  device  of 
the  Maltese  cross  and  crown  formerly  in  use  and  now  incorporated  in  the  crest 
of  Queensland  and  in  the  arms  of  Australia  is  the  device  upon  the  Union  flag 
flown  by  the  Governor.] 

QUEENSLAND,    NORTH,    See    of.     Azure,   a   Paschal    lamb    passant   proper 
between  three  cross  crosslets  fitchee. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

QUEENSTOWN,  Town  Commissioners  of  (Co.  Cork).  Argent,  a  ship  of  war  in 
full  sail,  from  the  masthead  the  royal  standard  of  the  United  Kingdom  of  Great 
Britain  and  Ireland,  all  proper  ;  in  the  centre  chief  point  a  harp  ensigned  with 
the  imperial  crown  also  proper,  between  in  fesse  two  trefoils  slipped  vert.  Motto 
— "Nomine  reginJE  statio  fidissima  classi." 

Granted  1870  by  Sir  J.  Bernard  Burke,  Ulster  King  of  Arms.  The  foregoing 
is  his  blazon,  but  the  editor  suggests  as  a  better  (for  the  latter  part),  "  In  chief 
a  harp  ensigned  with  the  imperial  crown  also  proper,  between  two  trefoils 
slipped  vert." 

QUEEN'S  UNIVERSITY  OF  BELFAST.     Refer  to  University. 


642 


QUEENSFERRY 


QUEENSTOWN,  TOWN  COMMISSIONERS  OF 


QUEENSLAND 


QUEENSLAND,  NORTH,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

RADLEY,  St  Peter's  College.  Argent,  an  open  book  garnished  gules,  clasps  and 
buckles  or,  thereon  inscribed  the  words,  "  Sicut  serpentes  sicut  columbas,"  between 
three  crosses  patee  of  the  second,  on  a  chief  of  the  last  a  key  in  bend  sinister  of 
the  first,  surmounted  by  a  similar  key  in  bend  dexter  gold,  between  to  the  dexter 
a  serpent  nowed  and  erect,  and  to  the  sinister  a  dove  both  proper. 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  May  14,  1908.] 

RADNORSHIRE.      Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

RADNOR  (Radnorshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  but  the  following  are  quoted 
by  Burke's  "  General  Armory  "  : — "  Barry  of  six  or  and  az.  on  a  chief  of  the  last 
two  palets  betw.  as  many  gyrons  of  the  first."  This  coat  is  probably  taken  from 
that  of  Mortimer,  which,  as  blazoned  in  Woodward  and  Burnett's  "  Treatise  on 
Heraldry,"  is  as  follows  : — "  Barry  of  six  or  and  azure  on  a  chief  of  the  first  two 
pallets  between  two  gyrons  of  the  second,  over  all  an  inescutcheon  argent." 

RAGUSA.     Argent,  three  bends  azure. 

RAILWAY.     Refer  to  Great  Central  Railway. 

RALEGH,  City  of  (Colony  of  Virginia).  Argent,  a  cross  gules,  in  the  first  quarter 
a  roebuck  statant  proper. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

RAMSEY  (Isle  of  Man).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

RAMSGATE  (Kent).  Quarterly  gules  and  azure,  a  cross  parted  and  fretty  argent 
between  a  horse  rampant  of  the  last  in  the  first  quarter,  a  demi-lion  passant 
guardant  of  the  third  conjoined  to  the  hulk  of  a  ship  or  in  the  second,  a  dolphin 
naiant  proper  in  the  third,  and  a  lymphad  also  or  in  the  fourth.  And  for  the 
Crest — -Issuant  from  a  naval  crown  or,  a  pier-head,  thereon  a  lighthouse,  both 
proper.  Motto — "  Salus  naufragis  salus  sgris." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  23rd  July  18S4.] 


644 


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RAGUSA 


RAM  SG ATE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

RANGOON,  See  of.     Argent,  issuing  from  a  mount  in  base  a  palm  tree,  the  trunk 
surmounted  by  an  escutcheon  charged  with  a  sword   in  bend  interlaced  with 
two  keys  addorsed,  wards  upwards,  in  bend  sinister. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

RAPHOE,  See  of.     Ermine,  a  chief  per  pale  azure  and  or,  in  the  dexter  the  sun  in 
splendour  of  the  last,  and  in  the  sinister  a  cross  pattee  gules. 

[This  coat,  which  is  recorded  in  Ulster's  Office,  remains  in  use,  but  through 
the  disestablishment  of  the  Irish  Church  it  is  really  extinct  and  its  present  use 
is  illegal.] 

RAPHOE.     Refer  to  Derry  and  Raphoe,  Bishop  of 
RASCIA.     Azure,  three  horse-shoes  inverted  argent. 

RATTRAY.     Has  no  arms.     Those  upon  the  seal  are  a  modification  of  the  arms 
of  the  family  of  Clerk-Rattray,  and  are.  Azure,  three  cross  crosslets  fitchee  or. 
Crest — A  cross  crosslet  fitchee  between  two  mullets.    Supporters — Two  serpents. 
[Of  no  authority.] 


646 


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T  T  V  •;• 


•:•   •?•    • 


V.V  T    T  V 


RANGOON,  SEE  OF 


RAPHOE,  SEE  OF 


RATTRAY 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

RAVENNA  (Italy).  Per  pale  or  and  gules,  on  a  mount  vert  issuing  in  base  a  poplar 
tree  proper  supported  by  two  lions  rampant  counterchanged  of  the  field. 

RAWTENSTALL  (Lancashire).  Or,  on  a  fesse  gules,  between  two  stags  trippant 
at  gaze  in  chief  proper  and  a  mount  in  base  vert,  thereon  two  cows  grazing  and 
respecting  each  other  sable,  a  wolf  current  of  the  first  between  two  bales  of  wool 
of  the  third,  in  the  chief  point  a  sinister  hand  couped  at  the  wrist  of  the  second. 
Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  upon  a  mount  a  squirrel  sejant  cracking  a  nut 
between  two  sprigs  of  the  cotton-tree,  slipped,  leaved,  and  fructed,  all  proper. 
Motto — "  Floret  qui  laborat." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  i6th  July  1891.] 

READING  (Berkshire).  (Azure),  five  heads  in  saltire  couped  at  the  neck  (proper 
crined  or),  the  centre  head  ducally  crowned  (of  the  last). 

According  to  Berry,  these  arms  were  granted  by  Camden,  Clarenceux 
King  of  Arms,  in  the  year  1566,  and  subsequently  confirmed  by  Hervey, 
Clarenceux  King  of  Arms  ;  but  Berry  states  that  the  centre  head  is  between  the 
letters  R  and  E,  and  Debrett's  "  House  of  Commons  "  so  gives  it.  The  entry 
made  at  the  time  of  visitations  is  simply  a  drawing  of  the  seal,  which  shows  the 
five  heads  in  saltire  without  any  tinctures  being  marked,  and  having  the  legend, 
"Communitatis  Radingie,"  but  the  said  drawing  is  distinctly  labelled,  "  These 
are  the  Armes  apperteyninge,"  etc. 

The  arms,"  Azure,  three  escallop-shells  or,"-have  frequently  been  attributed 
to  the  town,  but  these  are  the  arms  of  Reading  Abbey.  The  escallop-shell  in 
the  remote  ages  was  the  peculiar  badge  of  a  "  palmer,"  and  it  is  a  curious 
coincidence  that  to  a  family  of  the  name  of  "  Palmer"  Reading  should  owe  so 
much  of  its  present  prosperity. 

READING,  UNIVERSITY  EXTENSION  COLLEGE.  Per  fesse  gules  and  sable, 
in  chief  three  escallops  fessewise  or  and  in  base  on  a  cross  engrailed  argent,  a 
rose  of  the  first,  barbed  and  seeded  proper. 

[Granted  7th  August  1896.] 

The  engrailed  cross  was  suggested  by  the  arms  of  Christ  Church,  Oxford, 
and  the  escallops  by  the  arms  of  Reading  Abbey. 

READING  SCHOOL.  Uses  the  arms  of  the  town  of  Reading.  Motto— ''  hr?. 
mercede  viget." 

REDFORD.     See  East  Redford. 

RED  RIVER  SETTLEMENT.     Refer  to  Manitoba. 


648 


RAVENNA 


READING 


RAWTENSTALL 


READING,  UNIVERSITY  EXTENSION  COLLEGE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

REIGATE  (Surrey).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal,  the  design  upon  which 
is  sometimes  quoted  as  the  "  Arms  "  of  the  town,  represents  in  front  of  a  tree  an 
embattled  gateway  with  portcullis,  and  below  is  the  motto,  "  Never  wonne  ne 
never  shall."  In  the  gateway  below  the  portcullis  are  the  letters  REI.  Over 
the  battlements  is  an  escutcheon  chequy,  and  on  either  side  is  an  escutcheon 
bearing  a  monogram. 

REMEMBRANCER  OF  THE   EXCHEQUER,  Office  of  the  King's.     Or,  a 
chevron  gules,  a  bordure  gobony  argent  and  azure,  a  canton  ermine. 
[Of  no  authority.     Refer  to  Stafford's  Inn.] 

RENFREW,  Commissioners  of  Supply  for  the  County  of.  Ensigns  armorial: 
Azure,  a  lymphad  sails  furled  argent,  on  a  shield  or  pendent  therefrom  a  fess 
chequy  of  the  first  and  second.  Above  the  shield  is  placed  an  esquire's  helmet 
with  a  mantling  gules  doubled  argent,  and  issuing  out  of  a  wreath  of  the  proper 
liveries  is  set  for  Crest — A  demi-lion  rampant  gules  armed  and  langued  azure, 
and  in  an  escroll  over  the  same  this  Motto — "Avito  viret  honore." 
[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  the  nth  day  of  March  1889.] 

RENFREW  (Renfrewshire).  The  entry  in  Lyon  Register  is  as  follows : — The 
Royall  Burgh  of  Renfrew  gives,  In  the  sea  proper,  a  ship  with  her  sailes 
trussed  up  and  mast  and  tacklings,  the  prow  ensign'd  with  the  sun  and  the 
starne  with  the  moon  crescent,  all  argent,  betwixt  two  escutcheons  in  the  honour 
point  and  that  on  the  dexter  charged  with  a  lyon  rampant  with  a  double  tressure 
and  counter-flowered  gules,  being  the  royall  coat,  that  on  the  sinister  with  a 
fess  cheque  azur  and  argent  as  the  coat  of  Stewart,  and  betwixt  alse  many  cross 
crosslets  fitched  of  the  second.  The  Motto,  "  Deus  gubernat  navem." 
The  colour  of  the  field  is  not  stated  in  Lyon  Register. 

REPTON  SCHOOL.  Azure,  a  fesse  engrailed  between  three  doves,  each  holding 
in  its  beak  a  cross  forme  fitche  all  or. 

[Of  no  authority,  being  the  arms  of  Sir  John  Port,  the  founder.] 

RETFORD,  East.     See  East  Retford. 


650 


RENFREW,  COMMISSIONERS  OF  SUPPLY  FOR 


OTC. 

p,  r, '  ' 


REPTON  SCHOOL 


RENFREW 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

REUSS,  Principality  of.  Quarterly :  i  and  4,  sable,  a  lion  rampant  or,  crowned 
gules;  2  and  3,  argent,  a  stork  or.  Crests — i.  On  a  crown,  a  plume  of  ostrich 
feathers ;  2,  a  dog's  head  per  pale  argent  and  sable  ;  3,  a  stork  bendy  or,  argent 
and  gules.  Supporters — Two  lions  regardant  per  fesse  sable  and  argent.  Motto 
— "  Ich  bau  auf  Gott." 

REVAL  (Russia).     Or,  three  lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  azure,  crowned  gold. 

REVELS,  Master  of  in  Scotland.     Argent,  a  lady  rising  out  of  a  cloud  in  the 
nombril  point  richly  apparelled,  on  her  head  a  garland  of  ivy,  holding  in  her 
right  hand  a  poniziard  crowned,  and  in  the  left  a  vizard  all  proper,  standing  under 
a  veil  or  canopy  azure,  garnished  or,  in  base  a  thistle  vert. 
[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register.] 

REVELS,  in  Ireland.  Refer  to  "  Office  of  Jests,  Revells,  and  Masques  of  our 
Lord  the  King  in  Ireland." 

REVENUE,  Farmers  of  (Ireland).     Refer  to  Farmers  of  Revenue. 

RHEIMS  (France).  Argent,  two  branches  of  laurel  intertwined  proper,  fructed 
gules,  a  chief  azure,  seme-de-lis  or. 

RHINELAND,  Province  of  (Prussia).  Argent,  the  Prussian  eagle,  on  its  breast  a 
crowned  inescutcheon  vert,  thereon  a  bend  wavy  of  the  field.  Crest — Out  of  a 
crown  or  two  wings  vert,  each  charged  with  a  bend  wavy  argent.  Supporters — 
(Dexter)  a  savage  supporting  a  banner  of  Prussia ;  (sinister)  a  man  in  complete 
armour,  supporting  a  banner  of  the  Province  as  above. 

RHODE  ISLAND,  U.S.A.  (State  Device.)  Supported  on  the  waves  of  the  sea,  a 
shield  charged  with  an  anchor  and  cable,  erect ;  on  a  scroll  over  if  the  word 
"  Hope." 

RHODES  UNIVERSITY  COLLEGE.  Or,  on  a  pile  sable,  an  open  book 
inscribed  with  the  words  "  Sapientiam  exquiret  sapiens"  between  three  escallops 
of  the  first,  on  a  chief  argent,  a  lion  passant  gules,  between  two  thistles  slipped 
and  leaved  proper.  Crest — Upon  a  rock  the  figure  of  a  man  mounted  on  a 
horse,  representing  "  Energy,"  all  argent.  Motto — "  Vis  virtus  Veritas." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  5th  May  191 3.] 

RHODESIA.     Refer  to  the  arms  of  the  British  South  Africa  Company. 


652 


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RHINELAND 


RHODES  UNIVERSITY  COLLEGE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
RICHMOND,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

RICHMOND  HERALD.  Badge — A  rose  gules,  dimidiated  with  a  rose  argent, 
en  soleil,  crowned  with  the  imperial  crown. 

RICHMOND  (Surrey),  Borough  of.  Per  fesse  gules  and  azure,  on  a  fesse  ermine 
a  representation  of  the  ancient  Palace  of  Richmond  proper,  between  two 
roses  of  the  first,  barbed  and  seeded  of  the  fourth  ;  in  chief  a  lion  passant 
guardant  between  two  portcullises  or,  and  in  base  upon  water  proper  a  swan 
argent.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  upon  a  mount  a  stag  regardant 
proper,  holding  in  the  mouth  a  sprig  of  two  roses,  one  argent  and  the  other 
gules,  leaved  and  slipped  proper,  resting  the  dexter  fore-leg  on  an  escocheon 
or,  charged  with  a  chaplet  of  oak  vert.     Motto—"  A  deo  et  rege." 

Granted  by  Sir  Albert  William  Woods,  Knt.,  Garter  Principal  King  of 
Arms,  Walter  Aston  Blount,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms,  George  E.  Cokayne, 
Norroy  King  of  Arms,  19th  June  1S91. 

RICHMOND  (Yorkshire).     Gules,  an  ode  argent,  over  all  a  bend  ermine. 

Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.  Upon  the  seal  bearing  the  above  coat 
the  escutcheon  is  surmounted  by  a  crowned  rose.  This  is  frequently  quoted  as 
a  crest,  the  rose  gules  crowned  or,  and  is  so  given  in  Burke's  "  General  Armory." 
For  the  following  very  interesting  description  of  the  common  seal  I  am  indebted 
to  the  Town-Clerk  : — "The  Common  Seal,  which  is  doubtless  the  oldest  of  all, 
and  which  can  be  traced  back  as  far  as  the  earliest  grants,  is  the  effigy  of  a 
venerable  old  man,  with  a  long  beard  and  a  glory  round  his  head,  placed  in  a 
canopied  shrine  or  tabernacle  of  Gothic  structure,  his  cloak  closed  at  the  neck 
but  thrown  open  before  by  his  hands,  which  disclose  a  crucifix  hanging  from  his 
neck.  On  the  dexter  side  of  the  tabernacle-work  in  which  he  is  enshrined  are 
the  Arms  of  France  and  England  quartered,  and  on  the  sinister  those  of  John  I., 
Earl  of  Richmond,  chequers  or  and  azure,  a  canton  ermine  ;  which  seems  to  fix 
the  time  of  its  being  first  used  as  a  badge  of  incorporation  to  the  year  1268, 
when  John  confirmed  their  privileges.  Round  it  in  black  letter,  '  Sigillum  .  Co'e. 
Burgensiu'  .  Richmond.'" 

RIDINGS  (East,  West,  and  North,  of  the  County  of  Yorkshire).     See  Yorkshire. 

RIGA  (Russia).  Azure,  on  a  compartment  or,  in  front  of  a  double-headed  eagle 
displayed  sable,  crowned  and  armed  or,  a  castellated  gateway  gules,  on  each 
tower  a  banner  or  and  in  the  open  gateway  a  lion's  face  crowned,  also  or,  above 
the  castle  two  keys  addorsed  in  saltire  wards  upwards  surmounted  by  a  cross 
patt6e  or,  on  the  centre  chief  point  the  Russian  imperial  crown. 


654 


RICHMOND  (YORKSHIRE) 


RICHMOND  (SURREY) 


RIGA 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

RIPON  (Yorkshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  a  bugle- 
horn  stringed,  the  mouthpiece  to  the  dexter,  with  the  letters  Rippon  arranged 
within  and  about  the  loops  of  the  string.  Burke  in  his  "  General  Armory " 
blazons  this  as  a  coat,  making  the  field  gules  and  the  bugle-horn  and  letters  or. 
The  Town-Clerk's  notepaper  shows  a  coat-of-arms,  "  Argent,  a  bugle-horn 
chained." 

RIPON,  See  of.     Argent,  on  a  saltire  gules,  two  keys  in  saltire,  wards  upwards  or,  on 
a  chief  of  the  second,  a  paschal  lamb  proper. 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  1S36.] 

RIPON,  Dean  of.     Argent  on  a  saltire  gules,  the  letter  D  of  the  field. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

RIPON  COLLEGE.     Paly  of  six  gules  and  argent,  on  a  chevron  azure,  three  cross 
crosslets.     Crest — A  paschal  lamb  passant. 
[Of  no  authority.] 


656 


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RIPON,  DEAN  OF 


RIPON,  SEE  OF 


RIPON  COLLEGE 


?T 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

RIVERINA,  See  of  (Australia).     Azure,  four  bars  wavy  argent,  over  all  a  Passion 
Cross  or,  on  a  canton  of  the  second  a  lymphad  sable. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

ROCHDALE  (Lancashire).  Argent,  a  vtrool-pack  encircled  by  two  branches  of  the 
cotton-tree  flowered  and  conjoined  proper,  a  bordure  sable,  charged  with  eight 
martlets  of  the  field.  Crest — Upon  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  mill-rind  sable, 
and  above  a  fleece  argent  banded  or.     Motto—"  Crede  Signo." 

Granted  by  Sir  Charles  George  Young,  Knt,  Garter  Principal  King  of 
Arms;  J.  Pulman,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms;  Robert  Laurie,  Norroy  King  of 
Arm.s,  20th  February  1857. 

ROCHESTER  (Kent).  Or,  on  a  cross  gules,  a  text  R  of  the  field,  on  a  chief  of 
the  second,  a  lion  of  England. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

ROCHESTER,  See  of.     Argent,  on  a  saltire  gules,  an  escallop  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 


658 


LJgiCie^oe'giano  Mi 


RIVERINA,   SEE  OF 


•\^^ 


ROCHDALE 


ROCHESTER 


ROCHESTER,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ROCKHAMPTON,  See  of  (Australia).    Gules,  a  sword  in  bend,  point  upwards,  and 
a  key  in  bend  sinister,  wards  upwards  in  saltire,  surmounted  by  a  crosier  in  pale. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

ROME  (Italy).     Gules,  a  cross  and  the  letters  S.P.O.R.  all  arranged  in  bend  or. 

ROMNEY  (Kent).     Azure,  three  lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  .'\rms.] 

ROMSEY  (Hants).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  represents  a  portcullis 
chained  within  the  legend,  "  Borough  of  Romsey,  1578." 

ROSCOMMON,  County.      Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

ROSEHEARTY.  Has  no  arms.  Those  upon  the  seal  are  :  Quarterly,  i  and  4, 
azure,  three  boars'  heads  couped  argent  ;  2  and  3,  gules,  three  cinquefoils  argent. 
Crest— On  a  baron's  cap  and  coronet,  a  rose-branch  and  a  heart.  Supporlcrs — 
Two  bears  proper,  muzzled  gules.     Motto — "  Cordo  et  manu." 

ROSMARKIE  (Ross-shire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  Refer 
to  Fortrose. 

ROSS  AND  CROMARTY,  Counties.     Have  no  armorial  bearings. 

ROSS.     See  New  Ross. 

ROSS,  See  of(Scotland).  Argent,  a  bishop  standing  on  the  sinister  habited  in  a 
long  robe  close  girt  purpure,  mitred  and  holding  in  his  left  hand  a  crosier  or, 
and  pointing  with  the  right  to  St  Bonifice  on  the  dexter  side,  clothed  and  both 
his  hands  laid  on  his  breast  proper. 

[These  arms  were  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register  in  1675  ^^^  ^^e  still  in  use, 
but  by  the  disestablishment  of  the  Epi.scopal  Church  in  Scotland  they  are 
really  e.xtinct  and  their  present  use  is  improper.] 

ROSS  (Scotland).     Refer  to  Moray,  Ross,  and  Caithness,  Bishop  of. 

ROSS  (Ireland).     Refer  to  Cork,  Cloyne,  and  Ross,  Bishop  of. 

ROSS,  EASTER.     Refer  to  Easter  Ross  Farmers'  Club. 


660 


ROCKHAMPTON,   SEE  OF 


ROME 


ROMNEY 


ROSS,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ROSSALL  SCHOOL  (Nr.  Blackpool,  Lanes).  Argent,  on  a  pale,  between  four 
roses  gules  a  mitre  or,  between  two  open  boo]<s  proper.  Motto — ■'  Mens  agitat 
molem." 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.     Gts.  Ixvii.  26] 

ROTHERHAM  (Yorkshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  but  a  device  appears 
to  be  made  use  of.  It  consists  of  a  bridge  supporting  two  escutcheons,  namely, 
on  the  dexter  side,  "Azure,  three  cannon  mounted  on  their  carriages  in 
pale  .  .  ."  and  on  the  sinister  side,  "Vert,  three  stags  trippant,  two  and 
one."     Motto — "  Sic  virescit  industria." 

ROTHES  (Elgin).  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  but  uses  those  of  Leslie,  viz.,  argent, 
on  a  bend  azure  three  buckles  or. 

ROTHESAY  (Buteshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  Those 
in  use  are  party  per  pale,  the  dexter  side  argent,  a  castle  triple-towered  between 
in  chief,  on  the  dexter  a  crescent  and  on  the  sinister  a  mullet,  and  in  base  a 
lymphad,  sail  furled,  the  sinister  side  being  the  arms  of  Stewart  or,  a  fesse 
chequy  azure  and  argent.  The  seal  represents  the  foregoing  arms,  within 
the  legend,  "  Libertas,  datur,  Villa;  de  Rothisea  per  Robertum  Stuart,  Rcgem 
Scottor." 

ROTTERDAM  (Holland).  Vert,  a  pale  argent,  on  a  chief  or  four  lions  passant 
two  and  two,  the  first  and  fourth  sable,  the  second  and  third  gules. 


662 


ROTHESAY 


ROSSALL  SCHOOL 


ROTHES 


ROTTERDAM 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ROUEN  (France).  Gules,  a  paschal  lamb  passant  proper,  on  a  chief  azure,  three 
fleurs-de-lis  or. 

ROUGE  CROIX  PURSUIVANT  OF  ARMS.     Badge— h  cross  gules. 

ROUGE  DRAGON  PURSUIVANT  OF  ARMS.     Badge— h  dragon  gules. 

ROUMANIA,  Kingdom  of.  Quarterly  i  azure,  an  eagle  displayed  holding  a  sceptre, 
sword  and  cross,  in  dexter  chief  a  sun  or  (VV.VLLACHIA).  2,  gules,  a  bull's  head 
caboshed,  between  its  horns  a  star,  and  in  sinister  chief  a  crescent  or  (MOLDAVIA). 
3.  Gules,  on  an  open  crown  a  lion  rampant  crowned  and  holding  between  its 
paws  a  star  or.  4.  Azure,  two  dolphins  affrontes,  heads  in  base,  tails  in  chief. 
Over  all  on  an  inescutcheon  the  arms  of  HOHENZOLLERN  :  viz.  Quarterly, 
argent  and  sable.  Supporters — Two  lions  cowarded  or.  Motto — "  Nihil 
sine  Deo." 

ROXBURGH,  County  of.  The  County  of  Roxburgh  bears  azure,  an  unicorn 
saliant  argent,  horned,  maned,  and  unguled  or,  the  tail  tufted  of  the  last  on 
a  chief  of  the  second,  a  hunting-horn  sable  stringed  and  viroled  gules,  between 
two  esquires'  helmets  of  the  field.  Crest — A  dexter  arm  from  the  shoulder 
vambraced  and  brandishing  a  scymitar  aloft  proper,  the  last  hilted  and 
pommelled  or.  Motto — (below  the  shield)  "  Ne  cede  malis  sed  contra  audentior 
ito." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Office,  9th  July  1798.] 

ROYAL  AFRICAN  COMPANY.     Refer  to  African  Company,  Royal. 

ROYAL  COLLEGES  OF  PHYSICIANS  AND  SURGEONS.  Refer  to 
Physicians,  Surgeons,  Veterinary  Surgeons. 

ROYAL  COMPANY  OF  ARCHERS.     Refer  to  Archers. 

ROYAL  CORPS  OF  GENTLEMEN-AT-ARMS.     Refer  to  Gentlemen-at-Arms. 


664 


ROUEN 


ROXBURGH 


I'J  ! 


ROUMANIA 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS  * 

ROYAL  EXCHANGE  ASSURANCE  COMPANY  OF  LONDON,  The 
Governor  and  Corporation  of  the.  (Incorporated  22nd  June  1720,  pursuant  to 
an  Act  of  Parliament,  6  Geo.  I.)  Azure,  on  a  hill,  the  Royal  Exchange,  both 
proper,  the  last  adorned  with  gold,  in  chief  two  ships,  the  dexter  under  sail,  the 
hull  or,  masts,  sails,  and  rigging  proper,  the  sinister  ship  riding  at  anchor,  with 
the  sails  furled,  emblazoned  as  before.  Cres^ — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a 
demi-angel  proper,  clothed  with  a  crimson  garment,  girdle  of  the  same,  wings 
displayed  or,  in  his  right  hand  the  sun,  in  his  left  a  crescent,  and  crowned  with 
a  ducal  coronet  the  North  Star  issuing  out  of  it  or.  Supporteis — (Dexter)  a 
Neptune  proper,  crowned  with  an  Eastern  crown  gold,  a  mantle  carelessly  flung 
over  his  body  purpure,  in  his  right  hand  a  trident  erect  or,  staff  proper  ;  (sinister) 
a  seaman  proper,  shirt  checquer'd,  vestment  blue,  lined  breeches  and  stockings 
white,  shoes  black,  buckled  silver,  cap  on  his  head  blue,  turned  up  white,  hold- 
ing with  his  left  hand  an  anchor  gold,  cable  proper.  Motto — "  Trade  and 
navigation." 

[College  of  Arms.     Gts.,  vii.  181.     Re-exemplified,  6th  April  1905.] 

ROYAL  FISHERY  COMPANY.     Refer  to  Fishery. 

ROYAL  HIGH  SCHOOL  (Edinburgh).     Refer  to  Edinburgh. 

ROYAL  HOSPITAL  OF  ST  KATHERINE.     Refer  to  St  Katherine. 

ROYAL  INSTITUTION  OF  GREAT  BRITAIN.  (Incorporated  20th  January 
1800.)  Azure,  the  sun  in  splendour  or,  in  base  the  ocean  proper,  on  a 
canton  argent  an  escutcheon  gules  charged  with  a  lion  passant  guardant  of  the 
second.  Crest — Out  of  a  mural  crown  or,  an  oak  fructed  proper.  Supporters — 
(Dexter)  a  figure  representing  Minerva  habited  in  a  robe  flowing  to  the  feet 
argent,  supervested  with  a  tunic  purpure,  zoned  or,  bearing  on  her  breast  a 
gorget  charged  with  Medusa's  head  of  the  last,  and  on  her  head  a  helmet  sur- 
mounted by  an  owl  gold,  the  plume  argent,  in  her  dexter  hand  a  spear  erect 
proper ;  (sinister)  a  figure  representing  Vesta  habited  in  a  flowing  robe  argent, 
banded  from  the  right  shoulder  under  the  left  breast,  the  band  or,  her  head  en- 
circled by  a  golden  fillet,  her  veil  thrown  back,  and  her  exterior  hand  holding  a 
torch  illumined  proper.     Motto — "  Illustrans  commoda  vitse." 

[Arms,  crest,  and  supporters  granted  by  Garter,  Clarenceux,  and    Norroy, 
31st  January  1800.] 

ROYAL  IRISH  ACADEMY.     See  Academy. 


666 


ROYAL  EXCHANGE  ASSURANCE  COMPANY  OF  LONDON 


ROYAL  INSTITUTION  OF  GREAT  BRITAIN 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ROYAL  LITERARY  FUND.  (Incorporated  13th  June  1818.)  Argent,  an  open 
book  between  three  chaplets  of  laurel  all  proper,  on  a  chief  gules  a  representation 
of  the  plume  of  three  ostrich  feathers  enfiled  by  his  coronet  as  borne  by  the  heir 
apparent  to  the  throne. 

[In  the  History  of  the  Fund  it  is  stated  (after  incorporation)  that "  The  Prince 
of  Wales  immediately  gave  the  Institution  permission  to  bear  his  crest  (sic)  upon 
its  arms,  and  expressed  his  high  sense  of  the  personal  compliment  paid  him 
in  requesting  it,"  and  it  is  further  stated  that  in  1842  "the  Queen  was  graciously 
pleased  to  grant  to  the  Institution  the  privilege  of  bearing  the  imperial  crown 
as  an  addition  to  its  armorial  bearings."     There  is  no  grant  of  arms  on  record.] 

ROYAL  NAVAL  SCHOOL,  Eltham.     Refer  to  Eltham  College. 

ROYAL  SOCIETY.  (Incorporated  1663.)  Argent  on  a  quarter  gules  three  lions 
passant  guardant  in  pale  or.  Crest — On  a  ducal  coronet  or,  an  eagle  with  wings 
endorsed  proper,  supporting  with  his  dexter  foot  an  escutcheon  gules  charged 
with  three  lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  or.  Supporters — Two  talbots  proper 
{i.e.  white  spotted  with  liver  colour)  ducally  gorged  or.  Motto — "  NuUius  in 
verba." 

[Granted  by  Sir  Edward  Walker,  Garter.] 

ROYAL  TECHNICAL  COLLEGE,  GLASGOW.  Azure,  a  saltire  argent,  in 
chief  an  imperial  crown  proper,  and  in  base  a  pair  of  scales  or.  Motto — 
"  Mente  et  manu." 

[Matriculated  Lyon  Office,  nth  July  1912.] 


668 


ROYAL  LITERARY  FUND 


ROYAL  TECHNICAL  COLLEGE,  GLASGOW 


ROYAL  SOCIETY 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

RUGBY  SCHOOL.  Azure,  on  a  fesse  engrailed  between  three  griffins'  liQads, 
erased  or,  a  fleur-de-lis  of  the  field  between  two  roses  gules.  Motto—''  Orando 
laborando." 

[Of  no  authority.] 

RUPERT'S  LAND,  See  of  (Canada).     Ermine,  a  cross  gules,  on  a  chief  azure,  a 
pastoral  staff  in  bend  surmounted  by  an  open  book  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

RUSSIA,  The  Empire  of.  The  arrhs  of  Russia  are  borne  on  the  breast  of  the  crowned 
imperial  double-headed  eagle  sable,  beak  and  claws  gules,  the  dexter  claw  holding 
the  imperial  sceptre,  the  sinister  the  orb.  The  central  shield  contains  the  shield 
known  as  the  arms  of  Moscow.  Gules,  the  mounted  effigy  of  St  George  slaying  the 
dragon  all  proper.  Around  it  hangs  the  collar  and  badge  of  the  Order  of  St  Andrew. 
On  the  dexter  wing  are  four  escocheons  :  i.  Kazan  :  Argent,  a  dragon  sable, 
winged  gules,  crowned  or  ;  2.  Poland  :  Gules,  an  eagle  displayed  argent,  crowned 
or  ;  3.  Tauria  :  Or,  a  double-headed  eagle  displayed  sable,  on  its  breast  a  shield  ; 
azure,  thereon  a  cross  triple-traversed,  within  a  bordure  or;  4.  Tierced  in  pairle, 
Kieve  (^.z'.),  Novgorod  (^.f.),  and  Vladimir.  On  the  sinister  wing  are:  i. 
Astrakan  :  Azure,  a  royal  crown  surmounting  a  scimitar  fesseways  proper  ;  2. 
Siberia  :  Ermine,  two  martins  (or  sables)  counter-rampant,  supporting  a  royal 
crown ;  behind  them  two  arrows  in  saltire,  and  a  bow  in  fesse  gules  ;  3. 
Quarterly  :  Kabarda,  Ineria,  Kartalinia,  and  Armenia  ;  ente  en  point  of  Circassia, 
over  all  Georgia,  or  else  Georgia  alone,  viz.,  or,  St  George  proper,  mounted  on  a 
horse  sable,  slaying  a  dragon  of  the  third  winged  vert.  4.  Finland  ;  Gules  seme 
of  roses  argent,  over  all  a  lion  rampant  crowned  or,  brandishing  a  sword  and 
holding  in  its  sinister  paw  the  scabbard  proper. 

The  imperial  crown  is  placed  above  the  crowned  heads  of  the  double  eagle. 

RUSSIA  MERCHANTS'  COMPANY.  (Incorporated  1555.)  Barry  wavy  of 
six  argent  and  azure,  over  all  a  ship  of  three  masts  in  full  sail  proper,  sails, 
pennants,  and  ensigns  of  the  first,  each  charged  with  a  cross  gules  all  between 
three  bezants,  a  chief  or,  on  a  pale  between  two  roses  gules  seeded  or,  barbed 
vert,  a  lion  passant  guardant  of  the  fifth.  Crest— h  lizard's  head  guardant  and 
erased  proper,  ducally  gorged  or.  Siipporters—{Ji&ii.te:x)  a  lizard  rampant  guardant 
proper  ducally  gorged  or  ;  (sinister)  an  apre  (an  heraldic  figure  drawn  like  an  ox 
— the  tail  short)  rampant  guardant  proper  ducally  gorged  or.  Motto — "  God  be 
our  guide." 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  ist  February  1555.] 

The  lizards  in  this  achievement  are  not  the  animal  bearing  the  name  which 
we  know  at  the  present  day,  but  a  (real  or  mythical)  creature  also  known  as  the 
short-tailed  wild  cat  of  Norway — refer  to  the  arms  of  the  Skinners'  Company. 


670 


RUGBY  SCHOOL 


RUPERT'S  LAND,  SEE  OF 


RUSSIA 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

RUTHERGLEN  (Lanarkshire).  Argent,  in  a  sea  proper  an  ancient  galley 
sable,  flagged  gules,  therein  two  men  proper,  one  rowing,  the  other  furling 
the  sail.  Above  the  shield  is  placed  a  suitable  helmet,  with  a  mantling  gules 
doubled  argent,  and  on  a  wreath  of  the  proper  liveries  is  set  for  Crest— 
A  demi-figure  of  the  Virgin  Mary  with  the  Infant  Saviour  in  her  arms  proper, 
and  on  a  compartment  below  the  shield,  on  which  is  an  escroll  containing 
this  Motto — "  Ex  fumo  fama,"  are  placed  for  Supporters — Two  angels  proper 
winged  or. 

[Arms  matriculated  in  Lyon  Office,  and  the  supporters  granted  4th  April 
1889.     Wm.  Mitchell,  Esquire,  Provost] 

RUTHIN  (Denbighshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal,  which  is 
quadrilateral,  represents  a  triangular  castle  slightly  in  perspective,  with  the 
legend,  "  Mayor,  Aldermen,  and  Burgesses  of  Ruthin." 

RUTLAND,  County  of.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Berry,  in  his  "  Dictionary 
of  Heraldry,"  quotes,  "  Gules,  a  fret  or,"  and  a  lithographed  sheet,  published 
under  the  title  of  "  The  Arms  of  the  Counties  of  England  and  Wales,"  gives, 
"  Or,  a  horse-shoe  sable,  nailed  argent."  Both,  of  course,  are  without  authority, 
the  latter  being  the  "  reputed  "  arms  of  the  town  of  Oakham.  The  seal  of 
the  County  Council  exhibits  upon  an  architectural  background  a  horse-shoe. 

RYDE  (Isle  of  Wight).  Argent,  in  base  on  waves  of  the  sea  a  schooner  yacht 
under  sail  proper,  within  a  bordure  azure,  charged  with  eight  estoiles  or.  Crest — 
Upon  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  upon  a  rock  a  sea-horse  proper,  charged  on 
the  body  with  two  estoiles  or.     Motto — "  Amoenitas  salubritas  urbanitas." 

[Granted  by  Sir  Charles  George  Young,  Knt.,  Garter  Principal  King  of 
Arms ;  Robert  Laurie,  Clarenceu.x  King  of  Arms ;  Walter  Aston  Blount, 
Norroy  King  of  Arms,  iSth  February  1869.] 

RYE  (Sussex).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  used  are  party  per  pale  gules 
and  azure,  three  demi-lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  or,  conjoined  to  the  hulks 
of  as  many  ships  argent.     [Refers  to  Cinque  Ports.] 


672 


RUTHERGLEN 


RYE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
SABAH,  Governor  of.     Refer  to  British  North  Borneo  Company. 

SADDLERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  1272.)  Azure, 
a  chevron  between  three  manage  saddles  complete  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the 
colours,  a  horse  passant  argent,  crined,  bridled,  saddled  and  trappings  or,  on  his 
head  a  plume  of  three  feathers  argent.  Supporters — Two  horses  argent,  maned, 
hoofed,  and  bridled  or,  on  each  head  a  plume  of  three  feathers  argent.  Motto — 
"  Our  trust  is  in  God."     (Ancient  Motto,  "  Hold  fast,  sit  sure.") 

[Supporters  and  crest  granted  to  the  arms  of  the  Company,  20th  October 
1585.] 

SADDLERS  (Gateshead).      Azure,  a  chevron  between  three  manage  saddles  com- 
plete or.     Crest — A  horse  passant,  and  on  his  head  a  plume  of  three  feathers 
argent.     Supporters — Two  horses  argent,  hoofed  and  bridled  or. 
[Of  no  authority.    Taken  from  the  Gateshead  Charter,  1671.] 

SAFFRON  WALDEN  (Essex).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  It  represents  a 
castle  in  base,  and  in  fesse  two  towers  all  joined  with  a  circular  wall  embattled, 
and  in  the  centre  of  the  seal  three  saffron  flowers  slipped  and  leaved,  with  the 
legend,  "  Sigillum  Comunis  Villae  de  Walden  in  Comitatu  Essex." 

ST.  ALBANS  (Hertfordshire).     Azure,  a  saltire  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

ST.  ALBANS,   See  of     Azure,  a  saltire  or,  over  all  a  sword  in  pale  point  upwards 
proper,  pomel  and  hilt  and  surmounted  by  a  celestial  crown  of  the  second. 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  1877.] 


674 


SADDLERS,  COMPANY  OF  (LONDON) 


ST.  ALBANS 


ST.  ALBANS,  SEE  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ST.  ANDREWS,   Archiepiscopal  See  of  (Scotland).     Azure,  a   saltire  argent. 

[These  arms  were  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  c.  1672-7,  and  are  still  in 
use,  but  by  the  disestablishment  of  the  Episcopal  Church  in  Scotland  they  are 
really  extinct  and  their  present  use  is  improper.] 

There  is  a  note  in  Lyon  Register  to  the  above  matriculation. 

"  Albeit  for  the  scale  of  the  See  he  constantly  gives  in  a  field  azure,  the 
Image  of  St  Andrew  the  Patron  of  Scotland,  vested  and  placed  within  the  porch 
of  a  church  proper,  having  his  cross  of  martyrdome  on  his  breast  argent,  with 
these  words  in  flying  escrolls  on  each  side  '  Regi  Ecclesia  Sacris,'  on  the  right 
and  'Auspice  summo  numine'  on  the  left  and  round  the  Seal  '  Sigillum 
rotundum  Archiepiscopi  Sancti  Andreae.'" 

ST.  ANDREWS,  DUNKELD,  AND  DUNBLANE,  Bishop  of.  According  to 
Crockford  the  device  in  use  is  per  pale  (dexter)  azure,  a  saltire  argent,  (sinister) 
per  fesse  in  chief  argent,  a  saltire  engrailed  azure  in  base  argent,  a  passion  cross 
sable  between  two  passion  nails  gules. 

Woodward,  however,  makes  four  quarters  repeating  St  Andrews.  Both 
arrangements  are  of  course  quite  unauthorised. 

ST.  ANDREWS,  City  of  (Fifeshire.)  Parted  per  pale  azure  and  argent,  in  the 
dexter  on  a  mount  in  base  the  figure  of  St  Andrew  proper,  bearing  his  cross  in 
front  of  him  argent,  in  the  sinister  growing  out  of  a  mount  in  base  an  oak-tree 
proper  fructed  or,  in  front  of  the  trunk  a  boar  passant  sable,  langued  gules 
armed  or.  Above  the  shield  is  placed  a  mural  crown,  and  on  an  escrol  below 
the  shield  this  motto,  "  Dum  spiro  spero." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  29th  May  191 2.] 

ST.  ANDREWS,  University  of.     See  University  of  St  Andrews. 

ST.  ASAPH  (Cornwall).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  following  are  quoted  in 
Burke's  "  General  Armory  " : — "  Sa.  two  keys  in  saltire  endorsed  ar."  (These 
are,  of  course,  the  arms  of  the  see  of  St  Asaph.) 

ST.  ASAPH,  See  of  (Wales).     Sable,  two  keys  in  saltire  endorsed  argent. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 


676 


ST.  ANDREWS,  CITY  OF 


ST.  ANDREWS,  ARCHIEPISCOPAL  SEE  OF 


ST.  ASAPH 


ST.  ASAPH,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ST.  BARTHOLOMEW'S  HOSPITAL.  Per  pale  argent  and  sable,  a  chevron 
counterchanged. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

ST.  CATHERINE'S  COLLEGE,  Cambridge.  (Founded  in  1475,  by  Robert 
Woodlarke,  Provost  of  King's  College  and  Chancellor  of  the  University.) 
According  to  University  Calendar,  Per  bend  indented  azure,  and  gules,  in  dexter 
chief  a  fleur-de-lis  and  in  sinister  base  a  lion  passant  guardant,  all  or.  Crest — 
A  Catharine  wheel. 

ST.  CATHERINE'S  HOSPITAL  (London).     Refer  to  St  Katharine's  Hospital. 

ST.  CROSS  HOSPITAL  (Winchester).  Argent,  five  crosses  pattee  fitchee  sable, 
two,  two,  and  one. 

ST.  CHRISTOPHER.     Refer  to  Leeward  Islands. 

ST.  DAVIDS,  (Pembrokeshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  following  are 
quoted  in  Burke's  "  General  Armory": — "  Sa.  on  a  cross  or,  five  cinquefoils  of 
the  first."     (These  are,  of  course,  the  arms  of  the  see  of  St  Davids.) 

ST.  DAVID'S,  See  of  (Wales).     Sable,  on  a  cross  or,  five  cinquefoils  of  the  field. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

ST.  DAVID'S,  Dean  of.     The  arms  of  the  See,  but  with  the  tinctures  reversed. 

[Of  no  authority.] 


678 


ST.  BARTHOLOMEW'S  HOSPITAL 


ST.  CATHERINE'S  COLLEGE 


ST.  CROSS  HOSPITAL 


ST.  DAVID'S,  SEE  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF   PUBLIC  ARMS 

ST.  DAVID'S,  College  of.  Sable,  between  four  cinquefoils  in  cross  or,  a  figure 
representing  St  David  standing  in  his  archiepiscopal  robes  in  a  niche  under  a 
canopy,  holding  in  his  dexter  hand  a  crosier  and  in  his  sinister  a  book,  all  gold. 
Motto^-"  Gair  duw  gorew  dysg." 

[College  of  Arms.    Gts.  xxxviii.  70.] 

ST.  EDMUND'S  HALL  (Oxford).     Has  no  arms.    Those  in  use  according  to  the 
Calendar  are,  Or,  a  cross  flory  gules,  between  four  martlets  sable. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

ST.  EDMUNDSBURY  (St  Edmund's).     Refer  to  Bury  St  Edmunds. 

ST.  ETIENNE  (France).  Azure,  two  palm-branches  in  saltire  or,  between  a  crown 
in  chief  of  the  last  and  three  crosses  couped  argent  in  fesse  and  in  base. 

ST.  GALLEN  (Switzerland).     Vert,  a  fasces  erect  argent,  banded  of  the  field. 

ST.  GEORGE'S  CHAPEL  (Windsor).     Refer  to  Windsor. 


680 


ST.  DAVID'S,  COLLEGE  OF 


ST.  EDMUND'S  HALL  (OXFORD) 


BLIC    1 


ST.  ETIENNE 


ST.  GALLEN 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ST.  GEORGE'S  HOSPITAL  (London).  Or,  the  staff  of  ^sculapius  in  pale  proper, 
surmounted  by  a  celestial  crown  azure.  Cresi— On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  lion 
rampant  or,  resting  the  forepaws  on  an  antique  shield  charged  with  the  figure 
of  St  George  slaying  the  dragon  proper.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  figure  repre- 
senting /Esculapius  proper,  habited  in  a  robe  purpure,  supporting  with  his  left 
hand  his  staff,  also  proper  ;  (sinister)  a  figure  representing  Hygeia,  vested  argent, 
robe  purpure,  holding  in  the  exterior  hand  the  patera  and  serpent  proper.  Motto 
— "  Deus  incubat  angui." 

[College  of  Arms.     Gts.  xl.  327.] 

ST.  GERMANS,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

ST.  GERMANS  (Cornwall).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

ST.  HELENA.  No  warrant  assigning  arms  has  as  yet  been  issued  to  St  Helena. 
The  Admiralty  publish  as  the  device  to  be  used  upon  the  Union  flag  by  the 
Governor  the  arms,  "  In  a  landscape  field  upon  waves  of  the  sea  in  base  a  three- 
masted  ship  with  sails  furled,  rocks  issuing  from  the  sea  and  the  dexter  side  of 
the  escutcheon." 

ST.  HELENA,  See  of.     .•\zure,  in  base  on  waves  of  the  sea  wherein  are  fishes,  an 
ancient  galley  of  three  masts,  sails  furled  all  proper,  in  chief  a  crescent  and  a 
star  of  eight  points  argent. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

ST.  HELENS  (Lancashire).  Argent,  two  bars  azure,  over  all  a  cross  sable,  in  the 
first  and  fourth  quarters  a  saltire  gules,  and  in  the  second  and  third  a  gryphon 
segreant  of  the  third.  And  for  the  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours  a  lion 
passant  guardant  proper,  charged  on  the  body  with  two  fleurs-de-lis  gules, 
resting  the  dexter  fore-paw  on  an  ingot  of  silver.  Motto — "  Ex  terra  lucem." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  17th  January  1876.] 

ST.  HELIERS  (Jersey).     Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

ST.  IVES  (Cornwall).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  following  are  quoted  in 
Burke's  "  General  Armory "  : — "  Ar.  an  ivy  branch  overspreading  the  whole 
field  vert." 

ST.  IVES  (Huntingdonshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Those  used  are  peculiar, 
and  show  a  lamentable  ignorance  of  heraldry  on  somebody's  part.  They  are, 
Quarterly  .  .  .  and  .  .  .  four  bulls'  heads.  Motto — "  Sudore  non  sopore." 
Though  the  partition  lines  are  very  plainly  en  evidence,  all  four  quarters  are 
marked  gules.  The  bulls'  heads  are  far  from  heraldic,  being  neither  couped, 
erased,  nor  cabossed,  but  savouring  of  all  three.  They  have  a  remarkable 
resemblance  to  Messrs  Colman's  trade-mark.  Had  the  original  artist  no  better 
copy  to  guide  him  than  an  old  mustard  tin  ? 

682 


ST.  GEORGE'S  HOSPITAL 


ST.  HELENA,  SEE  OF 


^:\JCEN 

ST.  HELENS  (LANCASHIRE) 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
ST.  JAMES,  Guild  of.     Refer  to  Cook's  Company,  Dublin. 

ST.  JOHN  BAPTIST  COLLEGE  (Oxford).  (Founded  in  1557  by  Sir  Thomas 
White,  Knt.,  y\lderman  of  London,  and  member  of  the  Merchant  Tailors' 
Company,  the  patron  of  which  was  deemed  to  be  St  John  the  Baptist).  Gules, 
on  a  bordure  sable,  eight  estoiles  or,  on  a  canton  ermine,  a  lion  rampant  of  the 
second,  an  annulet  of  the  third  for  difference  in  the  centre.  Crest — A  stork 
proper. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

ST.  JOHN'S  COLLEGE  (Cambridge).  (Founded  in  1508  by  Margaret,  Countess 
of  Richmond,  who  also  founded  Christ  College,  daughter  and  heir  of  John 
Beaufort,  Duke  of  Somerset,  wife  of  Edmond  Tudor,  Earl  of  Richmond,  and 
mother  of  Henry  VU.)  Quarterly,  France  and  England,  within  a  border 
gobony  argent  and  azure. 

[Recorded  in  College  of  Arms.] 

ST.  JOHN  OF  JERUSALEM  HOSPITAL  (London).  Argent,  a  cross  potent 
between  four  crosses  or. 

ST.  JOHN'S,  KAFFRARIA,  See  of.  Azure,  the  figure  of  St  John  the  Evangelist 
proper. 

[Of  no  authority.] 


684 


ST.  JOHN  BAPTIST  COLLEGE  (OXFORD) 


ST.  JOHN'S  COLLEGE  (CAMBRIDGE) 


ST.  JOHN'S,  KAFFRARIA,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ST.  KATHARINE,  The  Royal  Hospital  of,  Regent's  Park.  Per  fesse  gules  and 
azure,  in  chief  a  sword  fessewise  argent,  hilt  and  pomel  or,  in  base  a  demi- 
Catharine  wheel  of  the  last  divided  fessewise,  the  circular  part  towards  the 
chief. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

ST.  KITTS,  otherwise  ST.  CHRISTOPHER.     Refer  to  Leeward  Islands. 

ST.  LUCIA.  No  warrant  assigning  arms  has  as  yet  been  issued,  but  the  Admiralty 
publishes  as  a  device  for  use  on  the  Union  flag  by  the  Governor,  a  landscape 
representation  of  an  island  in  the  sea,  with  the  motto,  "  Statio  hand  malefida 
carinis." 

ST.  MARY  HALL  (Oxford).     Has  no  arms. 

ST.  MARYLEBONE.     Refer  to  Marylebone. 

ST.  MARY'S  COLLEGIATE  CHURCH,  Port  Elizabeth  (S.  Africa).    Azure,  the 
Virgin  Mary  and  the  Holy  Infant  all  proper,  on  a  canton  argent  an  anchor  erect 
cabled,  also  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

ST.  MAWES  (Cornwall).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  following  are  given  in 
Burke's  "General  Armory": — "  Az.  a  bend  lozengy  or,  betw.  a  tower  in  the 
sinister  chief  ar.,  and  a  ship  with  three  masts,  the  sail  furled,  in  the  dexter  base 
of  the  second." 

ST.  PANCRAS,  Borough  of  (London).     Has  no  arms. 

ST.  PAUL'S  SCHOOL,  KENSINGTON  (London).  Sable,  on  a  chevron  between 
three  hinds  trippant  argent,  as  many  annulets  of  the  field.  Motto — "  Fide  et 
Uteris." 

[Of  no  authority.] 


686 


ST.  KATHARINE,  ROYAL  HOSPITAL  OF 


ST.  MARY'S  COLLEGIATE  CHURCH 


ST.  MAWES 


ST.  PAUL'S  SCHOOL,  KENSINGTON 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

ST.  PETERSBURG  or  PETROGRAD  (Russia).  Gules,  an  anchor  in  bend 
and  a  grappling-iron  in  bend  sinister  argent,  flukes  upwards,  surmounted  by  a 
sceptre  in  pale  or. 

ST.  PETER'S  COLLEGE  (Radley).     Refer  to  Radley  College. 

ST.  SAVIOUR'S  COLLEGIATE  CHURCH  (Southwark).     Refer  to  Southwark. 

ST.  THOMAS  OF  ACONS'  HOSPITAL  ( London).  Azure,  a  cross  pattde  per  pale 
gules  and  argent. 

ST.   THOMAS'S    HOSPITAL  (London).     Argent,   a    cross   gules,   in    the    first 
quarter  a  sword  erect  of  the  last,  on  a  chief  of  the  same,  a  rose  argent  between 
two  fleurs-de-lis  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

ST.  VINCENT.  Argent,  in  base  a  field  of  grass  vert,  thereon  on  an  ancient  altar 
charged  with  two  clasped  hands  or,  fire,  between  two  female  figures  proper, 
vested  azure,  the  de.xter  figure  erect  holding  in  the  right  hand  a  branch  of  olive 
slipped,  the  sinister  figure  kneeling  on  the  right  knee  and  offering  sacrifices  all 
proper.  Crest — A  sprig  of  the  cotton-plant  leaved  and  slipped  proper.  Motto — 
"  Pax  et  justitia." 

[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  29th  November  19 12.] 


688 


ST.  PETERSBURG 


\ -;  JgaxetjuBtitia 

ST.  VINCENT,  COLONY  OF 


ojo 


ST.  THOMAS'S  HOSPITAL 


2X 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SALFORD  (Lancashire).  Azure,  semee  of  bees  volant,  a  shuttle  between  three 
garbs  or,  on  a  chief  of  the  last,  a  bale  corded  proper,  between  two  mill-rinds 
sable.  Crest — A  demi-lion  argent,  supporting  a  lance  proper,  therefrom  flowing 
to  the  sinister  a  flag  azure,  charged  with  a  shuttle  or.  Supporters — On  the 
dexter  side  a  wolf  or,  around  the  neck  a  chain,  and  pendent  therefrom  an 
escocheon  gules,  charged  with  a  mill-rind,  also  or ;  on  the  sinister  side  an 
heraldic  antelope  argent,  armed,  crined,  and  unguled  or,  around  the  neck  a 
chain,  and  pendent  therefrom  an  escocheon  gules,  charged  with  a  rose,  also 
argent.     Motto — "  Integrity  and  industry." 

[Arms  and  crest  granted  by  Sir  Charles  George  Young,  Knt.,  Garter  Principal 
King  of  Arms  ;  J.  Hawkes,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms  ;  Francis  Martin,  Norroy 
King  of  Arms,  sth  November  1844.  Supporters  granted  by  Sir  Charles  George 
Young,  Knt.,  Garter  Principal  King  of  Arms,  6th  November  1844.] 

SALISBURY  (Wiltshire).  Barry  of  eight  azure  and  or  Supporters — On  either 
side  an  eagle  displayed  with  two  heads  or,  ducally  gorged  azure. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

Gwillim  gives  (and  Burke  follows  him,  quoting  in  addition),  "  Azure,  a 
sword  argent,  hilt  and  pommel  or,  surmounted  by  a  key  of  the  last,  on  a  chief 
argent,  three  lozenges  gules." 


690 


SALFORD 


SALISBURY 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SALISBURY,  See  of.  Azure,  our  Lady  crowned,  holding  on  her  dexter  arm  tlie 
Infant  Jesus  and  in  her  sinister  hand  a  sceptre  all  or,  round  both  the  heads 
circles  of  glory  of  the  last. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

SALISBURY,  Dean  of.     The  arms  of  the  See,  the  letter  D  in  chief. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

SALOP.     See  Shropshire  and  Shrewsbury. 

SALTASH  (Cornwall).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Two  seals  are  recorded  in  the 
visitation  books — i.  A  three-masted  ship  with  sails  furled  at  anchor,  with  the 
legend,  "  Sigillum  aquate  Saltasche."  2.  An  escutcheon  charged  with  a  lion 
rampant  within  a  bordure  bezantee  resting  upon  water,  surmounted  by  a 
coronet  composed  of  crosses  patee  and  fleurs-de-lis,  and  on  either  side  an 
ostrich  feather  labelled  with  the  legend  "  Sigillum  Saltashe."  Burke  in  his 
"Armory"  gives  two  entries,  one  quoting  the  seals,  and  in  the  other  blazoning 
the  latter  seal  as  a  coat-of-arms  as  follows  : — "  Saltash,  Town  of  (co.  Cornwall). — 
Az.  the  base  water  ppr.  in  pale  an  escutcheon  or,  thereon  a  lion  ramp.  gu.  within 
a  border  sa.  bezantee,  ensigned  with  a  prince's  coronet  of  the  third,  on  either 
side  of  the  escutcheon  an  ostrich  feather  an"     Berry  also  gives  it. 

SALTCOATS  (Ayrshire).  Has  no  arms,  those  in  use  being :  Quarterly,  i  argent, 
a  lymphad  sail  furled  and  oars  in  action  ;  2  argent,  a  ruined  building  indicative 
of  the  old  saltpans ;  3  azure,  a  fish  naiant ;  4  gules,  three  gem-rings  or,  stoned 
azure.     Motto — "  Per  mare  per  terras." 

SALTERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  1559.)  Per 
chevron  azure  and  gules,  three  covered  salts  argent,  garnished  or.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  a  cubit  arm  erect,  issuing  from  clouds  all  proper,  holding  a 
covered  salt  argent,  garnished  or.  Supporters — Two  otters  sable,  bezanty,  ducally 
gorged  and  chained  or.     Motto — "  Sal  sapit  omnia." 

[Arms  granted  by  Thomas  Benolt,  Clarenceux,  1530,  and  crest  and  sup- 
porters by  Robert  Cooke,  Clarenceux,  1591  ;  confirmed  at  the  visitation  of  the 
City  of  London,  1634.] 

SALT  FISHMONGERS'  COMPANY.     Refer  to  Fishmongers' Company. 


692 


SALISBURY,  DEAN  OF 


SALISBURY,  SEE  OF 


SALTER  S,  COMPANY  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SALZBURG.     Refer  to  Austria. 

SALZBURG  (Austria).      Gules,  a  quadrilateral  castle  in  perspective  proper. 

SALZBURG,  Duchy  of.  Party  per  pale  dexter  or,  a  lion  rampant  sable,  sinister 
gules,  a  fesse  argent. 

SAMOS.  Per  fesse,  the  chief  gules,  a  lion's  face  or,  the  base  per  pale  dexter 
argent  on  a  mount  in  base  vert,  an  ox  couchant  to  the  sinister  issuing  from  the 
dexter  side  of  the  escutcheon  :  sinister,  azure,  on  a  mount  in  base  vert,  a  crosier  in 
bend  argent  surmounted  by  a  peacock  to  the  sinister  close  proper. 

SANDWICH  (Kent).     Party  per  pale  gules  and  azure,  three  demi-lions  passant 
guardant  or,  conjoined  to  the  hulks  of  as  many  ships  argent. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

SANQUHAR  (Dumfriesshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings. 
The  seal  represents  an  embattled  gateway  approached  by  five  steps,  flanked  on 
either  side  by  a  tower  with  cupola  and  fane,  and  above  the  battlements  of  the 
gateway  rise  three  towers  each  with  a  like  cupola  and  fane,  the  centre  tower 
rising  above  the  outer  ones.  The  legend  is  "  Sigillum  commune  Burgi  de 
Sanquhar." 


694 


SANDWICH 


SALZBURG 


SALZBURG,  DUCHY  OF 


SAMOS 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SAN  MARINO,  Republic  of.  Azure,  on  three  rocks  issuing  in  base  as  many 
towers  all  proper,  and  from  the  battlements  of  each  tower  an  ostrich  feather 
erect  argent. 

SARAGOSSA  (Spain).     Azure,  a  lion  rampant  argent,  crowned  or. 

SARATOFF  (Russia).  Azure,  three  sturgeon  issuing  from  the  points  of  the 
escutcheon,  their  heads  to  the  centre  fesse  point  all  proper. 

SARAWAK.     This  territory  is  only  under  British  Protection. 

The  arms  made  use  of  were  those  granted  to  Rajah  Sir  James  Brooke, 
K.CB.  He  died  without  issue  and  was  succeeded  as  Rajah  by  his  nephew, 
H.H.  Rajah  Sir  Charles  Johnson  Brooke,  G.C.M.G.  (originally  Johnson),  who 
adopted  the  name  of  Brooke  and  the  arms  of  his  uncle.  These  arms  are  :  "  Or, 
a  cross  engrailed  per  cross  indented  azure  and  sable,  in  the  first  quarter  an  estoile 
of  the  second.  Crest— On  an  Eastern  crown  a  brock  proper  ducally  gorged  or. 
Motto—"  Dum  spiro  spero."  The  Rajah  flies  a  yellow  forked  flag,  charged  with 
a  cross  per  pale  sable  and  gules  charged  with  a  crown  and  with  the  red  lateral 
arm  of  the  cross  extended  saltirewise  to  each  point  of  the  fork. 

SARAWAK.  See  Singapore,  Labuan,  and  Sarawak,  See  of,  and  see  Labuan  and 
Sarawak,  See  of. 

SARK.     Refer  to  Channel  Islands. 

SASKATCHEWAN,  Province  of  (Dominion  of  Canada).    Vert,  three  garbs  in  fesse 
or,  on  a  chief  of  the  last  a  lion  passant  guardant  gules. 
[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  2Sth  August  1906.] 


696 


SAN  MARINO 


SARAGOSSA 


SASKATCHEWAN,  PROVINCE  OF 


SARATOFF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SASKATCHEWAN,  See  of  (Canada).  Vert,  on  a  fesse  wavy  argent,  between 
in  chief  a  i<ey  and  a  pastoral  staff  in  saltire  and  in  base  a  garb,  an  Indian  in  a 
canoe  all  proper. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

SAVOY,  THE  MASTER  OF  THE  (Hospital  of  King  Henry  VH.,  Savoy). 
Argent,  on  a  cross  gules,  an  ostrich  feather  enfiled  with  a  scroll  argent,  between 
in  chief  a  sword  erect  and  in  base  a  mill-rind  surmounted  by  a  fleur-de-lis,  and 
a  castle  and  a  lion  passant  guardant  in  fesse  all  or,  on  a  chief  paly  of  four  azure 
and  gules,  a  paschal  Iamb  between  two  bezants,  each  charged  with  a  rose  gules 
and  ensigned  with  the  Imperial  crown  proper. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

As  usually  displayed  these  arms  are  supported  (pendent  by  a  guige  from 
the  beak)  on  the  breast  of  an  eagle  displayed  sable,  quilled,  beaked  and  crowned 
with  an  imperial  crown  or,  but  there  is  no  authority  for  such  usage. 

SAXE-ALTENBURG,  Duchy  of  Quarterly:  i  Altenburg,  argent,  a  rose  gules, 
2  Eisenberg,  argent,  three  bars  azure,  3  Orlamunde,  or,  seme  of  hearts  gules, 
a  lion  rampant  sable  crowned  of  the  second,  4  Pleissen,  azure,  a  lion  rampant 
per  fesse  or  and  argent,  over  all  a  crowned  inescutcheon  of  Saxony.  Crests — 
I.  Saxony,  2.  Thuringia,  3.  Weissen.  Supporters — Two  crowned  lions  guardant 
or,  each  supporting  a  banner  per  fesse  argent  and  vert. 
[Refer  to  Saxony,  Kingdom  of] 


698 


SAVOY,  MASTER  OF  THE 


SASKATCHEWAN,  SEE  OF 


SAXE-ALTENBURG 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SAXE-COBURG  AND  GOTHA,  Duchy  of.  Quarterly:  i  or,  a  lion  rampant 
sable  (Julich),  2  gules,  an  escarbuncle  or,  the  centre  an  inescutcheon  argent 
(Cleves),  3  argent,  a  lion  rampant  gules,  crowned  azure  (Berg)  4  gules,  three 
hearts  or  (?  seeblatter)  (Engern),  5  gules,  a  horse  saliant  argent  (Westphalia), 
6  sable,  a  lion  rampant  or  (Coburg),  7  azure,  a  lion  rampant  barry  of  eight 
argent  and  gules,  crowned  or  (Gotha),  8  or,  a  lion  rampant  sable  (Meissen), 
9  Henneberg  and  Romhild  (refer  to  Saxe-Meiningen)  impaled,  10  per  fesse 
argent  and  azure,  seme  of  —  a  lion  rampant,  all  counterchanged,  crowned  or 
(Lichtenburg),  11  azure,  an  eagle  displayed  or  (Saxony),  12  sable,  an  eagle 
displayed  or  (Thuringia),  13  or,  two  pallets  azure  (Landsberg),  14  argent,  three 
seeblatter  gules  (Brena),  15  or,  seme  of  hearts  gules,  a  lion  rampant  sable 
crowned  of  the  second  (Orlamunde),  16  azure,  a  lion  rampant  per  fesse  or 
and  argent  (Pleissen),  17  argent,  a  rose  gules  (Altenburg),  18  argent,  three 
barrulets  azure  (Eisenberg),  19  or,  a  fess  chequy  gules  and  argent  (Mark), 
20  argent,  three  chevronels  gules  (Ravensberg),  21  or,  a  bend  argent,  surmounted 
by  a  raven  holding  in  its  beak  a  gold  ring  (Ravenstein),  22  azure,  a  lion  rampant 
argent  (Tonna),  23  gules  ;  over  all  an  escutcheon  of  Saxony.  Crests — i.  Saxony 
2.  Meissen,  3.  Thuringia,  4.  a  griffin's  head  or,  collared  gules,  winged  sable 
5.  a  bull's  head  gules,  ringed  and  horned  argent,  crowned  or,  the  rim  chequy  gules 
and  argent,  6.  out  of  a  crown  a  plume  of  peacock  feathers.  Supporters — Two 
lions  guardant  and  crowned  or.     Motto — "  Fideliter  et  constanter." 

The   present    and   late    dukes    bore    on    an    escutcheon    of    Saxony    an 
inescutcheon  of  the  arms  of  the  United  Kingdom  with  their  especial  labels. 

SAXE  -  MEININGEN  -  HILDBURGHAUSEN,       Duchy       of         Quarterly: 
I  Thuringia,  2   Henneberg,    3    Romhild,    gules,  a   Corinthian    column    argent, 
crowned  or,  4  Meissen  ;  over  all  a  crowned  inescutcheon  of  Saxony,  or  else  the 
quarterings  as  in  the  illustration  of  the  full  coat  of  arms. 
[Refer  to  the  Kingdom  of  Saxony.] 


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SAXEtMEININGEN-HILDBURGHAUSEN 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SAXE-WEIMAR  EISENACH,  Grand  Duchy  of.  Quarterly:  i  Thuringia 
(azure,  a  lion  rampant  double  queued  barry  of  eight  gules  and  argent),  2  Meissen, 
3  per  pale  on  the  dexter  Henneberg ;  sinister,  per  pale  argent  and  gules,  a  bend 
enhanced  and  counterchanged  (Neustadt  Arnshaugk),  4  per  pale  (dexter)  a  lion 
rampant  sable  debruised  by  a  bend  or  (Blankenhain),  (sinister)  bendy  of  eight 
azure  and  argent  (Tautenberg);  all  over  a  crowned  inescutcheon  of  Saxony. 
Crests — I.  Saxony,  2.  Thuringia,  3.  Meissen.  Motto — "  Vigilando  ascendimus." 
[Refer  to  Kingdom  of  Saxony  for  descriptions.] 


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THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SAXONY,  Kingdom  of.  Quarterly :  i  or,  a  lion  rampant  sable  (Meissen),  2  azure, 
a  lion  rampant  barry  of  eight  argent  and  gules,  crowned  or  (Thuringia),  3  sable, 
an  eagle  displayed  or  (Thuringia),  4  azure,  an  eagle  displayed  and  crowned  or 
(Saxony),  5  gules,  6  azure,  a  lion  rampant  per  fesse  or  and  argent  (Pleissen), 
7  sable,  a  lion  rampant  crowned  or  (Voightlond),  8  gules,  9  or,  seme  of  hearts 
gules,  a  lion  rampant  sable,  crowned  also  gules  (Orlamunde),  10  or,  two  pallets 
azure  (Landsberg),  n  per  fesse  and  the  base  per  pale,  (a)  per  fesse  embattled 
azure  and  or,  masoned  sable  (Oberlausitz),  (1^)  argent,  a  rose  gules  (Altenburg), 
(c)  or,  on  a  mount  vert,  a  hen  sable,  combed  gules  (Henneberg),  12  argent, 
three  barrulets  azure  (Eisenberg) ;  over  all  an  inescutcheon  of  Saxony,  surmounted 
by  the  crown  of  Saxony,  viz.,  barry  often  sable  and  or,  a  crown  of  rue  in  bend  vert. 
Crests — I,  Out  of  a  crown  apyramidical  cylinder  charged  with  the  arms  of  Saxony 
terminating  in  a  crown,  therefrom  a  plume  of  peacock  feathers  (Saxony)  ;  2.  out 
of  a  crown  two  horns  argent,  adorned  with  linden  leaves  vert  (Thuringia) ;  3.  a 
man's  head  and  shoulders  proper  in  a  cape  paly  of  gules  and  argent,  on  his  head 
a  long  cap  of  the  same  terminating  in  a  bunch  of  peacock  feathers  (Meissen)  ; 
4.  a  dog's  head  per  pale  argent  and  sable  (Voightland) ;  5.  out  of  a  crown  a  wing 
per  fesse  embattled  azure  and  or,  the  latter  masoned  sable  (Oberlausitz). 
Supporters — Two  lions  regardant  or.     Motto — "  Providentiae  memor." 

Ordinarily  the  simple  arms  of  Saxony  alone  on  a  shield  surmounted  with 
the  crown  and  with  the  Supporters  is  all  that  is  used. 


704 


SAXONY,  KINGDOM  OF 


SAXONY,  KINGDOM  OF 


8V 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SAXONY,  Province  of  (Prussia).  Barry  of  ten  or  and  sable,  a  crown  of  rue  in 
bend  vert.  Crest — Out  of  a  crown  a  pyramidical  cylinder  charged  with  the  arms 
ending  in  a  crown,  from  which  issues  a  bunch  of  peacock  feathers.  Supporters — 
(Dexter)asavage  holding  a  banner  of  Prussia;  (sinister)  a  man  incomplete  armour, 
on  his  head  a  plume  of  feathers  or  and  sable,  supporting  a  banner  of  the  arms  of 
Saxony  as  above. 

SCANDINAVIA.     Refer  to  Denmark. 

SCARBOROUGH  (Yorkshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  arms  of  Lumley 
(Earls  of  Scarborough),  "  Argent,  a  fesse  gules  between  three  popinjays  vert," 
are  sometimes  quoted  as  belonging  to  the  town,  but  a  copy  of  the  seal  usually 
answers  the  purposes  of  insignia.  This,  which  is  very  ancient,  shows  a  ship,  a 
watch-tower,  and  a  star.    Legend,  "  Sigillum  comune  Burgensin  de  Scardeburg." 

SCHAFFHAUSEN,  Canton  (Switzerland).  Argent,  a  ram  saliant  sable,  crowned 
or.     Supporter — (Behind  the  shield)  a  ram  in  full  aspect  sable,  armed  or. 

SCHAFFHAUSEN,  Town  of  (Canton  of  Schaffhausen,  Switzerland).     Or,  on 
a  mount  in    base   vert,   a  city   gateway  issuing   from   the  sinister  side   of  the 
escutcheon  argent,  and  therefrom  a  ram  springing  sable  horned  and  crowned  or. 
[As  augmented  in  15  12  by  Pope  Julius  II.] 


706 


SAXONY,  PROVINCE  OF 


SCHAFFHAUSEN,  TOWN  OF 


SCHAFFHAUSEN,  CANTON 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SCHAUMBURG-LIPPE,  Principality  of.  Quarterly  :  i  and  4,  argent,  a  rose 
gules  ;  2  and  3,  gules,  on  an  eight-pointed  star  or,  a  martlet  sable:  an  inescutcheon 
of  Holstein.  Crests — i.  Seven  banners  of  Holstein  between  two  sceptres  or,  from 
each  a  plume  of  peacock  feathers  issuing  ;  2.  out  of  a  crown  a  rose  gules 
between  two  wings  per  fesse  argent  and  gules  and  counterchanged  ;  3.  on  a 
wreath  an  eight-pointed  star  or,  between  two  horns  per  fesse  or  and  gules  and 
counterchanged.  Supporters — Two  angels  proper  vested  and  winged  argent,  each 
holding  a  branch  of  palm. 

SCHEGEDIN  (Hungary).  Per  pale,  dexter  azure,  two  bends  argent,  sinister  a 
dimidiated  eagle  displayed  sable,  armed  and  crowned  and  holding  in  its  claw  a 
sceptre  or. 

SCHLESWIG.     Refer  to  Slesvig. 

SCHLESWIG-HOLSTEIN,  Province  of  (Prussia).  Per  pale  dexter  or,  two 
lions  passant  in  pale  azure  (for  Schleswig) ;  sinister,  gules,  an  inescutcheon  per 
fesse  argent  and  of  the  field  within  three  nettle-leaves  and  as  many  passion 
nails  alternately  disposed  in  orle  (Holstein).  Ci'est — Out  of  a  crown  three 
sceptres  or,  each  terminating  in  a  bunch  of  peacock  feathers,  between  four 
banners  of  the  arms  of  Holstein,  two  on  either  side.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a 
savage  supporting  a  banner  of  Prussia  ;  (sinister)  a  man  in  complete  armour,  on 
his  head  a  plume  of  four  feathers  azure  or  gules  and  argent,  holding  in  his  hand 
a  banner  of  Schleswig-Holstein  as  above. 


708 


SCHAUMBURG-LIPPE 


SCHEGEDIN 


SCHLESWIG-HOLSTEIN 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SCHWARZBURG-SONDERHAUSEN,  Principality  of.  Or,  an  eagle  displayed 
with  two  heads  sable,  each  head  within  a  nimbus  and  between  them  an  imperial 
crown,  the  dexter  claw  holding  a  sceptre,  the  sinister  an  orb  ;  on  the  breast  an 
inescutcheon  of  the  field,  thereon  a  crown,  in  base  a  hayfork  and  a  comb,  both 
fesseways  gules.  The  full  achievement  with  quarterings  is  as  shown  in  the 
illustration. 

SCHWEIZ,  Canton  (Switzerland).  Gules,  in  the  sinister  chief  point  a  cross  couped 
argent.  Supporter — On  the  sinister,  a  Swiss  in  complete  armour,  on  his  sinister 
arm  a  shield  with  the  arms  of  the  canton,  his  dexter  arm  supporting  the  shield 
and  also  holding  a  banner  of  the  arms. 

SCHWERIN  (Germany).  Azure,  a  chevalier  on  horseback  armed  cap-a-pie,  on  his 
arm  a  shield  charged  with  a  lion  passant,  and  carrying  a  standard  all  or. 

SCIENCE  AND  TECHNOLOGY.  Refer  to  Imperial  College  of  Science  and 
Technology. 


710 


SCHWARZBURG-  SONDERHAUSEN 


SCHWERIN 


SCHWEIZ 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SCOTLAND.  The  entry  in  Lyon  Register,  dated  1672,  is  as  follows: — 
The  blason  of  the  atchevement  of  the  King  of  Scotland. 
The  most  high  and  mighty  Monarch  Charles  the  second  Gives  as  the 
Soveraigne  atchivement  of  his  antient  Kingdome  of  Scotland,  Or,  a  Lyon  rampant 
gules  armed  and  langued  azure  within  a  double  tressur  flowered  and  counter- 
flowered  with  flowers  de  lis  of  the  second,  Encircled  with  the  order  of  Scotland 
the  same  being  composed  of  Rue  and  thistles  having  the  Image  of  St.  Andrew 
with  his  crosse  on  his  brest  y  unto  pendent.  Above  the  shield  ane  Helmet 
answerable  to  his  Majesties  high  qualitie  and  jurisdiction  with  a  mantle  or 
doubled  ermine  adorned  with  ane  Imperiall  Crowne  beautified  with  crosses 
pattee  and  flowers  de  lis  surmounted  on  the  top  for  his  Majesties  Crest  of  a  Lyon 
sejant  full  faced  gules  crowned  or  holding  in  his  dexter  paw  a  naked  sword 
proper  and  in  the  sinister  a  Scepter  both  erected  paleways  supported  be  two 
Unicornes  Argent  crowned  with  Imperiall  and  goarged  with  open  Crownes,  to  the 
last  chains  affixed  passing  betwixt  their  fore  leggs  and  reflexed  over  their  backs 
or,  he  on  the  dexter  imbracing  and  bearing  up  a  banner  of  cloath  of  gold 
charged  with  the  Royall  Armes  of  Scotland  and  he  on  the  sinister  another  Banner 
azure  charged  with  a  St.  Andrews  Crosse  argent,  both  standing  on  ane  compart- 
ment placed  underneath  from  which  issue  thistles  one  towards  each  side  of  the 
escutcheon,  and  for  his  Majisties  Royall  Motto's  in  ane  escroll  over  all  In  defence, 
and  under  on  the  table  of  the  compartment  Nemo  me  impune  lacessit. 
[Refer  to  Great  Britain.] 

The  Act  of  Union  provided  that  the  Arms  of  the  United  Kingdom  should 
be  declared  by  Her  Majesty,  and  one  version  for  the  United  Kingdom  was  called 
into  being.  No  warrant  for  any  special  version  of  the  Royal  Arms  for  use  in  Scot- 
land has  ever  been  issued,  but  for  the  purposes  of  the  Great  Seal  of  Scotland  a 
special  design  was  submitted  to  King  Edward  VII.,  who  approved  the  same  by 
Order  in  Council,  nth  August  1903.  The  seal  is  illustrated  and  described  in 
the  Report  of  the  Deputy-Master  of  the  Mint  for  1904,  and  annexed  to  the 
illustration  is  the  following  description  of  "  The  Royal  Arms  of  Scotland,"  viz. : — 
Anns — Quarterly,  First  and  Fourth,  or,  a  lion  rampant  within  a  double  tressure 
flory,  counterflory  gules  ;  Second,  gules,  three  lions  passant  guardant  in  pale  or  ; 
Third,  azure,  a  harp  or,  stringed  argent.  The  shield  is  surrounded  by  the  collar 
of  the  Order  of  the  Thistle  with  the  St  Andrew  pendant  therefrom.  Crest — On 
the  Royal  Crown  proper,  a  lion  sejant  aff'rontee  gules,  holding  in  his  dexter  paw 
a  sword  and  in  his  sinister  a  sceptre  erect,  also  proper.  Supporters — De.xter,  a 
unicorn  argent,  armed,  crlned  and  unguled  or,  gorged  with  a  coronet  composed 
of  crosses  pattee  and  fleurs-de-lis,  a  chain  affixed  thereto,  reflexed  over  the  back 
and  fastened  to  a  staple  below,  of  the  last,  and  holding  erect  a  lance  ensigned 
with  the  flag  of  Scotland,  azure,  a  saltire  argent.  Sinister,  a  lion  guardant  or, 
crowned  with  the  Royal  crown  proper,  holding  erect  a  lance  ensigned  with  the 
flag  of  England  argent,  a  cross  gules.  Motto — Over  the  crest,  "In  defens." 
[The  seal  itself  shows  the  unicorn  crowned  with  a  similar  crown  to  the  lion, 
which  fact  is  omitted  in  the  description.]     A  similar  design  appears  upon  the 

712 


SCOTLAND 


AS  USED  IN  SCOTLAND 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

Great  Seal  of  Scotland  of  King  George  V.  This  order  in  Council  is  in  Scotland 
held  to  authorise  this  version  of  the  Royal  Arms  for  general  use  in  that  country, 
but  it  really  has  no  such  legal  effect.  If  either  king  had  intended  or  desired 
such  a  result,  the  intention  would  have  been  declared  by  a  proper  Warrant 
issued  in  a  proper  way.  Arms  for  the  United  Kingdom  are  one  thing,  arms  for 
that  part  of  it  called  Scotland  are  another,  but  the  foregoing  design  is  neither. 

SCOTLAND.  Refer  to  Antiquaries,  Archers,  Armour-Bearer,  Bank  of,  Church  of, 
Earl  Marischal,  Educational  Institute  of,  Hereditary  Great  Master  of  the  House- 
hold in,  Linen  Manufacturers  in,  Lord  High  Chamberlain,  Lord  High  Constable, 
Lord  Justice-General,  National  Bank  of,  North  of  Scotland  Banking  Company, 
Revels,  Master  of,  and  Ushers. 

SCOTLAND,  Heritable  Usher  for.     Refer  to  Walker  Trustees. 

SCOTLAND,  Company  of,  trading  to  Africa  and  the  Indies.  Azure,  a  saltire 
argent,  between  a  ship  under  sail  flagged  of  Scotland  in  chief  proper,  a  Peruvian 
sheep  in  base,  a  camel  on  the  dexter  and  an  elephant  on  the  sinister  [proper],  the 
first  two  of  these  loaded  and'  the  last  bearing  a  turret  of  the  second.  Crest — ■ 
A  rising  sun.  Sitpporters — De.xter  an  Indian,  .sinister  a  Negro  "  au  naturel," 
each  bearing  on  his  shoulder  a  cornucopia  with  this  motto  in  an  escroU  above, 
"  Qua  panditur  orbis,"  and  in  the  table  of  the  compartment  this  symbol,  "  Vis 
unita  fortior." 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  loth  July  1696.] 

SCOTS  CORPORATION.  (Incorporated  1665.)  No  armorial  ensign  ;  the  seal 
represents  the  figure  of  Charity,  with  one  child  in  her  arms  and  three  others 
standing  near  her,  naked  ;  on  the  dexter  side  a  shield,  hung  on  a  tree,  bearing 
the  arms  of  St  Andrew,  viz.,  Argent  a  saltire  azure,  to  which  the  figure  is  pointing 
with  the  dexter  hand  ;  on  the  sinister  side  of  the  escutcheon  a  thistle  issuing 
from  the  ground  in  base,  stalked  and  leaved,  over  it  a  regal  crown ;  round  the 
seal  the  legend — "  Beati  misericordes,  quoniam  ipsis  misericordia  tribuetur." 

SCRIVENERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  28th 
January  1617.)  Azure,  an  eagle  with  wings  expanded  or,  standing  on  a  book 
in  base  lying  fessewise  gules,  close  clasped  and  garnished  of  the  second  holding 
in  his  mouth  a  penner  and  inkhorn  sable,  stringed  gules.  Crest — On  a  wreath 
of  the  colours,  a  dexter  arm  issuing  from  the  clouds  proper,  vested  or,  cuffed 
argent,  in  the  hand  a  pen  as  if  writing  on  the  wreath.  Mottoes — (Over  crest) 
"  Scribite  Scientes,"  (under  arms)  "  Litera  scripta  manet."  Supporters — Two 
Counsellors  habited  in  their  gowns  and  caps  as  worn  in  the  reign  of  Queen 
Elizabeth,  each  holding  in  his  exterior  hand  a  parchment  roll  proper. 

[Arms  confirmed  and  crest  and  supporters  granted  by  Henry  St  George, 
Clarenceux,  nth  November  1634.] 

SCULPTORS'  COMPANY  (Gateshead).     Refer  to  Marblers. 

714 


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THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SEAFORD  (Sussex).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  Two  seals  are  recorded  in 
the  College  of  Arms.  The  larger  bears  upon  its  obverse  a  bird  regardant  with 
wings  endorsed,  and  the  legend  "  Sigillum  burgensium  de  Saefordia";  and 
upon  the  reverse,  upon  waves  of  the  sea  a  three-masted  ship,  the  sail  on  the 
main-mast  set  and  on  the  others  furled,  and  each  having  a  pennon,  with  the 
legend  "With  Suttonij  et  Chyngton."  The  smaller  seal  has  an  eagle  displayed 
looking  to  the  sinister,  with  the  legend  "  Sigillum  Balivi  de  Sa^ford."  Berry 
seems  to  have  confused  the  two  seals. 

SECRETARIES,  CHARTERED  INSTITUTE  OF  (London).     Ermine,  on  a 
pale  engrailed  azure,  between  two  keys  in  pale  wards  downward  or,  a  quill  pen 
palewise  argent.    Crest — On  a  key  fessewise,  wards  downward  and  to  the  sinister 
or,  a  Secretary  bird  close  proper.     Motto — "  Semper  vigilans." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  May  2,  1903.] 

SEDBERGH  SCHOOL  (Sedbergh,  Yorkshire).  Argent,  on  a  chevron  gules, 
between  three  wolves'  heads  erased  vert,  as  many  lilies  argent  slipped  and 
leaved  of  the  third,  on  a  chief  of  the  second  a  tau  between  two  escallops  or. 
Motto — "  Dura  virum  nutrix." 

[Of  no  authority,  being  the  arms  of  Roger  Lupton  the  founder] 

SEKFORD'S  ALMSHOUSE  (Woodbridge,  Suffolk).  Ermine,  on  a  fess  gules, 
three  escallops  argent,  a  crescent  of  the  second  in  chief  (for  difference)  being  the 
arms  borne  by  Thomas  Sekford,  Esquire,  the  Founder,  with  the  addition  of  a 
bordure  azure,  thereon  eight  roses  argent,  each  surmounted  of  another  rose  gules. 
Motto — "  Orationes  et  eleemosynoe  ascendunt  in  memoriam  coram  Deo." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms.] 

SELKIRK  (County  of).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  Those 
claimed,  and  which  appear  upon  the  seal  of  the  County  Council,  are  said  to 
have  been  suggested  by  Sir  Walter  Scott,  and  are,  (Argent?)  on  a  mount  in 
base  a  stag  lodged  regardant  in  front  of  a  tree,  all  proper.  Motto — "  Leal  to 
the  Border." 

SELKIRK  (Selkirkshire).  Has  not  matriculated  any  armorial  bearings.  The 
various  seals  all  represent  the  Holy  Virgin  with  her  Child  seated  on  a  throne, 
trees  growing  from  behind  the  throne,  and  at  her  feet  an  escutcheon  charged 
with  the  Royal  Arms  of  Scotland.  Upon  the  Town-Clerk's  notepaper  a 
similiar  design  appears,  but  clouds  are  substituted  for  the  trees,  and  in  place 
of  the  legend  is  the  Motto — "  Et  spreta  incolvmem  vita  defendere  famam." 


716 


SECRETARIES,  CHARTERED  INSTITUTE  OF 


SEDBERGH  SCHOOL 


SEKFORD'S  ALMSHOUSE 


SELKIRK,  COUNTY  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SELKIRK,  See  of  (Canada).  Per  fesse  vert  and  argent,  over  all  an  open  book 
between  in  chief  three  pine  trees  paleways  in  fesse,  and  in  base  a  bear  passant 
proper. 

[Of  no  authority.     See  now  known  as  Yukon.] 

SELYWN    COLLEGE   (Cambridge).     The  arms  of  the    See  of  Lichfield  (the 
crosses    counterchanged),    impaling    the    arms    of   Selwyn    argent,    on    a   bend 
cottised  sable,  a  bordure  engrailed  gules,  in  chief  a  crescent  for  difference. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

SENESCHALL  OF  IRELAND.  Refer  to  Hereditary  Lord  Great  Seneschal  of 
Ireland. 

SERAMPORE  COLLEGE  (Bengal).     Argent,  a  cross  gules,  on  a  chief  azure,  an 
open  book  or,  the  pages  argent,  between  two  crosses  pattee  gules,  pierced  of  the 
first,  fimbriated  of  the  fourth.     Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  upon  clouds, 
a  pelican  in  her  piety  all  proper.     Motto — "  Gloriam  sapientes  possidebunt." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  4th  April  191 3.] 

SERJEANTS'  INN  (Fleet  Street,  London).  Gules,  two  garbs  in  saltire  or, 
banded  azure. 

[Of  no  authority.] 

SERJEANTS' INN,  OLD  (Chancery  Lane,  London).     Or,  a  stork  proper. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

SERVIA.     Gules,  a  boar's  head  erect  proper,  pierced  by  an  arrow  in  pale  argent. 

[These    are   the    arms    of   Servia    as    formerly  borne  by  Austria.     As    an 
independent  State  different  arms  have  been  adopted.] 

SERVIA,  Kingdom  of.  Gules,  an  eagle  displayed  with  two  heads  argent,  armed 
or  between  two  fleurs-de-lis  in  base  azure,  surmounted  by  an  inescutcheon  of 
the  field  thereon,  on  a  cross  between  four  fusils  argent,  a  sword  in  pale  point 
upwards  azure. 

SEVILLE  (Spain).  Argent,  three  torches,  one  in  pale  and  two  in  saltire  inflamed 
and  interlaced  with  a  cord  all  proper,  the  whole  between  the  letters  "  N  O  "  on 
the  dexter  and  "  D  O  "  on  the  sinister. 

SEYCHELLES  ISLANDS.  No  warrant  assigning  arms  has  yet  been  issued  to 
the  Seychelles  Islands.  The  device  published  by  the  Admiralty  is  a  landscape 
disc  showing  a  palm  tree  and  the  motto,  "  Finis  coronat  opus." 


718 


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SELKIRK,  SEE  OF 


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SERAMPORE  COLLEGE 


SEVILLE 


SERVIA,  KINGDOM  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SHAFTESBURY  (Dorsetshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  following  are 
quoted  by  Burke  in  his  "  General  Armory,"  and  by  Berry  : — "  Quarterly  ar. 
and  az.  a  cross  counterchanged  ;  in  the  first  and  fourth  quarters  a  fleur-de-lis 
of  the  second,  in  the  second  and  third  quarters  a  leopard's  face  of  the  first." 
Upon  the  Corporation  notepaper  the  foregoing  coat-of-arms  appears  within 
the  legend,  "  Sigillum  officii  maiora  us  burgi  Shaston  "  ;  but  the  leopards'  faces 
are  or. 

SHANTUNG,  See  of  (China).     Azure,  a  range  of  mountains  proper,  on  a  chief  or, 
a  pale  gules  charged  with  a  cross  moline  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

SHEERMEN,  Fraternity  of.  An  ancient  name  for  the  Cloth-Workers'  Company, 
to  which  refer. 

SHEFFIELD,  See  of.     Azure,  a  crosier  in  pale  ensigned  by  a  fleur-de-lis  between 
in  fesse  a  key  surmounted  by  a  sword  in  saltire  to  the  dexter  and  to  the  sinister 
eight  arrows  interlaced  and  banded  saltirewise,  all  or. 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  21st  April  191 4.] 


720 


SHAFTESBURY 


SHANTUNG,  SEE  OF 


SHEFFIELD,  SEE  OF 


2Z 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SHEFFIELD  (Yorkshire).  Per  fess  azure  and  vert,  in  chief  eight  arrows  in 
saltire  banded  argent,  and  in  base  three  garbs  or  ;  and  for  the  Crest — Upon 
a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  Hon  rampant  argent,  collared  gemel  azure,  holding 
an  ancient  shield  also  azure,  thereon  eight  arrows  as  in  the  arms.  Supporters — 
On  the  dexter  side,  a  figure  habited  as  Thor,  resting  his  exterior  hand  on  a 
hammer,  all  proper;  and  on  the  sinister  side,  a  figure  habited  as  Vulcan 
standing  in  front  of  an  anvil,  and  in  the  dexter  hand  a  pair  of  pincers,  all  also 
proper.  Motto — "  Deo  adjuvante  labor  proficit."  The  supporters  were  added 
to  the  arms  of  Sheffield  by  a  grant  dated  August  31,  1893,  consequent  upon 
the  elevation  of  that  town  to  the  rank  and  dignity  of  a  city. 

SHEFFIELD  UNIVERSITY.     Refer  to  University  of  Sheffield. 

SHERBORNE  SCHOOL.       Uses  the   arms   of  King  Edward  VI.,  the  founder, 
i.e.  France  and  England  quarterly.     Motto — "  Dieu  et  mon  droit." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

SHIELDS.     See  North  Shields  and  South  Shields. 

SHIP  CARPENTERS.     Refer  to  Stornoway,  Incorporated  Trades  of. 

SHIPWRIGHTS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  1905.) 
Azure,  in  the  sea  the  hulk  of  a  ship  or,  on  a  chief  argent,  a  cross  gules,  charged 
with  a  lion  passant  guardant  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  or  and  azure,  on  an  ark 
sable,  resting  on  a  mount  vert,  a  dove  proper,  bearing  an  olive  branch. 
Motto—''  Within  the  ark  safe  for  ever." 

[Arms  granted,  College  of  Arms,  1605.] 

[Berry  blazons  this  coat  "azure,  an  antique  hulk,  the  stern  terminating  with 
the  head  of  a  dragon,  in  the  hulk  the  ark  with  three  doors  in  the  side,  from  the 
ark  against  the  side  a  step  ladder  all  or,  on  a  chief  argent,"  etc.,  and  he  makes 
the  ark  in  the  crest  gold.] 

SHOEMAKERS,  The  Craft  and  Incorporation  of  (Aberdeen).      Gules,  a  shoe- 
maker's shaping  knife  fesseways,  edge  upwards,  the  blade  proper,  and  hafted 
argent,  over  the  same  a  crown  or,  and  in  a  dexter  canton  a  tower  triple  towered 
of  Aberdeen.     Alotto — "  Lord,  crown  us  with  glory." 
[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  iSth  May  1682.] 

SHOEMAKERS'  COMPANY  (London).     Refer  to  Cordwainers'  Company. 

SHOEMAKERS.     Refer  to  Stornoway,  Incorporated  Trades  of. 

SHOEMAKERS' GUILD.  (Winterthur,  in  the  Canton  of  Zurich,  1583.)  Gules, 
above  a  pointed  shoe  sable,  a  draw-knife  argent,  the  handle  or. 

SHOREDITCH,  Borough  of  (London).  Has  no  arms.  Those  in  use  are  a 
bi-corporated  lion  ducally  crowned,  the  head  in  chief.  Motto — "  More  light, 
more  power." 

[Of  no  authority.] 

722 


SHEFFIELD 


SHIPWRIGHTS,  COMPANY  OF 


SHOREDITCH 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SHOREHAM  (Sussex).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  of  the  High 
Constable  represents  party  per  pale,  the  dexter  side  argent  crusuly  sable,  a 
lion  rampant  towards  the  sinister  azure;  the  sinister  side  gules,  three  lions 
passant  guardant  in  pale  or. 

SHREWSBURY,  Otherwise  SALOP.     Azure,  three  leopards'  faces  or. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.]     Motto — "  Floreat  Salopia." 

SHREWSBURY  SCHOOL.     Uses  the  arms  of  King  Edward  VI.,  the  founder, 
i.e.  France  and  England  quarterly.     Motto — "  Intus  si  recte  ne  labora." 
[Of  no  authority.] 

SHROPSHIRE.  Erminois,  three  piles 'azure,  two  issuant  from  the  chief  and  one 
in  base,  each  charged  with  a  leopard's  face  or.     Motto — "  Floreat  Salopia." 

[Granted  i8th  June  1896.  The  grant  is  reproduced  in  facsimile  in  the 
Genealogical  Magazine,  vol.  ii.  p.  2.  The  fees  were  defrayed  by  Sir  Oftley 
Wakeman,  Bart.] 


724 


SHOREHAM 


SHREWSBURY 


SHREWSBURY  SCHOOL 


SHROPSHIRE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SIAM,   Kingdom  of.     Refer  to  illustration. 

SIBERIA.     Refer  to  Russia. 

SICILY.  Per  saltire  in  chief  and  in  base  the  arms  of  Arragon  (or,  four  pallets  gules), 
in  flanks  argent  an  eagle  displayed  sable. 

SIDNEY  AND  SUSSEX  COLLEGE  (Cambridge).  (Founded  in  1 595  by  Frances, 
daughter  of  Sir  William  Sidney,  Knt,  and  widow  of  Thomas  Radcliff,  Earl  of 
Sussex.)  Argent,  a  bend  engrailed  sable  for  Radcliff,  impaling  Or,  a  pheon  azure, 
for  Sidney. 

[Granted  by  Sir  Edward  Walker,  Garter,  1675.] 

SIERRA  LEONE.  No  warrant  assigning  arms  has  as  yet  been  issued  to  Sierra 
Leone,  but  the  following  arms  are  in  general  use  :  "  Argent,  issuant  from  a 
mount  in  base  a  palm-tree  proper,  on  a  chief  indented  azure,  a  lion  passant 
guardant  or." 

[These  arms  are  quite  unauthorised.  The  device  published  by  the  Admiralty 
for  use  upon  the  Union  flag  by  the  Governor  is  a  landscape  disc,  thereon  an 
elephant  in  front  of  a  palm  tree,  a  range  of  mountains  in  the  background.  The 
letters  S.L.  are  in  base.  The  same  device,  with  the  letters  G.C.,  is  published  for 
the  Gold  Coast,  and  also  with  the  letter  G  for  Gambia.] 

SIERRA  LEONE,  See  ol.     Argent,  a  lion  couchant  in   front  of  a  serrated  rock 
proper,  on  a  chief  gules,  two  trumpets  in  saltire,  mouths  upwards  of  the  first. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

SIGNET,  Society  of  Writers  to.     Refer  to  Writers  to  the  Signet. 


726 


SIAM 


SICILY 


SIDNEY  AND  SUSSEX  COLLEGE 


SIERRA  LEONE,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
SILESIA.     Refer  to  Austria. 

SILESIA,  Province  of  (Prussia).  Or,  an  eagle  displayed  sable,  crowned  and 
armed  of  the  field,  on  its  breast  and  wings  a  crescent  and  crosslet  conjoined 
argent.  Crest — On  an  oval  medallion  or,  the  edge  ornamented  with  peacock 
feathers  proper,  the  arms  of  Silesia  as  above.  Stipporters — (Dexter)  a  savage 
holding  a  banner  of  Prussia ;  (sinister)  a  man  in  complete  armour,  on  his  head 
a  plume  of  feathers  argent  and  or,  holding  a  banner  of  the  arms  of  Silesia 
as  above. 

SILK-THROWSTERS'  COMPANY,  London.  Argent,  three  bundles  or  hanks 
of  silk  in  fesse  sable  on  a  chief  azure,  a  silk-thrower's  mill  or.  Crest — On  a 
wreath  of  the  colours,  a  mount  vert,  thereon  a  mulberry  tree  with  silk-worms 
variously  dispersed  all  proper.  Supporters. — Two  Janissary  guards  proper, 
habited  in  the  dress  of  the  country  {i.e.  with  turbans  on  their  heads,  coats  a  little 
way  down  their  arms,  and  half  boots  rolled  all  proper),  each  having  a  hank  of 
silk  hanging  over  his  e.xterior  arm  ;  the  dexter  holding  a  battle-axe  erect,  the 
sinister  a  scimitar,  the  point  downwards  of  the  last.  Motto — "  God  in  his  least 
creatures." 

[Arms  and  crest  granted  by  John  Smert,  Garter,  20th  October  1464.] 

SILKMEN,  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated  temp.  Charles  I.)  Argent,  a 
ship  of  three  masts  in  full  sail  on  the  sea  in  base  all  proper,  on  a  chief  azure,  a 
bale  of  silk  corded  argent  between  two  bundles  of  silk  pendent  proper.  Crest — 
On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  Janissary  guard  habited  gules,  undercoat  azure, 
breeches  purpure,  stockings  or,  turban  gules,  turned  up  argent,  holding  in  his 
dexter  hand  a  battle-axe  erect  or  headed  argent,  and  over  his  dexter  arm  a 
hank  of  silk,  his  sinister  arm  supporting  an  antique  shield  or,  charged  with  an 
escutcheon  azure  charged  with  a  sun  in  splendour.  Supporters — Two  camels  or, 
each  bridled  sable  and  loaded  with  two  bales  of  silk  argent. 
[Granted  by  St  George,  Clarenceux,  163 1.] 

SINGAPORE.     Refer  to  Straits  Settlements. 

SINGAPORE,  See  of.     Argent,  a  saltire  gules. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

SINGAPORE,  LABUAN,  AND  SARAWAK,  See  of.     Per  fesse  in  chief  a  saltire 
and  in  base  a  pastoral  staff  surmounted  by  two  keys  addorsed  in  saltire. 
[Of  no  authority.     This  See  is  now  divided.] 

SION  COLLEGE  (London).     Argent,  on  a  chevron  between  three  griffins'  heads 
erased  sable,  a  leopard's  face  or. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

SIX  CLERKS'  OFFICE.     Refer  to  Kidderminster  Inn. 

728 


SILESIA 


SINGAPORE,  SEE  OF 


SION  COLLEGE 


SINGAPORE,  LABUAN,  AND  SARAWAK,  SEE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 
SKINNERS,  United  Company  of  Glovers  and  (Exeter).     Refer  to  Glovers. 

SKINNERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  ist  March 
1327.)  Ermine,  on  a  chief  gules  three  princes'  crowns  composed  of  crosses 
pattee  and  fleurs-de-lis  or,  with  caps  of  the  first,  tasselled  of  the  third.  Crest — 
On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  lizard  proper,  wreathed  about  the  neck  with 
laurel  leaves  vert,  purfled  or.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  lizard  or  short-tailed  wild 
cat  of  Norway  rampant  guardant  proper,  i.e.  of  a  dark  brown  colour  spotted 
with  black,  (sinister)  a  martin  sable,  each  gorged  with  a  wreath  of  laurel  leaves 
vert,  purfled  or.     Motto — "  To  God  only  be  all  glory." 

[Arms   granted    by    Hawley,    Clarenceu.x,    5th  October    1551  ;    crest   and 
supporters  by  William  Hervey,  Clarenceux,  granted  1561.] 

SKINNERS  (Edinburgh).  Berry  in  his  description  of  the  arms  on  the  Gold 
Medal  of  the  Deacon-Convener  of  the  Corporate  Bodies  of  Trades  in  Edin- 
burgh (refer  sub  Edinburgh)  gives  for  the  Skinners  "party  per  fesse  gules  and 
argent,  a  pale  counterchanged,  on  the  first,  three  goats  salient  of  the  second." 
But  these  arms  so  closely  resemble  the  arms  of  the  Glovers  of  London  that 
perhaps  Berry  is  wrong  and  that  the  arms  used  by  the  Skinners  of  Edinburgh 
are  really  the  ne.xt  coat,  "  ermine,  on  a  chief  gules,  three  imperial  crowns  proper," 
which  he  assigns  to  the  Furriers  of  Edinburgh,  but  which  are  identical  with  the 
arms  of  the  Skinners  of  London  and  the  United  Glovers  and  Skinners  of  Exeter. 
[No  arms  are  matriculated  in  Lyon  Register.     Refer  sub  Edinburgh.] 

SLESVIG.     Refer  to  Denmark. 

SLIGO  (County).      Has  no  armorial  bearings. 

SLIGO,  City  of  (Co.  Sligo).  Has  no  armorial  bearings  registered  in  Ulster's  Office. 
The  design  upon  the  seal  which  does  duty  represents  a  ruined  building  overhung 
by  a  tree,  and  a  hare  courant  therefrom. 

SMITHS.  Refer  to  Blacksmiths,  Hammermen,  and  see  Stornoway,  Incorporated 
Trades  of 

SMITH'S  COMPANY  (Exeter).  Used  for  arms.  "  Sable,  a  chevron  argent, 
between  three  hammers  or,  ducally  crowned  of  the  last."  Motto — "  Tractent 
fabrillia  fabri." 

[The  arms,  which  are  recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms,  are  those  of  the 
Blacksmiths'  Company  of  London,  to  which  refer.] 


730 


SKINNERS,  COMPANY  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SOAP  BOILERS'  COMPANY  (London).  (Sometimes  called  the  Soap  Makers 
Company.  Incorporated  22nd  May  1638.)  Azure,  a  whale  proper  between 
three  harpoons  argent.  Cres/— On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  on  a  mount  vert,  an 
olive  tree  proper,  the  trunk  environed  by  a  ducal  coronet  or.  Supporters — Two 
Muscovites  proper  with  long  robes  azure,  garnished  or,  vested  gules,  breeches 
azure,  long  boots  or,  caps  azure,  turned  up  argent,  feathers  proper,  each  holding 
over  the  shoulder  a  battle-axe  or,  headed  argent.  Motto — "  Dii  rexque 
secundent." 

[Granted  by  Borough,  Garter.     Misc.  Gts.  iv.  6.] 

SODBURY.      See  Chipping  Sodbury. 

SODOR  AND  MAN,  See  of.  Standing  on  a  pavement  in  fesse  chequy  a  re- 
presentation of  the  Virgin  Mary,  her  arms  extended  between,  and  the  hands 
holding  two  pillars,  the  dexter  pillar  charged  with  a  church,  in  base  an 
escutcheon  of  the  arms  of  Man  ensigned  with  a  mitre. 

[These  arms  are  recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms,  but  no  colours  are  noted 
in  the  record.  The  field  is  usually  stated  to  be  argent,  and  the  charges  all 
proper,  which  is  probably  correct.  Woodward,  however,  in  his  "  Ecclesiastical 
Heraldry,"  makes  the  field  gules,  though  on  what  authority  does  not  appear.] 

SOLICITORS'  SOCIETY.     Refer  to  Attorneys. 

SOLOTHURN,  Canton  (Switzerland).  Per  fesse  gules  and  argent.  Supporter 
— Sinister,  a  Swiss  in  complete  armour,  holding  a  banner  of  the  arms  all 
proper. 

SOMALILAND.  No  arms  exist  for  Somaliland,  but  the  Admiralty  publish  as  the 
device  to  be  used  upon  the  Union  flag  by  the  Governor,  a  white  disc  with  the 
head  and  shoulders  of  an  antelope  issuing  to  the  sinister  from  the  dexter  base. 

SOMERSET  COUNTY  COUNCIL.  Or,  a  dragon  rampant  gules,  holding  in  the 
claws  a  mace  erect  azure. 

[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  December  9,  191 1.] 

SOMERS  ISLANDS,  otherwise  the  BERMUDAS.     Refer  to  Bermudas. 

SONNENBURG,  County  of  Azure,  a  hill  in  base  or,  surmounted  by  the  sun  in 
its  splendour. 

SONS  OF  THE  CLERGY  CORPORATION.  Refer  to  Clergymen's  Widows 
and  Children. 

SORBANO,  Province  of  (Florence).  Or,  a  mountain  ash-tree  proper,  fructed 
gules,  issuing  from  a  mount  in  base  vert,  supported  by  two  lions,  the  dexter 
vert  and  the  sinister  gules,  over  all  on  a  chief  argent,  a  fleur-de-lis  gules. 


732 


SOMERSET  COUNTY  COUNCIL 


SODOR  AND  MAN,   SEE  OF 


SONNENBURG 


SORBANO 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC'ARMS 

SOUTH  AFRICA,  Union  of.  Quarterly  per  fesse  wavy  the  first  quarter  gules,  a 
female  figure  representing  Hope,  resting  the  dexter  arm  upon  a  rock,  and 
supporting  with  the  sinister  hand  an  anchor  argent ;  second  quarter  or,  two 
black  Wildebeesten  in  full  course  at  random  both  proper  ;  third  quarter  or, 
upon  an  island  an  Orange  tree  vert,  fructed  proper ;  fourth  quarter  vert,  a  trek 
waggon  argent.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  lion  passant  guardant 
gules  supporting  with  the  dexter  paw  four  staves  erect,  alternately  argent  and 
azure  and  banded  or.  Supporters — (Dexter)  a  springbok,  (sinister)  an  oryx 
(gems  bok),  both  proper.  Motto — "  Ex  unitate  vires." 
[Assigned  by  Royal  Warrant,  1910.] 

SOUTH  AFRICA.  Refer  to  British  South  Africa  Company,  and  see  arms  for 
Cape  Colony,  Natal,  Transvaal,  Orange  River,  Cape  Town,  Johannesburg,  and 
Pretoria. 

SOUTH  AUSTRALIA,  State  of  (Commonwealth  of  Australia).      No  warrant 

assigning  arms  has  as  yet  been  issued  to  the  State  of  South  Australia,  but  the 

State  issues  the  "  State  Badge"  which  is  on  an  orange  roundle  an  Australian 

.    piping  shrike  displayed.     This  is  used  by  the  Governor  upon  the  Union  flag. 

Refer  to  Australia. 

SOUTH  MOLTON  (Devonshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  shows 
a  fleece  banded.  Above  this  is  a  royal  crown  and  below  a  bishop's  mitre 
with  the  motto,  "  Fiat  ustitia."      The  legend  is  "  Libertas  de  South  Molton." 

SOUTH  SEA  COMPANY.  (Established  by  Act  of  Parliament,  1712.)  Azure,  a 
terrestrial  globe  showing  the  Western  Hemisphere,  whereon  are  represented  the 
Continent  of  America  and  the  islands  thereunto  belonging,  together  with  the 
Straits  of  Magellan  and  the  Cape  Horn  all  proper ;  in  dexter  chief  the  arms  of 
the  United  Kingdom  of  England  and  Scotland,  and  in  sinister  two  herrings 
saltirewise  proper,  crowned  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  British 
man-of-war  under  sail,  the  men,  masts,  rigging,  and  anchors  proper,  purfled  or, 
stern,  guns,  sails,  and  lanterns  gold,  the  windows  argent,  having  her  Ensign,  Jack, 
Standard,  Union,  and  Admiralty  flags  all  displayed.  Siif>portcrs — (De.xter) 
Britannia  proper,  habited  in  a  crimson  vest,  the  girdle  about  her  waist  or, 
buttons  of  emeralds  at  her  neck  and  sleeves,  of  ruby  at  her  knee,  all  set  in  gold, 
her  under-garment  argent,  reposing  her  right  hand  upon  an  antique  shield, 
garnished  or,  charged  with  the  Union  crosses,  placed  before  a  spear  gold,  the 
head  argent,  which  rests  upon  her  right  arm,  and  holding  in  her  left  hand  the 
badge  of  the  said  United  Kingdoms  ;  (sinister)  a  fisherman  proper,  habited  in 
a  waistcoat  open  and  turned  back  at  the  collar  russet  colour,  lined  and  the  cuff's 
turned  up  crimson,  his  shirt  appearing  at  his  neck,  breast  and  hands  argent,  cap 
on  his  head  gules,  turned  up  with  fur  proper,  about  his  waist  a  girdle  buckled 
and  his  breeches  yellow,  booted  sable,  holding  on  his  left  arm  a  fishing  net 
proper.  Motto — "  A  gadibus  usque  auroram." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  171 1.] 

734 


SOUTH  AFRICA,  UNION  OF 


SOUTH  AUSTRALIA,  STATE  BADGE  OF 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SOUTH  SHIELDS.  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  exhibits  a  wonderful 
achievement,  namely,  Argent,  on  waves  of  the  sea  a  boat  with  four  rowers,  all 
rowing  the  same  side,  one  passenger  and  a  coxswain,  all  proper,  and  in  chief 
the  words  "  Always  ready."  Crest — An  anchor  in  pale  cabled,  all  proper.  Motto 
— "  Courage,  humanity,  commerce."  Supporters — On  the  dexter  side  a  sailor 
habited  and  holding  in  his  dexter  hand  a  telescope,  all  proper,  and  on  the 
sinister  side  a  female  figure  vested  in  long  garments,  the  face,  neck,  and  arms 
proper,  crowned  with  a  mural  coronet,  and  holding  in  her  exterior  hand  a 
rod  of  Esculapius.  Behind  the  escutcheon  upon  the  seal  is  a  trophy  of  two 
flags,  that  on  the  dexter  side  being  the  Union  Jack,  that  on  the  sinister  the 
Banner  of  St  George. 

SOUTH  TOKYO,  See  of      Argent,  a  cross  gules,  a  chief  harry  wavy  azure   and 
argent,  a  sun  in  splendour  issuant  in  the  midst. 
[Of  no  authority.] 


736 


SOUTH  SHIELDS 


SOUTH  TOKYO,  SEE  OF 


3* 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SOUTHAMPTON,  Bishop  of.     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

SOUTHAMPTON,  County  of,  otherwise  Hampshire.     See  Hampshire. 

SOUTHAMPTON  (Hants).  Party  per  fesse  gules  and  argent,  three  roses 
counterchanged.  Crest — Upon  a  mount  vert,  a  double  tower  or,  and  issuing 
from  the  upper  battlements  thereof  a  demy  female  affrontee  proper,  vested 
purpure,  crined  and  crowned  with  an  Eastern  coronet  also  or,  holding  in  her 
dexter  hand  a  sword  erect  point  upwards  argent,  pommel  and  hilt  of  the  second, 
and  in  her  sinister  hand  a  balance  sable,  the  pans  gold. 

In  the  visitation  book,  in  the  drawing  of  these  arms  of  Southampton, 
the  escutcheon  rests  upon  a  mount  vert,  issuing  from  waves  of  the  sea,  and 
thereupon  placed  on  either  side  of  the  escutcheon  a  ship  of  two  masts  at  anchor, 
the  sails  furled  all  proper,  the  round  top  or,  and  from  each  mast-head  flying 
a  banner  of  St  George,  upon  the  stern  of  each  vessel  a  lion  rampant  also  or, 
supporting  the  escutcheon  exactly  as  shown  in  the  illustration.  But  I  question 
if  the  whole  of  this  environment  can  be  justly  included  under  the  heading 
of  "  Supporters."  The  seal  simply  shows  upon  waves  of  the  sea  a  ship  of 
three  masts  in  full  sail,  the  main-sail  being  charged  with  the  escutcheon  onl)'. 
Legend,  "  Sigillum  commune  villas  Southamptoniae."  The  arms  are  frequently 
made  use  of  with  the  colours  reversed.  The  arms  were  granted  4th  August 
1575- 

SOUTHEND-ON-SEA  (Essex).  Azure,  on  a  pile  argent,  between  on  the 
dexter  an  anchor  erect,  on  the  sinister  a  grid-iron,  and  in  base  a  trefoil  slipped 
or,  a  flower  vase,  issuing  therefrom  a  sprig  of  lilies  proper.  Crest — Issuant  out 
of  a  mural  crown  gules,  the  mast  of  a  ship  proper  flowing  therefrom  a  flag 
argent  charged  with  a  cross  throughout  also  gules.  Suppoiiers— On  the  dexter 
side,  a  medieval  fisherman  trailing  a  net  with  his  exterior  hand  all  proper,  and 
on  the  sinister  side  a  Cluniac  monk  proper,  holding  in  the  dexter  hand  a  book 
gules  and  in  the  exterior  hand  a  staff  also  proper.  Motto — "  Per  mare  per 
ecclesiam." 

[Arms  and  Crest  granted,  College  of  Arms,  ist  January  1915  ;  Supporters, 
2nd  January  191 5.] 


7.38 


SOUTHAMPTON 


■^p,i 


v\.x^y 


SOUTHEND-ON-SEA 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SOUTHPORT  (Lancashire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  On  the  Corporation 
notepaper  the  following  arms  are  used,  which  are  quoted  by  Burke  in  his 
"  General  Armory  "  : — "  An  a  fesse  dancettde  betw.  in  chief  three  cross  crosslets 
fitchee  sa.,  and  in  base  a  lifeboat  with  men,  sky,  and  sea  all  ppr.  Crest— K 
serpent  ppr.  entwined  about  a  cross  crosslet  fitchee  sa.  Motto — '  Salus 
populi. 

SOUTHWARK,  Borough  of  (London).  Quarterly  argent  and  azure,  a  cross 
quarterly  gules  and  of  the  first  between  a  rose  of  the  third,  barbed  and  seeded 
proper  in  the  first  quarter,  a  lily  also  of  the  first,  slipped  proper,  in  the  second 
quarter,  an  annulet  ensigned  with  a  cross  pattee  and  interlaced  with  a  saltire 
conjoined  in  base  all  or  in  the  third  quarter,  and  a  stag's  head  caboshed  also  of 
the  third  in  the  fourth  quarter.  Alotto—"  United  to  serve." 
[Granted,  College  of  Arms,  14th  June  1902.] 

SOUTHWARK,  See  of.     Argent,  eleven  fusils  in  cross  conjoined,  seven  in  pale 
fessewise,  four  in  fesse  palewise,  and  in  the  dexter  chief  a  mitre  all  gules. 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.     Granted  1905] 

SOUTHWARK,  St  Saviour's  Collegiate  Church.     Argent,  a  cross  azure,  in  the 
dexter  chief  a  cinquefoil  gules. 

[Given  in  Crockford,  but  of  no  authority.] 


74° 


SOUTHPORT 


SOUTHWARK,  SEE  OF 


SOUTHWARK,  ST  SAVIOUR'S 
COLLEGIATE  CHURCH 


SOUTHWARK 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SOUTHWELL,  See  of.  Sable,  three  fountains  proper,  a  chief  or,  thereon  a  pale 
azure,  charged  with  a  representation  of  the  Virgin  Mary  seated,  bearing  the 
Infant  Christ  or,  between  a  stag  lodged  proper  on  the  dexter  side  and  on  the 
sinister  a  cross  ragulj'  vert. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.     Granted  18S4.] 

SOUTHWOLD  (Suffolk).  (Sable),  two  arrows  in  saltire  enfiled  with  a  ducal 
coronet  (or).  Crest — The  bust  of  a  man  couped  at  the  breast,  vested  and 
regally  crowned. 

Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms,  but  no  colours  are  given. 

The  seal  represents  this  coat  upon  an  escutcheon,  but  with  the  addition 
of  the  letter  S  (reversed)  in  base;  and  here  the  coronet  is  composed  of  two 
cinquefoils  and  three  fleurs-de-lis.  The  shield  is  surmounted  by  an  esquire's 
helmet  and  mantling,  and  has  for  the  crest  the  figure  of  a  man  couped  at  the 
breast  and  vested,  but  the  head-covering  is  more  like  a  mitre  than  a  regal 
Crown.  The  legend  is  "They  Ryght  defend."  [The  illustration  .shows  the 
arms  and  crest  as  they  appear  upon  the  seal,  and  in  the  form  they  are  used.] 

SPAIN,  Kingdom  of  Quarterly  :  i  and  4  gules,  a  castle  or  (Castile) ;  2  and  3  argent, 
a  lion  rampant  gules  (sometimes  represented  purpure),  crowned  or  (Leon)  ent^ 
en  point  argent,  a  pomegranate  gules,  seeded  and  slipped  proper  (Grenada). 
Supporters — (Which  are  very  seldom  used)  Two  lions  or,  holding  banners  of  the 
arms. 

Whilst  the  foregoing  arms  may  be  properly  described  as  the  arms  of  the 
Kingdom  of  Spain  they  are  usually  surmounted  by  an  escutcheon  of  the  arms 
of  France  azure,  three  fleurs-de-lis  or. 

Almost  as  often  they  appear,  with  the  inescutcheon  of  France  thereupon, 
themselves  as  an  inescutcheon  upon  a  larger  escutcheon  of  three  rows  of 
quarterings  as  follows  (upper  row) : — 

1.  Or,  four  pallets  gules  (Arragon). 

2.  Per  saltire,  the  chief  and  base  paly  or  and  gules,  the  flanks  argent, 
charged  with  an  eagle  displayed  sable  (Sicily). 

3.  Gules,  a  fesse  argent  (Austria). 

4.  Azure,  seme-de-lis  or,  a  bordure  compony  argent  and  gules  (Burgundy, 
modern). 

5.  (Second  row)  On  dexter  side  of  inescutcheon,  or,  six  fleurs-de  lis  azure, 
three,  two,  and  one  azure  (Parma). 

6.  On  sinister  side  of  inescutcheon,  or,  five  balls  gules,  in  chief  another  of 
a  larger  size  azure,  thereon  three  fleur-de-lis  or  (Tuscany). 

7.  (Third  row)  Bendy  or  and  azure,  a  bordure  gules  (Burgundy,  ancient). 

8.  Or,  a  lion  rampant  sable  (Flanders). 

9.  Argent,  an  eagle  displayed  gules. 

10.  Sable,  a  lion  rampant  or  (Brabant). 

It  is  almost  universal  for  the  escutcheon  of  the  royal  arms  of  Spain  to  be 
drawn  as  an  oval  cartouche. 

742 


SOUTHWOLD 


SOUTHWELL,  SEE  OF 


U  D  I-  I  C  J 


SPAIN 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

SPANISH  MERCHANTS,  Company  of.  Azure  in  base  a  sea,  with  a  dolphin's 
head  appearing  in  the  water  all  proper,  on  the  sea  a  ship  of  three  masts,  in  full 
sail,  all  or,  the  sail  and  rigging  argent,  on  each  a  cross  gules,  in  the  dexter 
chief  point  the  sun  in  splendour,  in  the  sinister  chief  point  an  estoile  of  the 
third  ;  on  a  chief  of  the  fourth,  a  cross  of  the  fifth,  charged  with  the  lion  of 
England.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  two  arms  embowed  issuing  out  ol 
clouds  all  proper,  holding  in  the  hands  a  globe  or.  Supporters — Two  seahorses 
argent,  finned  or. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

SPAR.     Or,  a  lion  rampant  gules. 

[This   coat  is  borne  for   Spar  by  the  Earls  of  Caithness,  and  some  other 
members  of  the  Sinclair  family.] 

SPECTACLE-MAKERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of,  London.  (Incorporated 
i6th  INlay  1629.)  Has  no  arms.  Uses  indifferently  two  spurious  coats  {a)  azure, 
three  pairs  of  spectacles,  or  {b)  azure,  a  pair  of  compasses  e-xpanded  chevron- 
wise  between  two  pairs  of  spectacles  in  chief  and  a  terrestrial  globe  on  a  stand 
in  base,  all  argent.  Crest — Two  arms  counter-embowed,  vested  (?  azure)  semee 
of  mullets  argent,  cuffed  argent,  holding  in  the  hands  proper  a  serpent  biting 
its  tail  in  a  circle,  and  within  the  same  the  sun  in  his  splendour.  Motto — "  A 
blessing  to  the  aged." 

[Both  of  these  devices  are  equally  without  authority.] 

SPURRIERS.     Refer  to  Blacksmiths  and  Spurriers. 

STAFFORDSHIRE  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  County  Council  have 
adopted  for  the  seal  and  stationery  the  arms  "  Or,  a  chevron  gules,"  which  are 
those  of  the  old  family  of  Stafford,  now  represented  by  the  Right  Hon. 
Baron  Stafford,  who  quarters  the  said  arms.  His  Grace  the  Duke  of  Sutherland, 
who  is  Marquess  of  the  County  of  Stafford — the  title  being  used  by  his  eldest 
son — is  not  connected  with  the  Stafford  family.  The  County  Council  surround 
the  arms  with  a  continuous  succession  of  Stafford  knots  "a  la  Cordeliere," 
adorned  with  four  medallions,  having  allusion  to  the  industries  of  the  County, 
and  bearing:  (i)  A  garb,  I  imagine,  for  Agriculture;  (2)  A  jug,  presumbly 
for  the  Pottery  trade  ;  (3)  The  astronomical  sign  of  Mars,  which  is  always 
understood  to  represent  the  Iron  industry;  and  (4)  A  black  lozenge,  which 
I  can  only  suggest  may  have  some  allusion  to  a  lump  of  coal.  Burke  in  his 
"General  Armory"  plants  inter  alia  on  the  long-suffering  town  of  Stafford 
a  coat  which  he  blazons  "the  base  vert,  a  castle  triple-towered  ppr.  between 
four  lions  passant  guardant  or,  in  base  a  lion  of  the  last."  This  is  the  coat 
which,  on  the  "  twopenny  coloured  "  sheet  of  county  arms  frequently  alluded 
to,  appears  in  all  its  gorgeous  colouring.  Berry  takes  "  from  an  entry  in  the 
Office  of  Arms  in  1778  "  the  real  coat  of  the  town  of  Staftbrd,  and  gives  that : 
but  the  County  of  Staffordshire  is  usually  represented  by  the  badge  of  the 
Stafford  knot,  as  witness  its  appropriation  by  the  North  Staffordshire  Railway. 

744 


SPECTACLE-MAKERS,  COMPANY  OF 


THE   BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

STAFFORD  (Staffordshire).  Gules,  a  quadrangular  castle  in  perspective,  the 
four  towers  domed  argent,  and  each  surmounted  by  a  pennon  or,  between, 
in  chief,  two  Stafford  knots,  and  in  base  a  hon  passant  guardant  of  the  last. 

Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms. 

Burke  quotes  two  coats  as  follows  : — "  Stafford,  Town  of  (Co.  Stafford). — 
Or,  on  a  chief  gu.  a  serpent  nowed  of  the  first.  Another  Coat — The  base  vert, 
a  castle  triple-towered  ppr.  betw.  four  lions  pass,  guard  or,  in  base  a  lion  of  the 
last."  Though  one  cannot  help  fancying  a  "serpent  nowed"  is  much  like 
a  "  Stafford  Knot."  Berry  contents  himself  with  the  latter.  Perhaps,  owing 
to  the  fact  that  so  many  versions  are  quoted,  the  Town-Clerk's  stationery  has 
no  arms  upon  it,  simply  exhibiting  a  copy  of  the  seal.  The  legend  is  "Sigillum 
communitatis  villje  Staffordiae,"  and  represents  in  base  water,  and  therein 
a  fish  naiant.  Upon  the  water  is  a  castle  triple-towered,  between  four  lions 
passant  guardant,  and  on  either  side  a  (fleur-de-lis?)  in  fesse. 

STAFFORD'S  INN  (Office  of  the  King's  Remembrancer  of  the  Exchequer). 

Or,  a  chevron  gules,  a  bordure  gobony  argent  and  azure,  a  canton  ermine. 
[Of  no  authority.] 

STALYBRIDGE  (Cheshire).  Argent,  a  chevron  engrailed  gules,  between  two 
crosses  pointed  voided  in  chief  sable,  and  a  mullet  in  base  also  sable,  and 
pierced  of  the  field,  with  two  flanches  azure,  each  charged  with  a  cinquefoil 
of  the  field.  Crest — A  garb  or,  in  front  thereof  a  wolf  statant  argent.  Motto — 
"  Absque  labore  nihil." 

Granted  by  Sir  Charles  George  Young,  Knt.,  Garter  Principal  King  of 
Arms  ;  L.  Pulman,  Esq.,  Clarenceux  King  of  Arms ;  Robert  Laurie,  Esq.,  Norroy 
King  of  Arms,  iSth  June  1857. 

STAMFORD  (Lincolnshire).  Party  per  pale,  the  dexter  side  gules,  three  lions 
passant  guardant  in  pale  or  and  the  sinister  cliequy  or  and  azure. 

[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

Upon  the  seal  and  upon  the  Corporation  notepaper  two  "somethings" 
appear  in  the  position  usually  appropriated  in  an  achievement  to  supporters  ; 
but  they  be  neither  "fish,  flesh,  fowl,  nor  good  red  herring,"  nor  could  they 
answer  to  any  known  form  of  an  "  heraldic  beast." 

STAPLE  INN.     Vert,  a  woolpack  argent,  corded  of  the  last. 
[Of  no  authorit)'.] 


m 


STAPLE  MERCHANTS  OF  LONDON.  (Incorporated  by  Edward  III., 
whose  reign  they  held  their  staple  for  Wool  at  Calais,  from  whence  it  was 
removed  to  England  in  the  year  13S9.)  Barr}'  nebuly  of  si.x  argent  and  azure, 
on  a  chief  gules,  a  lion  passant  guardant  or.  Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours, 
a  ram  argent,  armed  and  unguled  or.  Supporters — Two  rams  argent,  armed  and 
unguled  or.  Motto — "  God  be  our  friend." 
[Recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms.] 

746 


STAFFORD 


STALYBRIDGE 


STAMFORD 


STAPLE  INN 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

STARCH  MAKERS'  COMPANY  (London).  (Incorporated  13th  May  1622.) 
Azure,  two  garbs  in  saltire  vert,  on  a  cliief  or,  a  lion  passant  guardant  gules. 
Crest — On  a  wreath  of  the  colours,  a  woman's  head  and  breast  proper,  vested 
gules,  her  hair  or,  all  within  a  chaplet  of  ears  of  wheat  proper.  Supporters — 
(Dexter)  a  figure  representing  Vulcan,  on  his  head  a  cap  gules,  habited  in  a 
short  jacket  proper,  sleeves  gules,  and  breeches,  stockings  azure,  shoes  sable, 
in  his  dexter  hand  a  hammer  erect  azure  ;  (sinister)  a  female  figure  representing 
Plenty,  cloaked  azure,  vested  carnation,  in  her  sinister  hand  a  cornucopia,  out 
of  which  and  round  her  temples  ears  of  wheat  all  or. 
[Granted  by  Borough,  Garter,  1639.] 

STATIONERS,  The  Worshipful  Company  of  (London).  (Incorporated  1556.) 
Azure,  on  a  chevron  or,  between  three  books  lying  fesseways  garnished,  leaved 
and  clasped  of  the  second  (clasps  downwards),  an  eagle  rising  gules,  crowned 
with  a  diadem  or  between  two  roses  of  the  last,  seeded  or,  barbed  vert,  in  chief, 
issuant  out  of  a  cloud  of  sunbeams  gold,  a  Holy  Spirit,  the  wings  displayed 
silver  with  a  diadem  gold.     Motto — "  Verbum  Domini  manet  in  aeternum." 

[Granted  by  Dethick,  Garter  King  of  Arms,  1557.] 

[The  eagle  in  the  arms  is  sometimes  represented  as  a  dove.  Two  crests 
and  supporters,  which  are  not  recorded  in  the  College  of  Arms,  are  attributed  to 
the  Company,  viz. :  i.  An  eagle  proper  rising  within  a  nimbus  or,  holding  a 
penner  and  inkhorn  sable.  2.  A  Bible  open  proper,  clasped  and  garnished  or. 
Supporters — Two  angels  proper,  vested  argent,  each  blowing  a  trumpet  or.] 

STATIONERS  (Dublin).  Refer  to  Cutlers,  Paynter-stayners  and  Stationers, 
Guild  of 

STEPNEY,  Borough  of  (London).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  seal  is  not 
heraldic. 

STEPNEY,  Bishop  of     As  a  Suffragan  he  has  no  official  arms. 

STETTIN  (Prussia).     Azure,  a  griffin's  head  erased  gules,  armed  and  beaked  or. 

STEWARTON  (Ayrshire).  Has  no  arms.  The  seal  has  a  representation  of  a 
Scottish  bonnet  charged  with  an  escutcheon  argent,  charged  with  an  shakefork 
sable.     Below  is  the  Motto — "  Over  fork  over." 

STEWART'S  COLLEGE  (Edinburgh).  Has  no  armorial  bearings.  The  school 
is  administered  by  the  Company  of  Merchants  of  Edinburgh  and  some  use  is 
made  of  the  arms  of  the  Company.  But  ordinarily  the  arms  in  use  are 
supposed  to  be  those  of  the  founder,  Daniel  Stewart  of  the  Exchequer,  a  citizen 
of  Edinburgh  who  died  in  1814.  These  are  :  Quarterly  i  and4,  or,  a  lion  rampant 
within  a  double  tressure  gules ;  2  and  3  .  .  .  three  garbs.  .  .  .  Motto — "  Never 
unprepared."  There  appears  to  be  some  doubt  about  the  colours,  but  the 
second  and  third  quarters  are  probably  intended  for  azure,  three  garbs  or.  On 
the  school  caps,  which  are  black,  both  garbs  and  lion  are  embroidered  in  red  on 
black,  which  is  probably  only  a  representation  in  red  outline. 

748 


STATIONERS,  COMPANY  OF 


STEWART'S  COLLEGE 


THE  BOOK  OF  PUBLIC  ARMS 

STIRLING,  Council  of  the  County  of.  Azure,  on  a  saltire  between  two  caltraps 
in  chief  and  base,  and  as  many  spur-rowels  in  the  flanks  argent,  a  lion  rampant 
gules  armed  and  langued  of  the  first. 

[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register,  the  29th  day  of  September  1890.] 

STIRLING  (Stirlingshire).  The  entry  in  Lyon  Register  is  as  follow  : — "  The 
Royall  Burgh  of  Striveling  bears.  Azure,  on  a  mound,  or  basement,  a  castle 
triple-towered  without  windows  argent,  masoned  sable,  the  gate  closed  gules, 
surrounded  with  four  oak-trees  disposed  in  orle  of  the  second,  the  interestices 
of  the  field  being  sem^e  of  stars  of  six  rays  of  the  last.  All  surrounded  with 
this  Inscription,  Continet  hoc  in  se  Nemus  et  Castrum  Strivelinse.  (Signed) 
James  Lorimer,  Interim  Lyon  Clerk. 

"  Lyon  Office,  Edinburgh,  25th  April  1849 — There  was  presented,  of  this 
date,  a  distinct  Impression  of  the  Common  Seal  of  the  Royal  Burgh  of  Stirling, 
from  which  the  above  Arms  have  now  been  herein  recorded." 

STIRLING,  HIGH  SCHOOL  OF.  Argent,  on  a  mount  in  base  the  figure  of 
Queen  Margaret,  richly  habited  and  crowned,  bearing  in  her  right  hand  a  sceptre 
and  in  her  left  a  book,  all  proper,  between  two  trees  of  knowledge  vert,  fructed 
or,  and  at  her  feet  a  wolf  couchant  guardant  also  proper,  and  in  an  escrol  over 
the  shield  this  A/otto— "  Tempori  parendum." 
[Matriculated  in  Lyon  Register.] 

STOCKBRIDGE  (Hampshire).  Has  no  armorial  bearings,  but  the  following  are 
quoted  in  Burke's  "  General  Armory  " : — "  Gu.,  three  lions  pass,  in  pale  per 
pale  or  and  an,"  whilst  Berry  gives,  "  Gu.  three  lions  pass,  guardant  in 
pal